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IdahoSnake
06-21-2012, 12:24 PM
I am looking at getting the bearings repacked on my single axel trailer and the tire store wants to charge me $105 to do it. I have looked around at it appears that new seals only cost about $5. I have never done this before on any trailer but might give it a go. Any tips, special tools needed, or should I just pony up the cash and save the hassel?

Sorry if this has already been covered but I did not find another thread on this.

Any help is appreciated.

psychobilly
06-21-2012, 01:10 PM
When repacking them be sure NOT to mix them up. Make sure you keep the bearing with the race that it has been riding in, don't mix them up. Usually if you do one wheel at a time there's not much chance as they are usually 2 different sizes. If you get gung ho and pull everything apart, clean everything, pack them and then go back together you can get them mixed up and that ain't good.

You may want to get you a seal puller, but a screw driver will work. There is a thread in here on this as we all have discussed this before as I remember posting a pic of a seal puller. You just have to read through a bunch of threads. That's the best part about researching a project on here. The amount of reading you have to actually do to find what you're looking for, you actually end up learning about other things.

Miss Rita
06-21-2012, 03:56 PM
Here's a link that should help:

http://www.championtrailers.com/techsup.html (http://http://championtrailers.com/techsup.html#packhubs)

mayo93prostar
06-21-2012, 04:52 PM
if you are just repacking, it is pretty easy and you need to replace the bearing seals on the inside of the hub. I have a seal puller tool that makes it easy but a pair of pliers may work also. You could also replace the bearings and the races but this is more work and may require a press for the races.

mayo93prostar
06-21-2012, 04:53 PM
Here's a link that should help:

http://www.championtrailers.com/techsup.html (http://http://championtrailers.com/techsup.html#packhubs)

the link did not work for me

charrison327
06-22-2012, 10:00 AM
try........

championtrailers.com/techsup.html#packhubs

had to take out all the http stuff to get it to work.

Philscbx
06-22-2012, 11:38 AM
I have never done this before on any trailer but might give it a go.
Any tips, special tools needed, or should I just pony up the cash and save the hassel?
It's pretty straight forward after everything is clean - but it's cleaning that can be a challenge getting all parts down to a clean surface as if out of the box.

Print out the assembly from the links provided & this to have handy.

If the grease is fairly clean looking inside the hubs - it's a good sign.
If it's rusty colored - water present - close inspection is needed.

The best results solvent in the shop here is Napatha -
HomeDepot and others have this in quarts and gallons - very cheap / clean / evaporates nice / blows dry.
Unlike paint thinner which is too oily.

Contact Cleaner can be used after scrubbed clean -
but it's not that effective on thick grease - and the fumes would not be good.

Go into the painting supply cabinet - select a 2"-3" paint brush -
With wire cutting dikes - trim the brush hair to a pointed shape - the shorter the stiffer.
Modified cut is trimming the outer hairs shorter than the center.

A coffee can is about right to place the bearings in - the brush stabbing at them in solvent will work well.
Extra long needle nose pliers work well to hold them while scrubbing them.
Blow them dry - touch them up with final scrub if needed.
With air hose - try not to spin them up. A rag in hand with bearing in it works well on final blow dry.

A cardboard box works well holding them inside to blow them dry so solvent & grease doesn't fly about the shop or driveway.

The hubs can lay in a clean oil drain pan - scoop out the bulk of grease - then brush them clean.
Blow clean with them standing in box.

The rear seal can be removed - before or after - usually before.
The seal can be removed either with large screw driver placed in the hole under edge of seal -
then pried out against side of hub.

Or knocked out from the inside - entering in from the other end with dowel or the screw driver. I try not to wreck them just incase the wrong seals were received & possible delay getting the right ones when the application is odd mfg.
You will be fine here for standard trailer.

Now that bearings are clean -
this is where a close look at each individual rollers on each bearing need to be free of any scoring / pits /
any marking of dis-colored dark zones like it was over heated or rust.
Simply roll the bearing cage around letting the rollers expose 360 as they roll.

Now the axle - clean it as well.
Can place cardboard under area 3x3 with drain pan under axle to clean it.

If it still looks like new - it's good to go.
Any damage noticed on bearings - then that bearing and the race it sits in needs to be replaced.

