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JohnnyB
07-04-2012, 08:16 AM
I am excited as my 12 yr old announced last night she wants to finish learning her deep water slalom start.

Was getting it on the boom w pigtail last fall....now going to long line.

I self taught myself to slalom deep up 30+ yrs ago......any new school pointers?

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

mikeg205
07-04-2012, 05:03 PM
cheater rope.... http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/details.cgi?pdesc=Gladiator-Slalom-Trainer-Ski-Rope&i=44426&str=ski+rope&merchID=4005

takes a lot of the frustration out of it.

Calincanada
07-04-2012, 06:34 PM
As a 12 yr old may be tough as she wont be strong enough to hang on. Maybe she is, i dont know.
I was taught to put the ski up, bend knees to chest, stay leaned or weighted back. Arms extended, if you ride left foot forward put the rope on the left side of the ski. Let the boat pull you, once ski is moving forward stay leaned back until ski stops darting, extend legs out as boat pulls forward.
I never learned to drop a ski, only deep water. Works great, but i dont know if i culd have done it at 12, need to hold tough for 2 seconds than stand .

Good luck.

madcityskier
07-04-2012, 06:59 PM
A short rope on an extended pylon helps with pulling them up. I've had great luck being in the water with them. You can hold the tail of the ski with two fingers for a tiny bit of added stability and the same on the back of their vest to help keep them from going out the front if they're looking down. Also gives a calming influence. Did this for my daughter on her first two deep water starts. By the third I was just near her in the water. She is twelve as well.

03geetee
07-04-2012, 09:21 PM
Good driving helps, put that confidence in them that you are going to get them up even though they are doing most of the work.

I remember my first time, oh wait skiing thats right.....

LOL

JTR

D3skier
07-04-2012, 10:16 PM
cheater rope.... http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/details.cgi?pdesc=Gladiator-Slalom-Trainer-Ski-Rope&i=44426&str=ski+rope&merchID=4005

takes a lot of the frustration out of it.

I second the trainer handle... my old ski buddy learned this way at Cobble ski school. It's been so long for me I don't remember how/when I learned

nkorep2
07-04-2012, 11:29 PM
If left foot forward, put rope on the left side. This helps alot. Get her to suck in her stomach to tighten the core. Then Id say assuming she is strong enough, she shouldnt have too much issue. To much throttle often will cause the skier to go over the front foot. A gradual throttle is what Ive had most success with in teaching kids. And yes, extended pylon or tower and shorter rope helps a lot.

It like standing up out of a lazy boy!

ricford
07-05-2012, 12:16 AM
If left foot forward, put rope on the left side. This helps alot. Get her to suck in her stomach to tighten the core. Then Id say assuming she is strong enough, she shouldnt have too much issue. To much throttle often will cause the skier to go over the front foot. A gradual throttle is what Ive had most success with in teaching kids. And yes, extended pylon or tower and shorter rope helps a lot.

It like standing up out of a lazy boy!

Wow, I've been doing wrong for 35 years now. I'm left forward and always put the rope on the right side of the ski. It's as if I was getting up on two (rope in the middle) then move my right foot to the back, that puts the rope on the right side of the ski.

DJ 50
07-05-2012, 02:03 AM
Wow, I've been doing wrong for 35 years now. I'm left forward and always put the rope on the right side of the ski. It's as if I was getting up on two (rope in the middle) then move my right foot to the back, that puts the rope on the right side of the ski.

Ya I'm with you. I also am left foot forward and put the rope on the right side. I'm mean I guess whatever works for you but who is right here?

madcityskier
07-05-2012, 06:14 AM
X3 on left foot/right rope right foot/left rope.

jafo9
07-05-2012, 08:55 AM
same here. rope goes on the opposite side of the forward foot. one of my daughters is 10. she started with one ski last year with the trainer rope. now she deep water starts on one ski with no problem with a regular rope.

tideengineer
07-05-2012, 09:21 AM
I deep water started at about 10...used a cheater rope the first few times, then went skiing with family friends that didn't have a cheater rope so I put the rope on side of the ski and did it. My 15 year old son learned a few years ago with just regular rope...we gentle pull out of the water and use "patience" instead of too much power.

nkorep2
07-05-2012, 11:28 AM
Wow, I've been doing wrong for 35 years now. I'm left forward and always put the rope on the right side of the ski. It's as if I was getting up on two (rope in the middle) then move my right foot to the back, that puts the rope on the right side of the ski.

