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milkmania
08-27-2005, 09:58 PM
Stacey David had a show on today.... Either Trucks! or PowerStroke TV where he showed how to make BioDiesel.

I know we have another thread that that covered the topic, but this thread IS the topic.

Vegetable Oil, Methanol, and Lye, and he claimed he had about 70 a gallon invested in it.

He showed how to check the titration, and made 20 gallons.
Emptied his Dodge diesel's fuel tank from diesel, and used straight cooking oil,
And FREAKIN' ROASTED the tires!!!:headbang:

At one point, he claimed the original diesel engines were built to run on peanut oil... don't know if that's a valid claim, but I was impressed with the simplicity of converting oil to fuel.
here's the link for the show....looks like another airing on the 28th.
Episode #: 2005-13R
Air Dates: Saturday @ 1:30pm EST/PST,Sunday @ 1:30pm EST/PST
http://www.truckstv.com/show_details.aspx?iid=4996&tid=2

He used a system from Freedom something or other.... I'll have to google it to be sure.

milkmania
08-27-2005, 10:04 PM
Freedom Fuel America
http://www.freedomfuelamerica.com/index.asp

6ballsisall
08-27-2005, 10:35 PM
Pretty cool Milk! I've made some of this stuff but we didn't have any of the cool kits like this. Did they say what one of those kits cost?

milkmania
08-27-2005, 11:09 PM
Pretty cool Milk! I've made some of this stuff but we didn't have any of the cool kits like this. Did they say what one of those kits cost?

looks like the FuelMeister that they used on the show runs $2995.00
http://www.biodieselsolutions.com/home/home.asp

check out the faq's at Freedom Fuel
http://www.freedomfuelamerica.com/products/faq.asp

it appears it's a 1:1 ratio, and it takes 8 gallons of Methanol to make 40 gallons of biodiesel.


*edit
oops, they used the FuelMeister Plus on the show.....two tanks to help speed up the process............$3995.00

6ballsisall
08-27-2005, 11:32 PM
I was trying to find some prices on Methanol in bulk. I am curious as to how they figured 70 cents per gallon. They must have ammoratized the cost of the machine into the price of making the diesel, the question is how many gallons a year did they figure it would take to get the price down to 70 cents per gallon

erkoehler
08-28-2005, 12:42 AM
Is it really going to be worth it? Don't you think it would have become more popular at a greater rate if it truly was feasible/profitable?

6ballsisall
08-28-2005, 08:48 AM
Is it really going to be worth it? Don't you think it would have become more popular at a greater rate if it truly was feasible/profitable?


If you hang is diesel world it is getting very popular, almost as popular as all the mods they make for these engines now days. I really question the 70 cents per gallon claim and would like to see how the derived that math. Besides making diesel for cheap, it's nice to know you are helping the environment by decreasing the need for fuel extraction. Farmers like it because now they can grow the bean used to make this oil and they have a good profitable crop. This stuff is getting very popular and you can buy B20 and other blends in quite a few locations now. The problem is these stations haven't been able to make it cost effective and it costs more than regular diesel right now.

bigmac
08-28-2005, 09:05 AM
Stacey David had a show on today.... Either Trucks! or PowerStroke TV where he showed how to make BioDiesel.

Vegetable Oil, Methanol, and Lye, and he claimed he had about 70 a gallon invested in it.

He showed how to check the titration, and made 20 gallons.
Emptied his Dodge diesel's fuel tank from diesel, and used straight cooking oil,
And FREAKIN' ROASTED the tires!!!:headbang:




Biodiesel is interesting stuff. I have a buddy that is a biodiesel fanatic and has been making the stuff for a couple of years. His truck smells like McDonalds. His previous vehicle (for experimenting as he was getting started) was an old Volkswagon Golf. After first few tanks, it scrubbed his fuel system so efficiently that he must have replaced fuel filters about 10 times. After a while, it broke down many of the rubber seals and gaskets in the fuel system. Hasn't been a problem with newer vehicles.

Biodiesel doesn't produce excess CO2 (greenhouse), has no sulfur (acid rain), is water soluble (harmless to aquatic life) and biodegradeable in water. It's safer than petroleum diesel (much higher flash point), and it can be mixed with petroleum diesel, so you don't need to worry about filling at the pump if you run out of biodiesel.

OTOH, not all US diesel engines are warrantied for use with biodiesel, and most warranties state that engine damage from a non-approved fuel isn't covered. In Europe, however, virtually all consumer diesel engines are warrantied for use with biodiesel. I wonder if it matters if it's home-made biodiesel. Also, storage of biodiesel can be a problem - it will grow mold if it sits too long in a tank, and it's more prone to gelling in cold temps. Biggest concern is that is would be a major contributer to smog (nitrogen oxide -> ozone), so it's a problem in LA or Denver.

Cool stuff, though. It's just another reason for me to consider a diesel for my next truck. Unlike ethanol/gasoline blends (which are a hoax promulgated by farmers and politicians), biodiesel has some really significant potential value.


.

milkmania
08-28-2005, 10:35 AM
Biodiesel is interesting stuff. I have a buddy that is a biodiesel fanatic and has been making the stuff for a couple of years. His truck smells like McDonalds.
I want my truck to smell like Krispy Kremes:steering:


Cool stuff, though. It's just another reason for me to consider a diesel for my next truck.

same here:headbang:

Workin' 4 Toys
08-28-2005, 08:21 PM
Which diesels work the best with vegetable oil?
Direct injection, Indirect injection, Common rail, VE, Rotary inline, unit injectors, Computer controlled, We have tried and tested them all. With only a few exceptions, we have found through extensive field tests, that most any diesel will burn vegetable oil as long as it has been converted properly. Currently, the only vehicle we recommend against is the 1998.5 thru 2002 Dodge Cummins pickups that have a VP44 injection pump. The GM 5.7 and the Volvo diesel are 2, that while there are no problems with the convertibility of them, have a less than perfect track record as far as overall reliability. Other than the afore mentioned vehicles, we can convert your diesel.

Workin' 4 Toys
08-28-2005, 08:22 PM
Can I fill up my Greasel tank with diesel fuel?
Yes. Diesel and vegetable oil mix just fine, so if you find your self in a situation where you need to, go for it.

Workin' 4 Toys
08-28-2005, 08:26 PM
Although a great idea here:
www.greasel.com (http://www.greasel.com)
www.greasecar.com (http://www.greasecar.com)

My next bunch of money may go towards one of these badboys:
http://www.quigley4x4.com/
Room for everything!!! Then grease it!!