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View Full Version : Parking Brake and Ramp Ettiquette


SilviaMan
04-12-2012, 12:08 PM
So, I have been watching some of the bloopers at the boat ramp on you tube. It got me wondering how some of you guys handle the ramp and if you use your parking brake while loading and unloading.
(This scenario is when its me and the wife.)
So for us and the '76. We pull into the parking before the ramp, put the plug in and unhook the hooks from the bow. Load any gear we have in the car into the boat. Back into the water, set the parking brake, then while I get into the boat and get her cold blooded engine started the wife gets behind the wheel. I back off the trailer and away she goes to park. I idle out away from the ramp and sit, waiting for her to get back for pick up.

I have always used the parking brake when loading or unloading any trailer we have. Wondering if any of you do the same.
My concern with not using the parking brake is breaking the parking pawl in the transmission and the whole thing rolling into the drink. My boat being as light as it is probably wouldn't break it, but with the size of some of the wakeboard boats out there I would be very concerned with it esspecially if power loading. (we have always power loaded, hell when I did try to float the thing on it was a nightmare!)

oxberger
04-12-2012, 12:14 PM
I have an '85 and load the same as you except for one thing. I get in the boat before backing down the ramp. Whoever is drivng the truck at the time generaly has their foot on the brake and ready to go forward. My Dad, when he did the loading and unloading by himself, always set it though.

east tx skier
04-12-2012, 12:14 PM
We always use the parking brake. When I use the parking brake on my cars and trucks in our sloped driveway, I always put the car in neutral after putting the brake on, let it roll onto the brake, then put it in park (or in gear on my 6 spd). That way, it's not resting on the transmission.

Hopefully, when you're loading up and putting the plug in, you're not sitting on the ramp next to the water. We always do this in the parking lot before heading to the ramp. Same with unloading. We have a lot of people who treat the ramp itself as their prep area/temporary parking space.

GT500 MC
04-12-2012, 12:18 PM
We always use the parking brake. When I use the parking brake on my cars and trucks in our sloped driveway, I always put the car in neutral after putting the brake on, let it roll onto the brake, then put it in park (or in gear on my 6 spd). That way, it's not resting on the transmission.

Hopefully, when you're loading up and putting the plug in, you're not sitting on the ramp next to the water. We always do this in the parking lot before heading to the ramp. Same with unloading. We have a lot of people who treat the ramp itself as their prep area/temporary parking space.

Please, please say that nobody on this forum does that....That's the worst.

And yes, I always use the parking brake as well, no matter the angle of the ramp. I've got a 4k lb boat so it gives me a little peace of mind until she's floating....

oxberger
04-12-2012, 12:18 PM
"We always do this in the parking lot before heading to the ramp. Same with unloading. We have a lot of people who treat the ramp itself as their prep area/temporary parking space."
Amen brother. I can't stand that. I prep everything in the lot prior to pulling up to the ramp. That way when we're on the ramp we're in and out. I can understand if it's someone new learning to back a trailer, but it drives me nuts when you laod and prep on the ramp.

east tx skier
04-12-2012, 12:22 PM
If there's room, my wife will back the boat down and thread the needle around these types of jokers. Sometimes, it gets their attention. Sometimes, they look at us indignantly. I personally don't care.

Now if they're nursing an outboard or an older boat that's tricky to start, we will wait patiently. But if they're sitting their trying to inflate the tube and find the worst radio station in history, we have been known to make the quarters a bit cramped.

I love watching that woman back a trailer. She's an artist.

DooSPX
04-12-2012, 12:22 PM
Please, please say that nobody on this forum does that....That's the worst.

Agreed!:cool:

DooSPX
04-12-2012, 12:24 PM
If there's room, my wife will back the boat down and thread the needle around these types of jokers. Sometimes, it gets their attention. Sometimes, they look at us indignantly. I personally don't care.

Now if they're nursing an outboard or an older boat that's tricky to start, we will wait patiently. But if they're sitting their trying to inflate the tube and find the worst radio station in history, we have been known to make the quarters a bit cramped.

I love watching that woman back a trailer. She's an artist.

