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View Full Version : how do you get your xstar on the trailer?


Dan2060
06-19-2012, 10:20 AM
Ok, peeps. I hate to admit it, but I have he** getting my xstar on the trailer. I came from a runabout and could load it with my eyes closed. I understand this comes from the fact that the outdrive is easier to manuever than the x stars rudder.
I've tried gentle power off/on to help steering, putting the wheel wells 2 inches under water, etc.

Any tips would be great. How deep do you put your trailer, how do you steer, etc.

Jason.H.
06-19-2012, 10:48 AM
Well I dont have an x-star but when getting my tristar out I barely put my trailer in the water. I have a single axle mastercraft trailer and I put it in until the water is level or just under the front foot step on the trailer in front of the wheel well. This makes the top of the wheel well probably three inches out of water. If I go in any deep the nose of the bow hits the front pulley instead of riding over it and/or the toe ring hit the v-bunk. I also soak my bunks with liquid rollers (spray can product) pretty often. So next time try putting the trailer in a little shallower.

Jason.H.
06-19-2012, 10:51 AM
Oh, and I also power the boat up the trailer and have someone on the dock tell me when the toe eye gets to the front roller. Slow and steady is key. Il then leave in just slightly on power so it doesnt slide back into the water and il climb over the front and hook up the strap. Ive tried just winching it up but it feels like the winch is going to rip the tow eye through the hull haha.

mzimme
06-19-2012, 11:30 AM
What is it that's giving you problems? Lining the boat up? Getting it all the way on the trailer? Steering issues?


When I put my boat on, I'll bring the trailer into the water (I found on my ramp it's easier dunking the fenders about 2-3" under water) then when I drive the boat on, I start a little ways out to get my path down. I'll slowly idle forward, then click throttle back to neutral, back to forward idle, back to neutral, and keep doing that so I have steering control. I barely leave it on power doing this to control my speed, and just drive the nose as center up the trailer as I can. Once the boat starts resting on the bunks, it starts leveling itself on the trailer, and I'll give the boat power to push it up into position. I'll then leave the power forward enough to not slide back down the trailer, and buckle everything I need to buckle up at the bow, climb back over the windshield, shut her down, and signal to drive to pull me out.

It definitely took some practice, but once you get it these things are a dream to load compared to some other boats. I also don't have an X-star, but the DD/VD's are all pretty similar when loading/unloading.

As a side note, when I unload the boat I try to always line my boat up with the dock on port side since when you power off the boat naturally pulls starboard. Gives me a little extra maneuvering room, since I have pretty much zero control in reverse.

kal_dude
06-19-2012, 12:08 PM
float the boat on the trailer!!! works EVERYTIME!! unless you want to look like a wally!?!?

02ProstarSammyD
06-19-2012, 12:28 PM
^what I do. I get my trailer pretty deep and have mine sprayed with liquid gold. I get her in and slightly floating, crank her up, and pull off. Only problem I ever had doing this was jacked up a transom transducer which shouldn't be on the boat in the first place. Takes about 1 minute to get her in and out. Find out what depth works for you, mentally mark your tire depth on the tow vehicle, and rinse/repeat. If you are new try to get an end ramp so you are open on one side or the other just to relieve stress.
Ive tried just winching it up but it feels like the winch is going to rip the tow eye through the hull haha.
You need to get deeper then. The boat will settle into place as you pull up. Liquid roller ftw. I hate powering into it but I also hate the idea of doing that on the beach
since I have pretty much zero control in reverse.

yea we have a long dock too. When unloading I let the others pull the boat to the very end of the dock while I park so there is no issues with trying to back out between 2 long docks and another line of boats.

Jason.H.
06-19-2012, 01:11 PM
SammyD I think I just have a bad trailer design or something. I have tried putting it in deeper but when i do the nose of the boat hits the roller and stops instead of going over it. Same thing with the toe strap eye, it hits the v-bunk and stops the boat. I have tried putting it in REALLY deep too, like tow vehicle back tires a foot in the water and same result. I think i should just buy a new trailer. The new ones seem to be designed better, like the v bunk has a gap in the center for the tow eye to pass through.