Inspect the axle where the seal rides - to see if any deep wear ridges from sand wore into it. Place the new seal from the box it came in over this spot to make sure it has a decent snug fit. This is where water will enter when launching the boat.

We'll leave it at that for now when your ready for next process.

This is also a good time to inspect the brakes - if it has them.
Check the brake fluid - roll up paper towel so it can enter the master cylinder -
place one end of towel down into the fluid to the bottom and remove.
If it comes out clean - you win.
We'll see what you found.

If working on concrete - should be just fine with trailer on jack stands.
If on asphalt - place plywood under stands - or they will sink in.
A short stool is real handy to sit at working on the axle.

Take images - of details - it's your new personal manual.
So have fun & Good Luck.

I'll add - simply put the used solvent in with the drain oil jugs.

Stx221
06-22-2012, 12:02 PM
What a great write up, thanks for posting that! I am planning to pull the wheels and hubs on my 1995 trailer this afternoon and some of the tips and tricks in there will be handy, such as the paint brush cut down for cleaning the bearings. Otherwise I was planning on a very similar process!

rjracin240
06-22-2012, 01:12 PM
Couple things to add to PHILSCB post. Dont use compressed air to spin the bearings, sounds cool but dont do it!!!! Can cause the bearings to fail, if you use compressed air to blow the solvent out insure you hold the bearing cage to prevent it from spinning.


The other point is technique, to remove inner seal thread retaining nut back on then put hub back in and catch edge of seal/bearing on inner side of nut, seal will pop off with usually no damage

Miss Rita
06-22-2012, 04:06 PM
Re cleaning bearings: I recently bought a set of new Timken bearings under duress for almost $30. Once they were installed I bought another set at Autozone, $11. It begs the question of whether it's just better to buy another set of $11 bearings each time, or clean the $30 bearing set. Considering the time and mess involved with cleaning bearings, I'd be inclined to get a fresh set each time.

Any mechanic-types here have an opinion on buying bearings made in China v the Timkens?

ctjahn
06-22-2012, 04:25 PM
Re cleaning bearings: I recently bought a set of new Timken bearings under duress for almost $30. Once they were installed I bought another set at Autozone, $11. It begs the question of whether it's just better to buy another set of $11 bearings each time, or clean the $30 bearing set. Considering the time and mess involved with cleaning bearings, I'd be inclined to get a fresh set each time.

Any mechanic-types here have an opinion on buying bearings made in China v the Timkens?

I am trying the cheap China bearings (AND trying Green Grease; and bearing buddies on new hubs, bearings, seals, etc installed this winter for the 78 S&S while carrying a spare set: Axle, Hub, Bearings, Races, etc = LINK: http://www.greengrease.net/)... Made it on the first four hour tow with no issues........................yet) - Synthetic.

Historically I used the blue marine stuff for Boat trailers and Lucas for the racecar trailers. I agree with the PROPER procedure noted above but I just re-pack em with grease pushing the old stuff out unless I am changing compounds/brands/etc - Lazy? I guess but it has worked for racecars and trailers for 15-20 years....(KNOCK ON WOOD) BUT I should note your mileage may vary and/or I replace bearings at the first sign of necessity when doing routine maint, and I dont condone what I do; AND if in doubt go with Timken; they have never done me wrong...

Best of luck
cj

IdahoSnake
06-22-2012, 08:26 PM
Thanks for the info. Going to give it a go tonight. Will post results.

mwg
06-22-2012, 09:35 PM
Couple things to add to PHILSCB post. Dont use compressed air to spin the bearings, sounds cool but dont do it!!!! Can cause the bearings to fail, if you use compressed air to blow the solvent out insure you hold the bearing cage to prevent it from spinning.


Found that out the hard way in high school.. I got a scar almost all the around my pinky finger to show for it... and I have to buy a new bearing.

Philscbx
06-23-2012, 08:29 PM
Found that out the hard way in high school.. I got a scar almost all the around my pinky finger to show for it... and I have to buy a new bearing.Very Possible - we used to take good shape ball bearings when kids at the shop - and with 160psi, you can get ball bearings up to maybe 200,000 rpm - set them down - and non stop burn out of sparks.
An open cage roller bearing is dangerous where it's now a roll of bullets ready to escape.