That would be a treat to see the looks on their ignorant faces! You need to get a video of her doing that! I would love it see it! :D8p

SilviaMan
04-12-2012, 01:03 PM
So for us and the '76. We pull into the parking before the ramp, put the plug in and unhook the hooks from the bow.
We always load and unload gear as far from the "brain dead zone" (ramp) as possible.
I'll be working with the wife this year on backing up the trailer. I will love the day that she can back the rig in!
I figure that if we are at the ramp for more than 2 minutes or so, its a really bad day!
Now with my father or the select friends that can back up a trailer its not uncommon for a minute or less. Most of the time is getting her warm enough to get in gear without stalling!
She doesn't like being cold!

SilviaMan
04-12-2012, 01:07 PM
To the other power loaders.
When dealing with having to "thread the needle" to get onto the trailer you ever... give it that little extra and send the wonderful people that won't get out of the way toward the end of the dock?
I use this move sparingly, but its great stress reliever.

oxberger
04-12-2012, 01:31 PM
Please, please say that nobody on this forum does that....That's the worst.

And yes, I always use the parking brake as well, no matter the angle of the ramp. I've got a 4k lb boat so it gives me a little peace of mind until she's floating....

I would venture a guess that the majority of those on this forum do NOT do that. There may be some new boat owners on here though that can learn to do things right from the start. From the postings I've seen regarding the ramp, most seem to take it like a pit stop challenege for NASCAR. The quickest time in/out wins.

Stx221
04-12-2012, 01:56 PM
Oxberger, being that new boat owner, I probably spend too much time in the parking lot before the launch getting things ready and after loading getting things squared away. I'd never sit on the ramp and get things together.

The launch always seems to go quickly, NASCAR pit stop style (about a minute or so).

The re-loading seems to take me a few minutes, though the more I do it the quicker it gets. The boat buddy is currently what is slowing me down as I just cant seem to get it to work and have everything line up right so I've been getting the boat close and jumping the windshield to hook up the winch and crank it up into place. I'm thinking of ditching it for a bow roller and safety chain... The time during reloading has nothing to do with cleaning things from the boat, but really just loading. Hopefully nobody would fault me for that. :)

I'd love to be able to launch in under a minute and reload in under a minute. That is my goal for the end of the summer, but would love to be able to do it ASAP, especially if I can figure out how to line everything up to use the bow buddy every time and not have to jump the windsheild. Considering its April and I am halfway there with the quick launch, I'd say its possible to achieve. It's early in the season and there are hardly any people at the launches, so I'm not holding anybody up either.

To answer the parking brake question: Yes I use it, though I need to tighten it up as it only works when slammed to the floor. New(er) to me truck, I just haven't gotten around to it yet.

mzimme
04-12-2012, 01:59 PM
For you guys with the older boats, can you give a little advise on that metal piece that hooks to the bow eye? My 83's trailer has that piece of metal that come sup and hooks over the eyelet on the bow, and that bastard was a pain to get to fall the first time I put the boat in the water. I'd like to not fight with it next time I go out, so I don't take forever. The time I did take the boat out it was later and the ramp was empty... it was my maiden voyage so I wanted to make sure it wasn't busy, but I fought with that stupid metal piece for a few minutes. It almost catches on the bow eye. I had to back the boat pretty far into the water, then power forward before that piece finally dropped off. Is there a simpler solution to this?

Hopefully some of you know what part of the trailer I'm referring to.

Actually, here's a photo. It's that piece that runs up to the bow hook:

http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u99/zimstang/IMG_3000.jpg

bcd
04-12-2012, 02:03 PM
I don't ever use my parking brake. I should, but don't. I've also got a reason to recommend you always put it in 4WD also. I normally put in using our club's private ramp, so get ready time isn't an issue. A few years ago, I was putting in using a public ramp at a different area, and there was a line, so I was going quick. I backed down and had to go pretty far since the ramp wasn't steep. My rear truck tires were in the water, and the ramp had some pretty slippery slime growing on it. I backed down, threw the truck in park and hopped out. I left the door open, and as I was walking back towards the boat, my truck door almost knocked me over. When the truck rolled backwards the slight bit to engage the park gear, it was enough to break the rear tires loose on the slime, and my truck was sliding into the drink. Luckily, I wasn't knocked over and was able to jump in and hit the brakes. The parking brake wouldn't have saved this one, but 4WD would have.

Maybe I'll finally wisen up and use my parking brake too tonight.

tph
04-12-2012, 02:14 PM
"We pull into the parking before the ramp, put the plug in and unhook the hooks from the bow. "

So, you back down the ramp with no connection between the trailer and the bow of the boat? I don't disconnect the bow until the trailer is wet.

