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Hogwild
04-02-2012, 05:54 PM
Are there any concerns that you guys see with towing a 23ft boat behind my 2004 4runner with a V-8? I think the max towing capacity is about 6500 pounds,but I'm not sure of the overall weight of the boat including trailor and can't access it at work.

Any things I should be cautious about as at least the first haul will be a signifcant distance? I haven't ever owned a boat so I just want to make sure I don't screw anything up. :-)

Fast50dad
04-02-2012, 05:58 PM
Does it have a transmission cooler? I'd take a spare trailer tire and tools to change the lug nuts.

CantRepeat
04-02-2012, 06:03 PM
What model boat is it?

pmkkdx
04-02-2012, 06:06 PM
one of my concerns would be if the trailer has functional brakes!!! My wife's '11 4runner 2wd is only rated at 4500lbs towing (which my '04 X2 is pushing the limit IMO, haven't tried towing with it yet). If yours has the towing package, hopefully it has the transmission cooler???

Hogwild
04-02-2012, 06:17 PM
My 4runner did come with the towing package and I was told by the dealership that it does have a transmission cooler. The boat is a 1999 Maristar 230. Seller told me (and I will confirm) that brakes are functioning properly and that the tires have most their tread left.

Jeff d
04-02-2012, 06:34 PM
The boat should be about 6,000-6,500. IIRC my '00 230 is 4,500 lbs and the trailer is like 1,500 lbs. So, right at your rated capacity. You could check the weight at a truck stop. It's likely that it will do ok and be relatively safe but not exactly ideal for frequent towing over the highway.

mtajpa
04-02-2012, 06:40 PM
From the brochure for the 99 Maristar the design weight is 3350 for the boat and the tandem trailer is stated at 1180 lbs.

Jeff d
04-02-2012, 06:48 PM
Apparently I remembered incorrectly. "Design Weight" for the '00 230 VRS (I assume this is the same as dry weight) is 3,300 lbs and the tandem trailer is 1,180. So, your dry weight would be 4,500 lbs for boat + trailer. It has a 61 gallon fuel tank which if full could add another 366 lbs. Usually for dry weight they don't include battery weight either. If you just have the stock single battery you'd have another 65 lbs or so. So, your actual weight should be around 4,800 lbs + any other gear you're hauling.

Jerseydave
04-02-2012, 06:49 PM
2004 V8 4runner towing capacity is 7000 lbs. 4WD, 7300 2WD so I think you're ok.

If you're not use to towing anything, go easy and don't speed. You Toyota is not a long wheelbase so it can tend to wander at high speeds or when going downhill. Make sure your tire pressures are correct, soft tires can make your vehicle more difficult to control.

Despite the towing specs on that SUV, frequent towing your size boat will shorten the life of your brakes, suspension and transmission.

LittleFuss
04-02-2012, 06:58 PM
Does it have a transmission cooler? I'd take a spare trailer tire and tools to change the lug nuts.

Hell to the yeah

pmkkdx
04-02-2012, 07:12 PM
a valuable lesson I learned from experience ... if you are towing for a lengthy distance, check tires after the first 25-50 miles for unusual wear patterns, especially inside/outside of thread even if they look good to start.

I found my trailer had a bent axle (hit something substantial in transit is my guess) but had a brand new tire on the ground when I picked it up ... to which was worn down to the steel cord within ~100 miles of me taking delivery.

also check to insure you have the proper wiring or adapter for your particular vehicle to connect to the boat trailer. I found Dodge products do not have the proper wiring into the factory 7 pole plug to support off the shelf auto parts stores 7 pole to flat 5 adapter to the flat 5 connector most boat trailers with surge brakes have allowing backing the trailer (uses the backup light wiring to put power to the brake solenoid on the trailer to prevent brakes locking up while backing) ... but my wife's 4runner does have the backup lights wired to the factory 7 pole. My '04 X2 trailer was first trailer I have owned with the flat 5 plug, so I added hard wired plug on my Dodge 2500 to tap into the backup light circuit.

Hogwild
04-02-2012, 10:04 PM
Everything duly noted!! You guys are awesome. I love all the feedback. Can't wait to call myself a Mastercraft owner like the rest of ya!. Keep on posting if you can think of other things I should consider.

Hogwild
04-02-2012, 10:08 PM
FYI. My owners manual says for a weight carrying hitch, the capacity is 5000 lbs and with a weight distributing hitch it is 7000 lbs. I wonder what I have? I know the truck came with a hitch, but I didn't know there were two types.

ted shred
04-02-2012, 10:17 PM
FYI. My owners manual says for a weight carrying hitch, the capacity is 5000 lbs and with a weight distributing hitch it is 7000 lbs. I wonder what I have? I know the truck came with a hitch, but I didn't know there were two types.

