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View Full Version : Replacing break line and bleeding, advice needed


ntidsl
06-28-2012, 11:44 AM
So I will be replacing a leaking brake line and then bleeding the system. I have a mityvac (borrowed) which I have no experience with. I have confirmed that everything in my actuator system is actually working which is good. I noticed brake fluid though coming from the line that runs thru my trailer. I have a new line ready to go.

Any advise?

Also changing all lighting to LED but that will be a cinch!

I'll be ready for the road!!!

ntidsl
07-02-2012, 08:59 AM
So this weekend I replaced a busted line, cleaned out and bled everything with a mity vac, then bled again manually. Actuator is working perfectly...but still no brakes...frozen calipers? Do i have to replace or just free and clean up?

jab
07-02-2012, 09:46 AM
Find a rubber stopper at the hardware store that will fit in your break fluid reservoir , drill a hole in it and use an air compressor at about 10-15psi. It takes two people, fill the reservoir with fluid, the first person needs to pressurize it. The second person will bleed the lines while the system is under pressure, this will push any bubbles through. Only open the bleed screws one at a time, closest one to the reservoir first, while the system is pressurized to prevent any air from back flowing through the bleed screw. A 1/4" hose can be used to run the fluid from the bleed screw to a container. I couldn't get a vacuum to work reliably, but this method did.

ntidsl
07-02-2012, 10:48 AM
I am sure my lines are bubble free. I bled more than sufficiently. I actually bled with regular brake fluid...a whole quart...then with synthetic and waited until the synthetic got to the bleed valves...two quarts...i think the calipers are just frozen from not being used in years...I'll check.

mikeg205
07-02-2012, 11:37 AM
Find a rubber stopper at the hardware store that will fit in your break fluid reservoir , drill a hole in it and use an air compressor at about 10-15psi. It takes two people, fill the reservoir with fluid, the first person needs to pressurize it. The second person will bleed the lines while the system is under pressure, this will push any bubbles through. Only open the bleed screws one at a time, closest one to the reservoir first, while the system is pressurized to prevent any air from back flowing through the bleed screw. A 1/4" hose can be used to run the fluid from the bleed screw to a container. I couldn't get a vacuum to work reliably, but this method did.

duh...so simple...