BrooksfamX2
04-12-2012, 02:54 PM
We always use the parking brake. When I use the parking brake on my cars and trucks in our sloped driveway, I always put the car in neutral after putting the brake on, let it roll onto the brake, then put it in park (or in gear on my 6 spd). That way, it's not resting on the transmission.................

Same here, especially in the motorbome. I have seen folks have trouble getting their motorhome out of park because of the pressure on the transmission park pall. One had to have another rig hook onto it and pull it forward a tiny bit to relieve the pressure to get the MH out of park.

BrooksfamX2
04-12-2012, 02:56 PM
I don't ever use my parking brake. I should, but don't. I've also got a reason to recommend you always put it in 4WD also. I normally put in using our club's private ramp, so get ready time isn't an issue. A few years ago, I was putting in using a public ramp at a different area, and there was a line, so I was going quick. I backed down and had to go pretty far since the ramp wasn't steep. My rear truck tires were in the water, and the ramp had some pretty slippery slime growing on it. I backed down, threw the truck in park and hopped out. I left the door open, and as I was walking back towards the boat, my truck door almost knocked me over. When the truck rolled backwards the slight bit to engage the park gear, it was enough to break the rear tires loose on the slime, and my truck was sliding into the drink. Luckily, I wasn't knocked over and was able to jump in and hit the brakes. The parking brake wouldn't have saved this one, but 4WD would have.

Maybe I'll finally wisen up and use my parking brake too tonight.



Unfortunately, not everyone has 4WD.......

gatorguy
04-12-2012, 03:08 PM
I start by putting my plug in at home while I'm loading skis, boards, and jackets. Then we trailer to the lake and stop at the prep area at the top of the ramp. I put the kids in the boat and unhook transom straps, bow strap and boat buddy. I then have my son sitting in the drivers seat of the boat with the blower running. I then back down the ramp hit the brake and the boat goes sliding off the trailer into the water at which point my son starts the boat and I pull out. Takes less than 30 seconds on the ramp. In 25 yrs of boating we have never dropped a boat on the ramp, and I can count on one hand the number of times the boat didn't start, and we had to swim it back to the trailer or dock. Loading is the same thing in the opposite order. Driver sets boat buddy and backs in till the wheel wells are covered, drive the boat on the trailer bumping the gas just a bit to latch the pin. Boat driver gives truck driver the thumbs-up sign, and he/she pulls out back to the prep area. There we wipe down the boat, pull the plug, and make sure everything will travel without blowing away.

I know there are those that will say I'm asking for trouble trusting the boat buddy, and backing without having a strap or chain hooked up. Maybe one day I will be sorry, but we have a nice and smooth ramp that's not too steep, and we do everything nice and slow/smooth. And as everyone knows "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast!"

And besides that I've been doing it this way forever and it works for me and my crew.

SilviaMan
04-12-2012, 03:11 PM
"We pull into the parking before the ramp, put the plug in and unhook the hooks from the bow. "

So, you back down the ramp with no connection between the trailer and the bow of the boat? I don't disconnect the bow until the trailer is wet.

Yep, the dry bunks make it pretty much impossible to move the boat on the trailer. It would have to be one hell of a stop to get that thing to move, at 5 mph at the ramp don't think it would move at all even with a panic stop.
With the bunks wet I would probably leave the hook on, but that happens infrequently.
Also, the ramp we use isn't all that steep... I have seen some ramps on erie that I would definitely leave the hook on loose just in case.

BrooksfamX2
04-12-2012, 03:16 PM
I never unhook the bow until in the water and the engine is started. I've seen too many try to get a boat that wont start back on a trailer and out of the way after they have unhooked it.........

SilviaMan
04-12-2012, 03:24 PM
For you guys with the older boats, can you give a little advise on that metal piece that hooks to the bow eye? My 83's trailer has that piece of metal that come sup and hooks over the eyelet on the bow, and that bastard was a pain to get to fall the first time I put the boat in the water. I'd like to not fight with it next time I go out, so I don't take forever. The time I did take the boat out it was later and the ramp was empty... it was my maiden voyage so I wanted to make sure it wasn't busy, but I fought with that stupid metal piece for a few minutes. It almost catches on the bow eye. I had to back the boat pretty far into the water, then power forward before that piece finally dropped off. Is there a simpler solution to this?