You have a weight carrying hitch. A weight distributing hitch has two arms that attach to the trailer tongue. They are adjustable to push the weight forward on the frame of the truck. They work great. Also some weight carrying hitches will have a maximum trailer tongue weight.

Hogwild
04-02-2012, 10:30 PM
Ok, so I was looking at the hitch and it looks like a weight distributing hitch diagrammed in the manual but it doesn't have arms that detach as you say. Another concern I have is that even if it is a weight distributing hitch and even though the towing capacity of the truck is 7000 lb, the GVWR on the certification label inside the truck says 5710 lbs. I certainly don't want to overload and ruin my 4runner.

Jeff d
04-02-2012, 10:32 PM
You'd know it if you had a weight distributing hitch. Do a google image search to see what they look like.

Hogwild
04-02-2012, 10:36 PM
You'd know it if you had a weight distributing hitch. Do a google image search to see what they look like.

Uh..yeah. I don't have anything like that. :D

Jeff d
04-02-2012, 10:37 PM
The GVWR doesn't include the entire trailer weight. Not sure how it's calculated but it's normal for the maximum trailer weight to be more than the GVWR.

Jeff d
04-02-2012, 10:45 PM
Also, when you hook up to the boat if your rear suspension sags really low you may need to reevaluate your hitch drop/rise to level the trailer. I'm betting you will need one with rise rather than drop to get it level on the 4 runner. Maybe +2" or so.

If its going to be your long term tow rig then you'd probably benefit from adding some airbag helper springs that you can inflate when towing. You can do this with a cheap portable air pump like for tires or you can get fancy and plumb them to an onboard electric compressor.

I'm betting you will get a pretty good amount of sag under that tongue weight. My 1/2 ton Dodge sags right up to the point where if it sagged slightly more I'd get some air bags.

hood158
04-02-2012, 11:42 PM
I have a 03 4runner V8 2WD with the tow package and I tow my 2009 X30 with it, but I have the weight distribution hitch and I have the equalizer sway control setup for the trailer. www.equalizerhitch.com The weight distribution setup really does work. I won't tow my boat without it. If I just hook the hitch up as weight carrying, the back end really sags. Once you hook the equalizer torsion bars, it's a big difference. It's a PITA to get setup correctly, but once it's setup it only adds another minute to hooking up the trailer.

Hogwild
04-02-2012, 11:53 PM
I have a 03 4runner V8 2WD with the tow package and I tow my 2009 X30 with it, but I have the weight distribution hitch and I have the equalizer sway control setup for the trailer. www.equalizerhitch.com The weight distribution setup really does work. I won't tow my boat without it. If I just hook the hitch up as weight carrying, the back end really sags. Once you hook the equalizer torsion bars, it's a big difference. It's a PITA to get setup correctly, but once it's setup it only adds another minute to hooking up the trailer.

What did this setup cost you?

nmcjr
04-03-2012, 12:53 AM
Towing capacities tend to be overstated marketing numbers, so I don't ever tow right up to the limit vehicle manufacturers state. Id agree that the weight distributing hitch is probably the way to go and they make a big difference in how heavy a trailer feels behind the vehicle. Anti sway also a good idea and the setups aren't too expensive, just go to a local trailer shop and ask their advice.

Hogwild
04-03-2012, 06:21 AM
I have a 03 4runner V8 2WD with the tow package and I tow my 2009 X30 with it, but I have the weight distribution hitch and I have the equalizer sway control setup for the trailer. www.equalizerhitch.com The weight distribution setup really does work. I won't tow my boat without it. If I just hook the hitch up as weight carrying, the back end really sags. Once you hook the equalizer torsion bars, it's a big difference. It's a PITA to get setup correctly, but once it's setup it only adds another minute to hooking up the trailer.

Are the weight distribution hitch and equalizer sway control setup all one item or two separate things? And how much of a PITA was it? I need to haul the thing this weekend. Thanks

hood158
04-03-2012, 08:28 AM
Are the weight distribution hitch and equalizer sway control setup all one item or two separate things? And how much of a PITA was it? I need to haul the thing this weekend. Thanks

The weight distribution hitch and sway control are two separate items. The hitch on the 4runner needs to be a weight distribution hitch and since you have a 2004 4runner with the V8, I believe that hitch was standard. Easiest way to check is to look under at the hitch....should be mounted to both sides of the frame.

