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hcoog17
04-22-2012, 12:43 PM
I was doing a little working and cleaning on my 2006 X30 last night. I noticed that the strut bearing(?) had traveled up the shaft slightly. I was able to slide it back in the strut very easily with my hand.

My question is, is this something that should move easily? Should there be a retainer on here to keep it in place?

Thanks in advance, Brad.

vogelm1
04-22-2012, 12:46 PM
Something is not right. Those are interference fit and need to be driven in, so no retainers. If you were able to slide it back in with your hand something tells me the wrong size was possibly installed.

mikeg205
04-22-2012, 01:41 PM
time to replace it...

89BigBlock
04-22-2012, 02:01 PM
^ yep. These are pressed in. Worn out or wrong part.

petermegan
04-22-2012, 10:19 PM
It would be a real bummer if the bearing started spinning in the strut. Needs replacing.

mikeg205
04-22-2012, 11:42 PM
9 bolts - 8 for the strut, 1 for the prop... pull strut, take out old beadings...replace with new...replace strut - replace prop - go have fun... :)

hcoog17
04-24-2012, 01:11 PM
Interesting, I did not think about removing the strut. My first thought was that I would need to remove the shaft and leave the strut in place. If I removed the strut, would I need to do the engine aligent? That may be above my level of expertise. But I think I could remove the strut fairly easily.

Jorski
04-24-2012, 01:20 PM
I would be rather hesitant about removing the strut itself.

First, there is no reason to remove it.

Secondly, unless there is something wrong, there will be an incredibly strong adhesive also holding it on that will be very hard to remove.

MIskier
04-24-2012, 02:14 PM
Interesting, I did not think about removing the strut. My first thought was that I would need to remove the shaft and leave the strut in place. If I removed the strut, would I need to do the engine aligent? That may be above my level of expertise. But I think I could remove the strut fairly easily.

You can replace the bearing with the strut in place and just removing the shaft. Removing the strut is a serious pain because of the 5200 used to secure it, removing it usually takes some gel and fiberglass with it.

CantRepeat
04-24-2012, 02:44 PM
There is NO need to remove the strut and in fact that isn't what you should do.

Pull the prop, remove the shaft and install new bearings. Skidim.com carries them.

CantRepeat
04-24-2012, 02:45 PM
9 bolts - 8 for the strut, 1 for the prop... pull strut, take out old beadings...replace with new...replace strut - replace prop - go have fun... :)

There's the hard way, the easy way, and the right way. You went with the hard way. ;)

learjet2230
04-24-2012, 08:45 PM
I disagree with removing the shaft. The easy way to go is pull the strut. No special tools needed. To get the shaft out the coupler will have to be removed (special tools) and be repacked unless dripless. If dripless then you risk messing up the seal. I just did this on my Prostar and it was 2 hrs tops. This is removal, bearing removal, bearing install, and strut re-install. Have an extra set of hands to help pull it and re-torque it. Dont know if the X30 is Vdrive so that definately changes some things. No engine re-alignment is really needed after a strut re-install.....and you can use pure silicone as a sealant instead of the 3m 5200. Makes for an easier removal next time you do them. Just my 2cents

CantRepeat
04-24-2012, 08:51 PM
Issue with removing the strut is now you have to do a deal with strut alignment on top of a possible prop shaft alignment.

learjet2230
04-24-2012, 08:56 PM
Issue with removing the strut is now you have to do a deal with strut alignment on top of a possible prop shaft alignment.

The strut will align to the shaft just fine, especially with new bearings.

CantRepeat
04-24-2012, 10:01 PM
The strut will align to the shaft just fine, especially with new bearings.

Well, not when I have replaced struts. The holes are still kind of large and the strut will need aligned. Struts do no magically align then selves. While it is not hard it surely is an unnecessary step in replacing strut bearings.

It seems like a pretty simple choice and I'm sure that dealers do not pull the strut out of a boat to replace bearings for a reason. Prop nut, prop, 4 bolts on the coupler, pop out the shaft vs prop nut, prop, getting in under the motor and taking out 8 bolts that you'd need a second person to hold either in or out to the boat, heat gun on the strut to break loose the 5200.

Sure there is more then one way to skin a cat, but.

learjet2230
04-25-2012, 02:48 PM
Well, not when I have replaced struts. The holes are still kind of large and the strut will need aligned. Struts do no magically align then selves. While it is not hard it surely is an unnecessary step in replacing strut bearings.