Hopefully some of you know what part of the trailer I'm referring to.

If that were my boat, and the ramp isn't super steep. I would unhook it all on land and back it into the water. Your trailer looks nearly the same as mine bunkwise, in the 28 years that we have owned this boat it has never moved on a dry trailer unhooked ... (at the ramp only.)
(My trailer is setup a bit different at the bow, I have been thinking of building a bow set up like you have though.)

MattsCraft
04-12-2012, 04:13 PM
I sit in the truck sucking on a beer, yell at the old lady about how she is doing it wrong all the way down the ramp. After 6 tries, stumble out of the passenger seat; scream at her to move over “I’ll show you how it’s done”! 3 more tries, finally get the boat in the water, realize the plug is out, pull back out, and put the plug in, telling the old lady what an idiot she is… 6 trips from the truck to the boat loading stuff, about 30 minutes later finally launch the boat. Darn near take out the dock and a couple other boats in the process, hold up the dock for another 30 minutes while the old lady, dogs and six other people decide to show up.:rolleyes:


Not – All yeah question was about the emergency brake, had a flash back of some bad ramp days. If I ever call my beautiful young gal and Old Lady, you have my permission to shoot me in the head!

My son & I have this to a science, we don’t even need to speak, once loaded in the parking lot, all peeps except him in the boat, place Boat Buddy in lock out, while he is headed to the ramp, backs down in neutral, start the boat, check for good water flow, no leaks, disconnect the winch, back her off, he pulls out, never needs to get out of the truck.


Return, drop him at the ramp, as he is backing into position, I am lined up and on the trailer about 10 seconds after the fenders are under water, he has already set the boat buddy, power her up, click, set the winch and we are gone typically in less than a couple minutes.
So, no we do not need to set the emergency break, if I was alone or had to get out of the truck, certainly then it is good practice.

sleeporbutter
04-12-2012, 04:29 PM
"We pull into the parking before the ramp, put the plug in and unhook the hooks from the bow. "

So, you back down the ramp with no connection between the trailer and the bow of the boat? I don't disconnect the bow until the trailer is wet.

+1... I used to unhook my bow eye before I hit the water also, that is until I witnessed one slip right off onto the pavement. OUCH! I never would have thought on a dry bunk it could happen, but I'm here to tell you it can, so now I never unhook until we're in the water. It only takes a few extra seconds to do it this way.

ahhudgins
04-12-2012, 04:32 PM
It's a "parking brake" so I use it when I'm parked on the ramp. :D I've been unloading and loading my MCs by myself for the last 30 years. My wife has no desire to ever back the truck/boat down the ramp and I'm not going to try and change her mind. Both of my sons sleep 'til noon! My boat is totally prepped and ready in the parking area and all I have to do is unhook the bow once it's started and back it off the trailer.

I can usually tie the boat off at the marina and get my truck off the ramp in less than 2 or 3 minutes.....same thing when I pull the boat out Sunday night (love my boat buddy). I've seen 3 or 4 guys take 15 minutes on the ramp because they try and do all of their prep work after the boat goes down the ramp.:mad:

thatsmrmastercraft
04-12-2012, 04:49 PM
It's all about common sense and having a system. Should never take more than a few minutes on the ramp.

I always love the guy that never bothers to fire up the boat at home for the first time in spring, and smokes out the whole ramp.

mzimme
04-12-2012, 04:53 PM
If that were my boat, and the ramp isn't super steep. I would unhook it all on land and back it into the water. Your trailer looks nearly the same as mine bunkwise, in the 28 years that we have owned this boat it has never moved on a dry trailer unhooked ... (at the ramp only.)
(My trailer is setup a bit different at the bow, I have been thinking of building a bow set up like you have though.)

The problem is that metal piece is "stuck" on the bow hook. It takes putting it in the water and powering up a bit before it drops down to the trailer. I almost wonder if I could not even use that piece while trailering (ramp is only 2 miles from my storage spot).

pmkkdx
04-12-2012, 05:21 PM
The problem is that metal piece is "stuck" on the bow hook. It takes putting it in the water and powering up a bit before it drops down to the trailer. I almost wonder if I could not even use that piece while trailering (ramp is only 2 miles from my storage spot).

