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Rockman
05-12-2012, 10:28 PM
Had some extra time this weekend and decided to ditch the normal crappy bamboo tiki torches that have been a pita since we bought our house.

With the deck done last summer, I thought we needed some "churchin' up!" :D


John E- This one is for you!

Rockman
05-12-2012, 10:29 PM
And a few for the tables...;)

CantRepeat
05-13-2012, 07:47 AM
That's pretty cool. I wonder how the #7 labels will hold up to the weather.

mlawler34
05-13-2012, 08:46 AM
These are fricken sweet. Where did you get the brackets? I definitely need to make some for the GFs parents lake house.

2RLAKE
05-13-2012, 08:53 AM
You are a good man to sacrifice yourself by emptying those bottles!

2RLAKE
05-13-2012, 08:54 AM
What do you use for the cork?

mtajpa
05-13-2012, 10:04 AM
That's pretty cool. I wonder how the #7 labels will hold up to the weather.

I sure he is working emptying on the replacements.:rolleyes:

tex
05-13-2012, 10:12 AM
Sweet!!!

Rockman
05-13-2012, 11:59 AM
That's pretty cool. I wonder how the #7 labels will hold up to the weather.

I am going to put a coat of clear coat that we use on bar tops one one and see how that holds up. Another thought would be to use the wide pacling tape for packages and place tha over the labels.

Otherwise, we will have to drink more to get more bottles!;)



I was also thinking that once the labels do come off, get the colored citro oil to burn and then they will somewhat glow in the bottle.

Rockman
05-13-2012, 12:01 PM
These are fricken sweet. Where did you get the brackets? I definitely need to make some for the GFs parents lake house.

We are gonna be out all day but I will post a complete parts list and prices for these in case anyone wants to make them. Very cheap to do.

All parts were purchased between Menards and Home Depot. Neither store had everything I needed due to the types of brackets they each sell.

Rockman
05-13-2012, 12:03 PM
You are a good man to sacrifice yourself by emptying those bottles!

We are trying our damnest...lol



The cork...that is something I found online that one guy did but have a better solution as I found only one flaw in the current setup. The current way I did it will work but not make me completely happy.

More to come...

CruisinGA
05-13-2012, 12:54 PM
I think they would look great (better?) without the labels, so no worries if/when they do come off!

CantRepeat
05-13-2012, 02:50 PM
I think they would look great (better?) without the labels, so no worries if/when they do come off!

Yup, either way is gonna look good.

mikeg205
05-13-2012, 05:32 PM
Just make sure you don't get any of this near the flames... :)

http://www.tias.com/8282/PictPage/3923946079.html

Let me know if you need recruits to help empty some bottles I live close by... :)

Rockman
05-13-2012, 11:34 PM
I did find this idea for the bottle holders on line so I am not taking full credit for the idea…but I did not find any examples using Jack bottles so I guess the idea is partly mine.:D


Basic overall cost of the materials is about $6.00…which does not include the bottle of wine or Jack.;)



Wine bottle assembly:

I included photos of the parts used for wine bottle holders. The components for the using wine bottles vs. Jack bottles are almost, but not the same. The main difference is the collar used (wine bottle neck is skinny, Jack bottle neck is wider) and also the direction the bolt is used in the assembly. The bolt in the wine bottle assembly faces outward from the metal plate whereas in the Jack assembly, the bolt faces inward toward your deck post.

Assemble pieces as shown in the picture.

The bolt for the wine bottle assembly…I found it best to just but a 5” bolt than mess around with a 6’ piece with both ends cut off and have to cut the 6’ piece to desired length. Overall cost is minimal by using the pre-cut hex bolts.

Screw the plate to your deck post. With this assembly, you will need to notch out your post a bit so the head of the bolt has clearance and the plate will sit flush against the post.

Tighten bolts as needed to make the assembly as tight as you can get it. This does take some tweaking to get it just right.

Add the empty wine bottle to the collar and tighten enough so you do not break the glass.