BMcD
06-19-2012, 01:42 PM
Hey Jason,

It may be that you are putting the trailer in too deep (not sure if anyone has said this), especially if your Xstar has the SuperFly bow. I have an X45 and it took me a little while to get used to the trailer position coming from a traditional bow shape. I found that if I put my nerves aside and leave the trailer a bit further out of the water than I would have for prior boats, I can power straight up the trailer without an issue. The bunks guide me right in as they should.

When I first started out, before I realized my error, I was finding that the nose of the bow wasn't clearing the roller.

Just my 2 cents,
BMcD

Day1 (http://www.liveday1.com) Wakesurfers

pmkkdx
06-19-2012, 02:09 PM
A whole lot depends on the steepness/flatness of the ramp being used keep in mind. I have a '04 X2 on a tandem CA built trailer, and 98% of the ramps I have used I leave just a bit of the top leading edge of the trailer fender showing above the water, maybe an inch (see elipse in attached picture). The back end of the boat is usually barely floating... same with loading, the boat comes in, contacts the bunks, glides forward up to about a foot from my orange roller (replaced boat buddy), slap the winch stap on and power forward till it touches the roller, tighten winch strap, pull up ramp.

mzimme description of lining up a little ways out using power, neutral, power, neutral, just bumping for a second or two for steering ... seems to help with line up coming to the trailer and not coming in too hot either. My wife actually takes the boat both unloading & loading and I am in charge of the trailer.

ttu
06-19-2012, 02:13 PM
A whole lot depends on the steepness/flatness of the ramp being used keep in mind. I have a '04 X2 on a tandem CA built trailer, and 98% of the ramps I have used I leave just a bit of the top leading edge of the trailer fender showing above the water, maybe an inch (see elipse in attached picture). The back end of the boat is usually barely floating... same with loading, the boat comes in, contacts the bunks, glides forward up to about a foot from my orange roller (replaced boat buddy), slap the winch stap on and power forward till it touches the roller, tighten winch strap, pull up ramp.

mzimme description of lining up a little ways out using power, neutral, power, neutral, just bumping for a second or two for steering ... seems to help with line up coming to the trailer and not coming in too hot either. My wife actually takes the boat both unloading & loading and I am in charge of the trailer.

i do about the same depth as above. i have a 07 x2 with a mc trailer and i get the nose inside the guide poles and boat settles on the bunks. from there i drive forward to the boat buddy and out we go.

Jerseydave
06-19-2012, 02:24 PM
I've owned 5 different inboards and the X-star is a whole different animal when it comes to loading her on the trailer. (because of the pickle fork bow)

You can power load as suggested only if the ramp is not too steep, otherwise the flat part of the bow tries to go under the boat buddy, plus the boat hits the spare tire too. If the ramp is not steep, put your trailer in so the fenders are just barely under water.

On steeper ramps (like ours) I put the trailer in deep so my suburban's tailpipe is just starting to blow bubbles, then I float it on and winch it the final 1-2 feet. I usually have someone in the back of the boat as I pull out to make sure it's centered between the guide poles. Most of the time it centers itself pretty well.

With most boats with a V-shaped bow just power load and you're done. Takes 30 seconds tops.

What year is your X-star?

langedp
06-19-2012, 10:34 PM
Here in Michigan most ramps don't allow power loading nor do I find it necessary. I back the trailer in pretty deep until the fenders are submerged, and float my X-Star onto the trailer. I only have to winch it a couple of feet and it's not a hard pull. I put a Stoltz bow roller on the trailer and that helps also. A slow pull up the ramp with the truck and the boat centers itself on the bunks and life is good. 2007 X-Star and MC Trailer.

Dan2060
06-21-2012, 06:19 PM
2004 xstar

Dan2060
06-21-2012, 06:22 PM
I have found that with power is how you steer, but then you come in hot sometimes. No power you drift sideways....
I've tried fenders under water and if you don't line up perfectly on the approach, it rattles its way into position. I've torn the middle bunks up twice and had to replace, when it was to shallow.

We boat all over, so the angle of the ramps changes constantly...

WESSTAR
06-22-2012, 05:27 PM
What kind of trailer do you have? I have a SBT and have to have the rear wheels of my truck touching the water than slowly float it on then you have to crank it up and may have to have who ever is driving the truck move it deeper or shallower to get it just right. Then I climb it the boat and head to the back and hold on to the Guides and make sure the boat goes on straight. It is easy once you get some seat time and get your wife or buddy trained up on the proper trailer placement.

Dan2060
06-22-2012, 05:43 PM
What kind of trailer do you have? I have a SBT and have to have the rear wheels of my truck touching the water than slowly float it on then you have to crank it up and may have to have who ever is driving the truck move it deeper or shallower to get it just right. Then I climb it the boat and head to the back and hold on to the Guides and make sure the boat goes on straight. It is easy once you get some seat time and get your wife or buddy trained up on the proper trailer placement.


I don't know what the trailer as far as brand. It is whatever was sold from Mastercraft in 2004. I don't know if they have used more than one company in producing trailers for them.

I have used your technique and that works, but I was hoping for a secret that would allow me to stay dry and put it in all in one motion, like my old boat. May just be a product of the rudder and v drive combo.

Josh S
12-07-2012, 12:16 AM
I'm happy I found this post. I know it old but it helped a lot. I have had a few boats and never really had any problems loading them. But since I bought my x-35 I have had a few problems. But with the pickle fork bow it has kicked my butt a few times. Really makes you look like you should even have a boat sometimes. But I'm going to try floating it on more. I notice its harder the steper the ramp.

thatsmrmastercraft
12-07-2012, 12:23 AM
Steep ramps are always the most difficult. Practice when it's not busy at the ramp to find the best depth to have your trailer in the water. Most problems come from having the trailer in too far. Good luck.

tdelong
12-07-2012, 01:00 PM
I work at a pro shop with a launch and after seeing this issue many many times Ill add this piece of advice: If you have a big boat, or a little truck, or the trailer wheels maybe get stuck on the start of the concrete ramp, the 350 horsepower engine on your boat can really help your tow vehicle out. Just give the boat some power to help push the thing outta the water.

Just in case this isn't obvious to everyone: 1. Make sure to shut the engine off and prop off before leaving the water. Honestly, as soon as the truck starts moving would be okay to shut it down. This tip is just to get it moving. 2. Not much power is needed...at all! This is really just meant to make the boat feel lighter on the trailer and the truck should still be the main tool. just a little bit helps more than you would think

Most common use for this application occurs when a smaller vehicle backs in deep enough to float the boat on, wheels get wet, and then you start slipping.

tdelong
12-07-2012, 01:15 PM
This is how you launch a boat.

http://www.wakeworld.com/forum/showthread.php?t=796355

mlawler34
12-07-2012, 01:42 PM
On steeper ramps (like ours) I put the trailer in deep so my suburban's tailpipe is just starting to blow bubbles, then I float it on and winch it the final 1-2 feet. I usually have someone in the back of the boat as I pull out to make sure it's centered between the guide poles. Most of the time it centers itself pretty well.

I am doing the exact same thing. Both ramps that I use are steep. The only way to do it is back in deep. I am not comfortable power loading and I refuse to do it because I have seen first hand in Michigan what it can do to the ramps.

I have also had the problem where the bow comes in and is not above the boat buddy or roller, due to the water level this year and the fact I ran out of ramp (thank you power loaders). This will sound kind of crazy, but its actually not that hard or straining. In this situation, i winch it right up to my bow roller, then i put on shoulder underneath the picklefork and gently lift it up over the roller as i winch it the rest of the way. Honestly, really easy even with my back issues.

strad
12-07-2012, 06:54 PM
Previous owners of mine power loaded. And the bottom of the boat has the scuff marks to prove it. Additionally, the boat Nevada handbook specifically says not to do it, since doing so can build up a ridge of silt/mud to wing props on when approaching the ramp. I vastly prefer the float on method.