I had an '83 with that exact same set up. I would trailer with mine but at the top of the ramp where I transitioned people & gear into the boat, I would unhook the strap, lower the metal piece and rehook the strap with a foot or so of play in the winch line. I would then back down the ramp (fairly steep) until the top of the trailer fender was barely showing. The wife or son would crank the boat as it touches the water, set parking brake on tow vehicle, THEN put in park. I would step out of the truck and unhook the winch strap, the boat glides off the trailer as I get back in tow vehicle. Put in drive, release parking brake and go to park. Sitting still on the ramp is maybe 20-30 seconds top...

while loading, back trailer in to approximately same depth as the boat was heading into the ramp, set parking brake, put in park, step out as the boat glides on the trailer (I would splash water up on the front of the bunks and the catch V bunk on front to lubricate a bit), have the wife/son power the boat up to where the metal bar easily goes of the eye, hook winch strap & tighten to a snug, back in the truck, put in gear, release parking brake and pull up the ramp to a designated loading/unloading area to where people would unload out of the boat while I was wiping her down.

the bar is a safety measure similar to a safety chain in case the winch strap were to break. The winch strap hook typically have a spring latch to hold it on the boat eye even if strap were to break and the metal bar prevents it from moving back. Just be sure when you power the boat on the trailer to have the metal bar easily slide over the eye AND then snug up the winch line to help prevent the boat from sliding back on the bunks to put it in a bind. Likewise, if the boat does snug up against the metal bar, it is MUCH easier to pop it off on level ground with the boat sitting flat on the the trailer as opposed to having the rear of the boat floating applying more pressure on the nose.

gweaver
04-12-2012, 05:22 PM
I'm new to the boating world, but I do the 'unhook everything, back in until the boat floats, then stop' to let the boat slide off. I do have two lines hooked to the bow and grab rails, and my wife uses those lines to spin the boat around and get it pointed out. Since it's a 2 mile drive to the ramp, I'll hook the engine up to the hose, start it at home and get it warm, then tow it over. If I'm going farther away, I'll hook up to the rinse hose and warm the engine, then go down the ramp. That way I know it'll start before I get on the ramp. (It's a new-to-me boat, and I'm still working bugs out.)
G

kbob
04-12-2012, 05:29 PM
I leave everything hooked up until the trailer is close to the water because the boat ramps are pretty steep, put parking brake on, then unhook the boat. I've seen other people stop on the ramp and send their boat sliding off into the lake before they are ready and have to swim after it...

Brian B
04-12-2012, 07:26 PM
Why would you not use the parking brake? Easy enough.......

And you should not disconnect your boat buddy or winch until your boat is in the water.

Brian B
04-12-2012, 07:28 PM
Prep work should be done while waiting for the ramp! I prep and load everybody but my truck driver before we back down the ramp.....

jared205v
04-12-2012, 07:38 PM
I locked my keys in running truck on ramp. I had to break window to get in (the most expensive one of course). But my parking break was set. We still had a good morning skiing.

ahhudgins
04-12-2012, 10:31 PM
I locked my keys in running truck on ramp. I had to break window to get in (the most expensive one of course). But my parking break was set. We still had a good morning skiing.

Cheaper than a new window.......:D

cdstukey
04-12-2012, 10:47 PM
I locked my keys in running truck on ramp. I had to break window to get in (the most expensive one of course). But my parking break was set. We still had a good morning skiing.

My windows are always down when on the ramp, prevents me from locking the keys in, allows me to hear the people in the boat if something is wrong and will be easier to swim through and get my wallet and phone if the truck slides into the drink.:D

to the OPs original question, if I get out of the truck the parking brake is always set.

east tx skier
04-12-2012, 11:17 PM
I locked my keys in running truck on ramp. I had to break window to get in (the most expensive one of course). But my parking break was set. We still had a good morning skiing.

We always lock the keys in the truck. Of course, it's a Ford. So we have a code. I always used to go skiing and then find the Jeep keys in my pocket. Fortunately, that Jeep would start without a key most of the time.