Fill the bottle with citronella oil about 80% full and then insert the copper pipe assembly in the top of the bottle. The copper pipe is used to keep the wick straight and also to keep the wick away from the sides of the bottle. The washer keeps the copper piece from falling into the bottle. When I cut the copper pipe stub, there was a bit of a lip on the pipe after the cut. I then used a hammer to softly tap the reduced onto the pipe. This reducer took the copper pipe from ½” to 3/8” inches which keeps the wick tight.


Make sure wick is about ½” inch above the top of the copper pipe. Light ‘em up!

Rockman
05-13-2012, 11:37 PM
Jack bottle assembly:

I used a different collar found in the electrical department at Menards for the Jack bottles.

Screw the plate to your deck post. With this assembly, you will NOT need to notch out your post behind the metal plate.

The 5” bolt goes through the back of the collar and then screws into the plate attached to your deck post. Use nuts to keep the assembly tight. I had to drill the center of the collar out a bit to fit the 3/8” bolt through.

Tighten bolts as needed to make the assembly as tight as you can get it. This does take some tweaking to get it just right.

Add the empty Jack bottle to the collar and tighten enough so you do not break the glass.

Fill the empty Jack bottle with citronella oil about 80% full and then insert the copper pipe assembly in the top of the bottle. The copper pipe is used to keep the wick straight and also to keep the wick away from the sides of the bottle. The washer keeps the copper piece from falling into the bottle. When I cut the copper pipe stub, there was a bit of a lip on the pipe after the cut. I then used a hammer to softly tap the reduced onto the pipe. This reducer took the copper pipe from ½” to 3/8” inches which keeps the wick tight.

Make sure wick is about ½” inch above the top of the copper pipe. Light ‘em up!

Rockman
05-13-2012, 11:41 PM
Just make sure you don't get any of this near the flames... :)

http://www.tias.com/8282/PictPage/3923946079.html

Let me know if you need recruits to help empty some bottles I live close by... :)

NICE!!!!:D

mikeg205
05-13-2012, 11:50 PM
well it's now documented... kinda...sounds like something you should patent and sell on www.rockmanparty.com

Table Rocker
05-14-2012, 12:24 AM
Well done and more importantly, well shared on TeamTalk. The lake house will be getting some of these this spring.

You may already do this, but a 3/8 copper cap would make a good lid for the wick when not in use.
http://images.orgill.com/200x200/6968143.jpg

mikeg205
05-14-2012, 08:03 AM
Well done and more importantly, well shared on TeamTalk. The lake house will be getting some of these this spring.

You may already do this, but a 3/8 copper cap would make a good lid for the wick when not in use.
http://images.orgill.com/200x200/6968143.jpg

Way to go...invented and already innovating!!!

aquaman
05-14-2012, 08:31 AM
Have you tried burning them for a few hours......?

I wonder how the bottles will hold up, once that copper tube warms up a bit ? :confused:

Rockman
05-14-2012, 08:40 AM
Have you tried burning them for a few hours......?

I wonder how the bottles will hold up, once that copper tube warms up a bit ? :confused:

Yes, we burned them last night.

The copper tube does not get hot as only the wick above the copper is near the flame.

The copper itself was not hot. I will check again this weekend and report back.

Rockman
05-14-2012, 08:42 AM
Well done and more importantly, well shared on TeamTalk. The lake house will be getting some of these this spring.

You may already do this, but a 3/8 copper cap would make a good lid for the wick when not in use.
http://images.orgill.com/200x200/6968143.jpg

We did pick up these but haven't used them yet.

I was trying to use the old wooden covers from our tiki torches at least to estinguish them at first but the copper top would be the best for coverage during the rain.

CantRepeat
05-14-2012, 08:57 AM
In your first photo, against the back wall, is that one of those propane mosquito repellers/killers?

If so, how well does it work?

Rockman
05-14-2012, 01:02 PM
In your first photo, against the back wall, is that one of those propane mosquito repellers/killers?

If so, how well does it work?

No, it's just an outdoor heater.

They were on sale for $99 then I got a $50 rebate so it only cost $50. I had an extra propane tank so figured, what the heck, gave it a try.

It does work nice when there is little wind and doesn't use as much as propane as I thought.

We only used it twice so far. First time worked great with just the family. Second time had people over and went out on the deck and the damn thing was on and no one was there...just beating the environment. :mad: