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Playing hookie Prostar 190
07-19-2012, 12:43 PM
Hello, Hey I was wondering what type of proppellers others are using for pulling barefooters on the older master craft 1989 prostar 190. ford 351W with a 1:1 trans. standard rotation engine ( LH prop)
With the low water levels like on most lakes here in northern IL, I dammaged my current prop and before I buy another I thought I would ask to see the pros/ cons of what others are using and why.

current prop (before the dings) oj Legand 4 blade brass 13 x 13 LH good pull out of the hole limited top end 41mph. with the way the boat is loaded.
I would do again but I want to know more about the acme models .
I was told on the phone that the acme 541 3 blade is suppose to be a better prop than the legand 4 blade. does any one else agree with this? Another rec a 5 blade model by another mfg.
I like to try and keep or add a mph or two to the boat. It is loaded pretty heavy with gear and ect. (boat stock is like 2200 lbs, mine is like 3000 with everything in it) Its no rocket ship but Its what I have to work with and with new tech Id like to keep it at the top if its game. any info would be helpful thanks.

Jerseydave
07-19-2012, 05:56 PM
Ask Eric @ OJ props about prop selection.

Why do you have 800 extra lbs on your boat?

kyfooter
07-20-2012, 12:07 PM
Stick with the original size prop and ensure that your RPMs are in the suggested operating window at WOT (likely 4,400 - 4,800 RPM). I had an '86 and there is just not much you're going to do to change the top end speed by more than 1 or 2 mph at best on that hull. Theory is a higher pitched prop will get you more top speed, but it also creates slightly more load on the engine/transmission, and your RPMs will decrease slightly. So say you're running 41 at 4,600 RPMs with a 13 x 13, you might switch to a 13 x 15, max out at 4,400-4,500 RPM and get to 42 MPH or so. Lower pitch, better hole shot.

Keeping the size as close to OEM is my recommendation. As for actual brand, I have OJ props on mine.

snobinge
07-23-2012, 05:37 PM
I run the ACME 541 on my 98 PS 205. Stock was the 13X13 Legend 4 blade. I did not notice any loss on the bottom and have gained 2mph on top. Seems to be more efficient as well as in my application I run lower RPM with the ACME. I would highly recommend the ACME if you need to buy a new prop. Check out Nettle props...good pricing and great customer service.

TRBenj
07-24-2012, 03:27 PM
Stick with the original size prop and ensure that your RPMs are in the suggested operating window at WOT (likely 4,400 - 4,800 RPM). I had an '86 and there is just not much you're going to do to change the top end speed by more than 1 or 2 mph at best on that hull. Theory is a higher pitched prop will get you more top speed, but it also creates slightly more load on the engine/transmission, and your RPMs will decrease slightly. So say you're running 41 at 4,600 RPMs with a 13 x 13, you might switch to a 13 x 15, max out at 4,400-4,500 RPM and get to 42 MPH or so.
Your theory is incorrect (for a direct drive inboard) and so is your math. Every inch of pitch will equate to ~200rpm. I do agree that sticking with a stock-ish sized prop (that keeps your WOT revs close to the recommended range) will yield the best performance. Many times, going to a steeper prop (more pitch) will slow the boat down- both out of the hole AND up top. Its about matching RPM's to the engine's powerband, not a "more is always better" type of thing.

My experience with 1:1 boats is on the RH side of things, but those recommending the 541 are right on. (Mine has been the same with the 540, the RH version of that prop.) You'll pick up a bit of holeshot and a few mph up top, as compared to that 13x13 4-blade. RPM's will be very similar across the band. A great all around prop, no doubt.

If you run a lot of weight most of the time, you may want to consider a prop with less pitch (like the 543). It will run a few more rpm's across the band and be a tick slower than the 541 at WOT, but it will have an even better holeshot, and still be faster than that 13x13 4-blade.

BrianM
07-24-2012, 03:35 PM
I ran an Acme 541 on my '88 and it was great. Nice hole shot and good top end. that Legend 4 blade isn't the best prop on that boat.

kyfooter
07-24-2012, 10:17 PM
Your theory is incorrect (for a direct drive inboard) and so is your math. Every inch of pitch will equate to ~200rpm. I do agree that sticking with a stock-ish sized prop (that keeps your WOT revs close to the recommended range) will yield the best performance. Many times, going to a steeper prop (more pitch) will slow the boat down- both out of the hole AND up top. Its about matching RPM's to the engine's powerband, not a "more is always better" type of thing.

My experience with 1:1 boats is on the RH side of things, but those recommending the 541 are right on. (Mine has been the same with the 540, the RH version of that prop.) You'll pick up a bit of holeshot and a few mph up top, as compared to that 13x13 4-blade. RPM's will be very similar across the band. A great all around prop, no doubt.

If you run a lot of weight most of the time, you may want to consider a prop with less pitch (like the 543). It will run a few more rpm's across the band and be a tick slower than the 541 at WOT, but it will have an even better holeshot, and still be faster than that 13x13 4-blade.