AZX9
04-12-2012, 11:47 PM
Have always had a wife that could back in the boat at the ramp. No need to stop, get out, fart around with straps, etc. boat is ready to launch before backing in. Once in the water boat is started and backed off. Driver never leaves vehicle. There are exceptions but pretty much if your leaving the the vehicle, most likely you are "THAT GUY"

Brian B
04-13-2012, 01:12 AM
Have always had a wife that could back in the boat at the ramp. No need to stop, get out, fart around with straps, etc. boat is ready to launch before backing in. Once in the water boat is started and backed off. Driver never leaves vehicle. There are exceptions but pretty much if your leaving the the vehicle, most likely you are "THAT GUY"

True story.

j.robinson389
04-13-2012, 07:03 AM
Then we trailer to the lake and stop at the prep area at the top of the ramp. I put the kids in the boat and unhook transom straps, bow strap and boat buddy. I then have my son sitting in the drivers seat of the boat with the blower running. I then back down the ramp hit the brake and the boat goes sliding off the trailer into the water at which point my son starts the boat and I pull out. Takes less than 30 seconds on the ramp. In 25 yrs of boating we have never dropped a boat on the ramp, and I can count on one hand the number of times the boat didn't start, and we had to swim it back to the trailer or dock. Loading is the same thing in the opposite order. Driver sets boat buddy and backs in till the wheel wells are covered, drive the boat on the trailer bumping the gas just a bit to latch the pin. Boat driver gives truck driver the thumbs-up sign, and he/she pulls out back to the prep area. There we wipe down the boat, pull the plug, and make sure everything will travel without blowing away.


This is pretty much they way my family has done it since before I was born, while I'm not saying there are no risks involved, I think dry bunks have a higher friction coefficient than most people think. In our 30+ years we've never dropped a boat either.


Also, until I was old enough to drive the boat my Mom always did the boat unloading and loading. My dad said it was easier to teach her how to operate the boat than to back the trailer. Here's our procedure.

Unloading.
1. Stop in prep area, make sure plug is in, flip on blower, unhook bow strap, and load everybody in. (although usually we're at a campground and everyone except truck driver is already in the boat.

2. Back down the ramp and launch the boat, idle away from the ramp and wait for the truck driver to walk back down.



Loading.
1. drop the truck driver off, wait for the trailer to come down the ramp, load the boat and then move to the bow and winch down the boat, before pulling away. This way the truck driver never gets his feet wet.

j.robinson389
04-13-2012, 07:15 AM
My last post was a little lengthy, but this subject has always been a soapbox for me. I could rant all day about this!!

Calling a boat ramp the "brain dead zone" is right on. It's almost like many people make sure to leave all common sense at home.

I've spent many hours on Dale Hollow in TN and there have been some quite intense storms that have occurred over years and they always seem to pop up out of nowhere and then you find yourself racing back across the lake to get loaded up to tie the campsite down before the storm hits. Then only to find some housewife, or househusband for that matter, that seemed to have never backed a trailer or loaded a boat in their entire life. More than once I have offered/asked them to let me in the driver's seat and back the trailer down into the water, might be a little rude but when your family is on the water and a SEVERE thunderstorm is heading your way in a big hurry, that is no time to be patient for inexperienced ones to learn how to back a trailer.


**Tip

if your just learning to back a trailer, keep your hand on the bottom of the steering wheel, then whichever way your hand goes, so does the trailer. Great way to get the hang of things!

j.robinson389
04-13-2012, 07:21 AM
Oh yeah, I forgot this thread was about parking brakes. Yes I do always use the parking brake if I have to get out of the vehicle (usually I don't)

Also there is the instance where if you tow with a 99-04 Chevy/GMC 1500 Avalanche/Suburban/Tahoe/Yukon/Sierra/Silverado. . .Any full-size half-ton from that era. You may set the parking brake, but it ain't gonna do squat! GM's first attempt at 4-wheel disc brakes on half-tons was a complete disaster! (first hand experience)

SilviaMan
04-13-2012, 09:12 AM
GM's first attempt at 4-wheel disc brakes on half-tons was a complete disaster! (first hand experience)

Those vehicles can be interesting to keep the parking brake in working order. Not the best design for sure!

Lucky26
04-14-2012, 11:01 AM
Hell, I sometimes drink a cold one and watch the show. Watching from a great distance that is.

HRC
04-14-2012, 05:50 PM
I actually had a guy in a bass boat drive between me and my trailer once. I was coming in and my friend was sitting in my truck with the trailer in the water, I was probably 50 yards from it. Guy goes right across in front and looks at me like I'm stupid. He didn't even notice he was heading for a "no boat" zone.