Jerseydave
06-23-2012, 10:57 PM
Just to add another twist......I have used the EZ squeeze bearing packer for years (30+) and it is the best $20 you can spend if you work on wheel bearings.

http://atoztool.com/270.html

Makes quick, clean work of packing bearings. Don't expect to just push down on it with your hand however, you usually have to stand on it because the grease is so thick.

Also, on my Loadrite trailer from a few years back it came with bearings made in China.
All of those bearing showed excess wear and pitting after the first year of use. I'll stick with Timkens.

Philscbx
06-24-2012, 08:56 AM
I have used the EZ squeeze bearing packer for years (30+) and it is the best $20 you can spend if you work on wheel bearings.
http://atoztool.com/270.html
Makes quick, clean work of packing bearings.Bearing packers really does make the chore easier.
Vs a wad of grease in the palm, forcing little by little into the bearing.

IdahoSnake
06-25-2012, 11:49 AM
Mission complete. Hardest part was finding the correct seal. I did not reattach the trailer breaks. Did not have time and just don’t need them. Also put on some new tires. The job was not that bad really. 1st hub took about 3 times as long as the 2nd one just from the learning curve. Bearings looked great and they did not need repacking but it was more for the POM.

Thanks for the help with the comments.

mtajpa
06-29-2012, 01:45 AM
Mission complete. Hardest part was finding the correct seal. I did not reattach the trailer breaks. Did not have time and just donít need them. Also put on some new tires. The job was not that bad really. 1st hub took about 3 times as long as the 2nd one just from the learning curve. Bearings looked great and they did not need repacking but it was more for the POM.

Thanks for the help with the comments.

" I did not reattach the trailer breaks. " ?????

How did you address not installing the brakes? If you left the shoes off then the first time you try to stop the surge brake acuator will push the brake fluid into the wheel cylinder and then push the piston out causing all the brake fluid to leak out. Then the acuator will have a bunch of slop in it.

Stx221
07-02-2012, 05:06 PM
After my wheel bearing repacking, I just put about 900 miles on the trailer this past week/weekend and all was well and functioned flawlessly.

I need to bleed the brake lines in a serious way with fresh fluid now though!

IdahoSnake
07-03-2012, 01:10 PM
It rides the exact same as when the breaks were attached. After a stop it slams back when I go, I hate it. I am going to put a bult through it to "lock" it in place.

russlars
07-03-2012, 03:34 PM
Just for reference, I just had Les Schwab Tires repack my tandem axle trailer bearings. The repacking with new seals and sales tax came to $175. I have bearing buddies that I squirt grease into several times a year but feel like it is good maintenance to completely repack them every 2-3 years.

mtajpa
07-04-2012, 09:00 PM
It rides the exact same as when the breaks were attached. After a stop it slams back when I go, I hate it. I am going to put a bult through it to "lock" it in place.

Sounds like your actuator needs some help. He is a source for information.
http://www.ufpnet.com/Portals/0/PDFs/A-60,%2075%20_%2084%20Actuator%20Maintenance.pdf
Are your brakes drum or disk?

Jerseydave
07-04-2012, 09:40 PM
http://www.towingworld.com/articles/TowingLaws.htm

^ trailer brake requirements for all states. Hope you don't tow too far and have a nice heavy tow vehicle while towing that 205. Just sayin'

Philscbx
07-05-2012, 01:46 AM
I'd never want to be in a half ton vehicle with their small brakes and have no tailer brakes and have it push it through a stop sign or panic needed escape.

A guy not familiar with this - did so with a F150 & heavy trailer load that forced him off the curve and took out the whole end my friends home at leach lake Mn just missing their daughter who was in that room a moment before.

IdahoSnake
07-05-2012, 11:26 AM
Have a '11 dodge diesel as a tow rig and stops it just fine. Only tow about 10 miles each way. I will work on the trailer and see if it will ride smoother with the brakes back on before my next long tow. Thanks for the link.
Breaks are disk.

IdahoSnake
07-05-2012, 12:03 PM
Russ - I talked with a guy at a hub/trailer store when I got my new seals and he said that the bearing buddies do not grease the inside bearing at all. Just an FYI.

Philscbx
07-05-2012, 12:25 PM
For the most part - that's true - the buddie can only add as grease moves out of the way of outer bearing.

As the hub warms up - grease will get to inside bearing.
Usually just before mounting outer bearing - I'll take gear lube and back fill the hub till it starts to come out,
then assemble - buddie or not.