We'll have to agree to disagree. The "math" was for example only, not a scientific calculation. The RPM change for a pitch change of 2 is anywhere from 200 to 500 RPM. That being said, I don't understand your suggestion that a higher pitched prop takes speed off the top end, and hole shot. That goes against everything I've ever experienced, including my time working for a propeller dealer and custom trailer mfg. I have had nothing but direct drive boats, and I've switched props in an attempt for more speed and more hole shot...one of my boats was almost identical to the 89 Prostar (mine was an 86). A higher pitched prop on that boat will without a doubt drop the RPMs, and a lower pitched prop will unquestionably increase the RPMs. At the same RPMs, a higher pitched prop will give you more speed than a lower pitched prop at the same RPMs. The key is ensuring you are operating in the suggested WOT RPMs. It's the same concept as rear-end gear ratios on vehicles.

Again...maybe we just agree to disagree. Good luck with the prop. Bottom line, I barefoot a lot. Rarely do you need to hammer the throttle to pull anyone out on a deep water start. That is a common misperception. Pick your prop based on how you will use the boat the majority of the time. You can also experiment with different brands, cups, etc.

atlfootr
07-29-2012, 10:10 PM
I'll check my numbers ...

barefoot
07-29-2012, 10:43 PM
I run the ACME 541 on my 98 PS 205. Stock was the 13X13 Legend 4 blade. I did not notice any loss on the bottom and have gained 2mph on top. Seems to be more efficient as well as in my application I run lower RPM with the ACME. I would highly recommend the ACME if you need to buy a new prop. Check out Nettle props...good pricing and great customer service.



I think my father-in-law is running the same prop on his '87 PS. When we switched, we gave the boat a tune-up and the difference was awesome. We gained hole shot and top end. I'm sure the prop didn't do all that. My theory was that nothing had been done to the boat tune-up wise in several years. The combination made the difference. Now it's a very enjoyable boat to foot behind.

barefoot
07-29-2012, 10:44 PM
5 Blade. I'll check my numbers ...


Alt, I don't think that's even an option...

atlfootr
07-29-2012, 11:15 PM
You maybe right, I'm currently runn'n a SS 4 blade on mine.

barefoot
07-29-2012, 11:58 PM
He's got a 190...that's the only reason I say it. Do they make a 5 blade for the ProV?

atlfootr
07-30-2012, 01:04 AM
That's what I was referring to, that I might know of a guy that runs a 5 blade on his ProV200.
So here's what I found, some may already know this -- it's for those who don't.
I pulled the resources from my Yamaha manual ....

How do I find my propeller’s pitch and diameter?

Numbers are stamped into each propeller’s inner hub that identify the diameter and pitch size.

The first number is the diameter, which may include a fraction.
The second number with a propeller series letter identifier beside it will represent the pitch.
For example, you may see 15 1/8 X 25T or 13 3/4 X 17M.
Some propellers show this information in multiple locations. In the below diagram examples 1, 3 and 5 show you where you may find this on the propeller.

http://www.yamahaoutboards.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/faq_props2.jpg


When looking at my propeller, I noticed two numbers and a letter stamped into the side.
What do they mean?

The numbers represent the pitch size. The letter is a code that represents the propeller series. The letter code identifies to your dealer what range of outboard motors the propeller is designed to fit. For example- a 17M is a 17" pitch M series designed for outboard motors from 150~300 HP. Below is a diagram showing where you may find this information; locations can differ from prop to prop.
http://www.yamahaoutboards.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/faq_props.jpg

Should I use a three blade or four blade propeller?

Three bladed propellers are the most widely used, as they provide a good balance of performance characteristics and cost.
They are available in a wide variety of styles that make them suitable for most boating applications.
From their balanced performance characteristics to their stability and overall efficiency, this style of propeller is the norm.
Four bladed propellers offer some specific advantages over their three bladed counterparts, but are not correct for every application.

Four bladed props are used where one or more of these advantages are desired to achieve a particular performance goal in a particular boating application.

Advantages typically include faster hole shot and acceleration, improved bow lift and the ability to maintain plane at lower slower engine speeds. Improved grip typically allows higher engine mounting heights and trim angles, improved anti-ventilation characteristics in heavy seas, and can also enhance transom lift for heavy transom boats.

Four bladed props usually result in lower top speeds; their use can create different boat handling characteristics.
They generally need one pitch lower than the proper three blade to maintain the recommended wide open throttle (WOT) engine RPM.

TRBenj
07-30-2012, 01:32 PM
That being said, I don't understand your suggestion that a higher pitched prop takes speed off the top end, and hole shot. That goes against everything I've ever experienced, including my time working for a propeller dealer and custom trailer mfg. I have had nothing but direct drive boats, and I've switched props in an attempt for more speed and more hole shot...one of my boats was almost identical to the 89 Prostar (mine was an 86). A higher pitched prop on that boat will without a doubt drop the RPMs, and a lower pitched prop will unquestionably increase the RPMs. At the same RPMs, a higher pitched prop will give you more speed than a lower pitched prop at the same RPMs. The key is ensuring you are operating in the suggested WOT RPMs. It's the same concept as rear-end gear ratios on vehicles.
Well, yeah, a prop with more pitch is going to move the boat faster if youre keeping the RPM's constant. Thats a given. The question is whether or not going to a prop with more pitch is going to make the boat faster, period (at WOT). The answer is, and always is, "it depends".

More pitch will not always make a boat faster- many times it can slow it down. If you choose a prop that limits your WOT RPM's to the point where the engine never gets to where it makes peak hp, then the boat wont run as fast. Same thing goes for a shorter prop- if you let the engine spin up well beyond the hp peak, the boat will not be as fast. When propped to turn very close to your hp peak at WOT, you will maximize top speed.