Ya I'm with you. I also am left foot forward and put the rope on the right side. I'm mean I guess whatever works for you but who is right here?

X3 on left foot/right rope right foot/left rope.

Its true, once you learn it doesnt matter which side its on really. I just noticed when I learned, and when Ive taught others, that if they have the rope this way and arent ready, they tend to get turned once the boat pulls. I think having the left foot, left side rope orientation helps keep the pull of the boat centered thru your center of mass, and keeps you from getting turned. But like I said, once you learn, it probably doesnt matter very much.

tideengineer
07-05-2012, 11:33 AM
...having a military dad screaming at you can either help or hurt also...

east tx skier
07-05-2012, 12:12 PM
Deep V handle is a must.

1. Arms Straight
2. Knees Bent
3. Ski tip out of the water.
4. Let the boat pull you up, i.e., don't try to stand up too fast.

Apart from that, if you have an old flat bottom wooden ski with a big metal fin, it helps. The wide skis aren't bad for getting up, but are miserable to ride.

Plenty will tell you that booms and extended pylons are great teaching tools. To each their own. I have never bothered with them. We have had plenty of success with the four simple instructions and trainer handles and have never bothered with anything else.

I transitioned my six year old from a rope attached to the trainer skis to an ordinary handle yesterday. Four simple instructions. He fell the first time and got up on the second try. He fell in the turn-around at the end of the lake and got up again with no trouble.

JohnnyB
07-06-2012, 12:28 PM
Got out on the water with my wife and daughters about 9am this am. My daughter was anxious to get to the boat but once we got launched, she said "Dad, can you go first....."

I think apprehension set in a little bit. I did a couple of free skiing slalom runs on the glass.

After that she took her turn....

She took a run on the Jr. Combos and then decided to work on slalom. We went with 28 off from the tower and after about a 1/2 dozen tries, she came out of the water and rode about 50feet. She took a break and I did another slalom run. Then she wanted to go again....got up right away and rode about a 1/2 mile crossing the wakes gradually the whole way. We then talked a bit about posture and hand position on the handle and took the rope out to 15 off on the tower. From that run we progressed to 15 off on the pylon. Then I suggested she graduated to my wife's old Connelly Stinger and rode that 1st try for about a 1/2 mile before she was tired.

Unfortunately, I had to call into a meeting at that point, so we had to pack it up.

She's already bugging me about going tonight and tomorrow morning :D

JohnnyB
07-06-2012, 12:30 PM
She also wants to graduate to my wifes Obrien Siege double high wrap now :cool:

19_Skier
07-06-2012, 01:09 PM
Deep V handle is a must.

1. Arms Straight
2. Knees Bent
3. Ski tip out of the water.
4. Let the boat pull you up, i.e., don't try to stand up too fast.

Apart from that, if you have an old flat bottom wooden ski with a big metal fin, it helps. The wide skis aren't bad for getting up, but are miserable to ride.

Plenty will tell you that booms and extended pylons are great teaching tools. To each their own. I have never bothered with them. We have had plenty of success with the four simple instructions and trainer handles and have never bothered with anything else.

I transitioned my six year old from a rope attached to the trainer skis to an ordinary handle yesterday. Four simple instructions. He fell the first time and got up on the second try. He fell in the turn-around at the end of the lake and got up again with no trouble.


I actually learned off a boom this summer. Did 6 attempts on the boom, it really helped practice posture and the "feel" of getting up on a slalom. I got up, first try behind the boat after this (15 off on pylon). It is a great tool if you have one available but I don't think I would spend the extra money just to have it.

JohnnyB, that's great to hear about your daughter, you sound like a really proud dad!

Jorski
07-10-2012, 02:13 PM
My kids each learned at 10, don't worry, the kids are plenty strong enough.

One key thing that I learned while teaching my kids, is to have enough of the ski out of the water.

If they have just the tip barely peaking out, it is very easy for them to get pulled too far forward and to be pulled over the front of the ski.

If they have enough ski out of the water, so that the toes of the front foot are just below the water's surface, when the pull comes the ski will flatten out right on top of the water.

Add to this:

Stay in a really tight ball
Arms straight, outside of knees
stand up once you are on top of the water.

If they do it right, it takes very little strength.