It seems like a pretty simple choice and I'm sure that dealers do not pull the strut out of a boat to replace bearings for a reason. Prop nut, prop, 4 bolts on the coupler, pop out the shaft vs prop nut, prop, getting in under the motor and taking out 8 bolts that you'd need a second person to hold either in or out to the boat, heat gun on the strut to break loose the 5200.

Sure there is more then one way to skin a cat, but.

yup!!...........I'm scratching my head here trying to figure out how you are going to take the shaft out with the coupler attached. You cant go up and out towards the trans with the strut installed. All the shaft removals I have done have been 4 coupler bolts, remove coupler and take shaft out "naked" through bottom. If I didnt want to take coupler or had a siezed one, then strut would have to come out so I could lift shaft vertically past trans and then out the top. Again I dont know what an X30 set-up is (vdrive vs direct) so I may not be "seeing" the whole picture. I do know that with a powerslot, its a whole lot easier to not deal with the coupler because there is very little space to slide the shaft back and get to the nut on the coupler. But im no expert!..cheers

Kyle
04-25-2012, 03:28 PM
I would not remove the strut. I hate dealing with 5200 and it's messy and a total PITA.


I would remove prop and 4 coupler bolts. Take the shaft nut loose on the coupler side.

Now for the "Poor White Trash" press for the coupler.
Take a socket and put it on the end of the shaft and reinstall the two couplers with a couple of the coupler bolts. Once tight loosen the coupler back up and install a deep well or a small extension in between the couplers and tighten again. It will eventually press the shaft out of the coupler. Both the coupler and shaft are keyed so there is no way to jack it up.

Pull shaft out from the bottom of the boat.


Another reason not to remove the strut is that you must let the 3m 5200 adhesive cure for 24 hours after you seal the strut to the hull. This means the 1.5 hour job takes 25.5 hours before play time. Taking the shaft out through the bottom may take 1.75-2 hours and a little more finess but after you are finished you can play the same day.

So 2 hour job vs 25.5 to 26 hour job.

CantRepeat
04-25-2012, 03:30 PM
The inside of the coupler is threaded. You use these tools to get the shaft out and takes maybe 2 inches of room. Takes 2 minutes. The X30 is a Vdrive, but on my 92 it was still the same process. You do not need to remove the strut, it's way more work then necessary.

MariStar-Man
04-25-2012, 03:35 PM
I bought one of these and it was a piece of cake. I was even able to straighten out the strut with a forcefull pull and the shaft allignment was perfect. I guess the PO just bumped the prop once and pushed the strut out of allignment ever so slightly.

http://www.skidim.com/prodinfo.asp?number=SHSBPULLERG

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zZ2mSH_Ncc&feature=player_embedded

Kyle
04-25-2012, 03:40 PM
The inside of the coupler is threaded. You use these tools to get the shaft out and takes maybe 2 inches of room. Takes 2 minutes. The X30 is a Vdrive, but on my 92 it was still the same process. You do not need to remove the strut, it's way more work then necessary.

Yeah yeah yeah in a perfect world those tools would be nice. I just didn't see the point in buying them to use one time. I thought about how to separate the two and came up with my PWT way that works. Yeah it takes probably 10-15 min but it's free and I don't have to add tools to my overloaded tool box that won't be used again.

CantRepeat
04-25-2012, 03:41 PM
I bought one of these and it was a piece of cake. I was even able to straighten out the strut with a forcefull pull and the shaft allignment was perfect. I guess the PO just bumped the prop once and pushed the strut out of allignment ever so slightly.

http://www.skidim.com/searchprods.asp

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zZ2mSH_Ncc&feature=player_embedded

I've got one too, nice tool.

CantRepeat
04-25-2012, 03:52 PM
yup!!...........I'm scratching my head here trying to figure out how you are going to take the shaft out with the coupler attached. You cant go up and out towards the trans with the strut installed. All the shaft removals I have done have been 4 coupler bolts, remove coupler and take shaft out "naked" through bottom. If I didnt want to take coupler or had a siezed one, then strut would have to come out so I could lift shaft vertically past trans and then out the top. Again I dont know what an X30 set-up is (vdrive vs direct) so I may not be "seeing" the whole picture. I do know that with a powerslot, its a whole lot easier to not deal with the coupler because there is very little space to slide the shaft back and get to the nut on the coupler. But im no expert!..cheers

You remove the coupler.

CantRepeat
04-25-2012, 04:15 PM
Yeah yeah yeah in a perfect world those tools would be nice. I just didn't see the point in buying them to use one time. I thought about how to separate the two and came up with my PWT way that works. Yeah it takes probably 10-15 min but it's free and I don't have to add tools to my overloaded tool box that won't be used again.

Kyle, I was posting to lear on how to get it out.

By whatever means, yours included, just remove the coupler and slide the shaft out.

MariStar-Man
04-25-2012, 04:51 PM
>>Heres a great thread here<< (http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=46536&highlight=bearing+replacement)

mikeg205
04-25-2012, 11:20 PM
I really don't see wanting to use the drive hammer to remove the bearings while the strut is on the boat. Even the video shows the strut off the boat. Strong opinions on this. -V- here went to change is bearings and is couple hour job became a major project. When I called an MC dealer they quoted $600 to do it. pull shaft, r&r bearings then re-align engine. Oh well lots to learn here... :D

CantRepeat
04-26-2012, 08:20 AM
I really don't see wanting to use the drive hammer to remove the bearings while the strut is on the boat. Even the video shows the strut off the boat. Strong opinions on this. -V- here went to change is bearings and is couple hour job became a major project. When I called an MC dealer they quoted $600 to do it. pull shaft, r&r bearings then re-align engine. Oh well lots to learn here... :D

The slide hammer work great for me for changing my bearings while the strut was still installed.

learjet2230
04-26-2012, 09:41 AM
Again, I just offer how I do it. Since my strut is siliconed on, no 5200 (for this purpose). It is much easier for me to remove the strut. It is such a pain to pull the coupler on my boat due to the Powerslot gear reduction bolted to the back of the trans. I can only slide the shaft back about an inch (maybe), and force the tooling in to get the coupler nut off. I know if you have a 1:1 or 1.23:1 there is plenty of room. Also a V-drive changes this as well. I also had to make special tools and I use "Kyle" method of pressing the shaft out. It works but is time consuming in my case. Either way he decides to do it there are benefits/drawbacks of each way on each type of boat to be done. Really if he wanted the easy method to fix his boat...as long as the existing bearing didnt spin in the strut and its not worn on the inside, he could slide it out and use Loctite 630 bearing retaining compound (green) and essentially "glue" it in until the end of season. Im sure some will slam this with all your might, but Im just offering the guy another option to think about.....cheers

frontiercdk
04-29-2012, 03:08 AM
Just to thrrow this in, the old style bushings are not "plastic" they are brass with a rubber liner. They "seem" to be better quality and I dont think they would back out like the plastic ones, any opinions?

EJ OJPROP
04-29-2012, 05:03 PM
The rubber bearings are not "better" quality. The "plastic" bearings we provide are self lubricated and offer less resistance to to the drive shaft which "equates" to a more "efficient" delivery of the of the power to the shaft.

Bearings of any material can and will back out due to a "variety" of reasons/causes.

frontiercdk
05-04-2012, 01:41 AM
"wow"

MariStar-Man
05-04-2012, 10:49 AM
"wow"

When one makes a decision on a particular type of product, one must have ALL the info...

Long wear life
Vesconite gives up to 10 times the service life of phosphor bronze in poorly lubricated conditions.

Vesconite keeps size – no water swell
Vesconite does not swell. Vesconite is one of the most dimensionally stable synthetic materials available. Vesconite bearings may be machined to the correct clearances without fear of swelling. Clearances do not disappear. Vesconite gives you security!

For most synthetic bearing materials, water swell is a major problem. With water swell, there is always a risk of seizure. To compensate, suppliers of materials which swell advise excessive

Smooth Running
Compared to most elastomers, rubbers, nylons and laminates, Vesconite has a low friction. Many products are claimed to have a low friction, but often only in the laboratory when tested under lightly loaded conditions, and before the effects of softening caused by water. Vesconite keeps its low static and dynamic friction whether dry or wet, or lightly or heavily loaded. Why is this important? Low friction for a bearing means less bearing wear, as well as smoother operation and less wear to the whole running gear.

The low static friction of Vesconite is especially beneficial to the low amplitude oscillating movements of rudders. With Vesconite, every change of direction occurs smoothly, with a minimal power requirement and without any jerking.

Test this for yourself with Vesconite – its the best way to prove it. You will be delighted with the performance improvement compared to conventional materials.

SOS: Save Our Shafts
Vesconite saves your shafts. Because of its low friction, most users report greatly reduced wear rates on shafts and liners. In many applications, users have switched to Vesconite because of the reduced wear, increased life and savings obtained on their shafts, often a very expensive component.

and hers what one uses to, "Do-it (CLick >>Here<<)" (http://www.skidim.com/prodinfo.asp?number=SHSBPULLERG)

Prop removal Video: (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ca4OpLWSA0g)

Strut Bearing removal video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zZ2mSH_Ncc)