As far as setting it up, it's a pain because you have to modify the setup because of the surge brakes (manufacturer says it works with surge brakes). Since the boat trailer has a larger width for the tongue of the trailer than a normal A-frame style camper trailer, the supplied bolts aren't long enough to bridge across. I bought some threaded rod and nuts and cut to fit. It's probably going to take you a while to get this setup, so if you have a time constraint I'd suggest trying to borrow a bigger tow vehicle. I wouldn't recommend trying to install the hitch and tow in the same day as there's always something that screws you up that you weren't expecting. Your boat weighs less than mine though, so you might be ok to tow a shorter distance with just the standard hitch setup. Not really sure. Just my .02

I bought my hitch from www.rvsupplywarehouse.com Right at $500 shipped (FREE SHIPPING), but make sure you buy the 2" hitch ball from them also as it's a larger shank. Because of this, I didn't have a socket big enough to put the ball on, so I took it to a RV shop and had them put the ball on for me.....they were nice enough to do it for free. Hope this helps and sorry for such a long post. If you need help/pics of the setup, let me know and I can take some pics this weekend.

pmkkdx
04-03-2012, 08:47 AM
I agree, you probably do not want to try to get a weight distribution hitch set up on the same day as you plan on traveling a long distance. just too much that could possibly go wrong in getting everything attached & adjusted properly on the trailer side of things.

about what distance are you planning on traveling after you pick up the boat???

I hadn't thought about using one of these with a surge brake type trailer and how that would effect how that surge mechanism would work ... that could be tricky! I would like to see pictures of one set up and understand how that would function! It would seem to be too rigid for the surge tongue slide to activate the solenoid ... hmmm :confused:

I have used these for long distance hauls with my travel trailer behind my 2500 Cummins mainly for the sway bar features as the tongue weight doesn't squat my truck much. Shorter distances (<100 miles) I merely hook up directly to the appropriate drop hitch to level the trailer and go.

another thought ... if there is a sizable U-Haul store in the area of where you are picking up the boat, they should be able to get you set up properly with the distribution type set up (if they have one in stock to adapt to your boat trailer with surge brake) within a short timeframe ... but will likely be considerably more expensive than ordering & installing yourself, based on whether you are mechanically inclined and feel comfortable in doing on your own.

Jeff d
04-03-2012, 09:16 AM
The weight distribution hitch and sway control are two separate items. The hitch on the 4runner needs to be a weight distribution hitch and since you have a 2004 4runner with the V8, I believe that hitch was standard. Easiest way to check is to look under at the hitch....should be mounted to both sides of the frame.


It sounds like you're confusing the weight distribution hitch and the hitch receiver itself (The part mounted to the vehicle's frame). I can guarantee that a 4-runner does not come standard with a weight distribution hitch nor does any other vehicle on the market that I've ever seen. They may come equipped with a hitch receiver:
http://www.hitchanything.com/images/cequent-images/70779.jpg

Here's the weight distribution hitch:
http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-1.jpg

And here's the weight distribution hitch with sway control:
http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-3.jpg

hood158
04-03-2012, 09:21 AM
Yes, you are correct. Sorry, didn't mean to be misleading with the wording. The hitch mounted to the vehicle has to be a weight distribution receiver hitch which is capable of accepting a weight distribution setup which you have to buy separately.

Jeff d
04-03-2012, 09:25 AM
Also, I'm not sure of the weight but I'm betting the 2nd generation 230/X30 is a decent amount heavier than a 1st generation given all the extra fiberglass on the deeper hull. At least some of the users advocating for the weight distribution hitch seem to have the heavier 2nd generation boats listed in their profiles. The 1st generation should be under 5,000/500 lbs (Gross/Tongue) and therefore safe for the OP's 4 runner to pull without the weight distributing hitch at least for this weekend.

Long term I'd get an accurate weight on the boat from a truckstop or junkyard scale to confirm that you're under the 5,000 lb limit and then reevaluate the need for the weight distributing hitch. If it's below 5,000 lbs airbags on the rear of the vehicle could be a lot easier to deal with on a daily basis to account for the sag. They could be cheaper depending on how you set them up with a compressor.

ttu
04-03-2012, 09:28 AM
i tow my 07 x2 all the time with my 06 landcruiser with the 4.7l engine. tow capacity is 6500lbs. x2 weighs 3500lbs and trailer 1200lbs.

i did have to add air bags to the rear suspension.

Hogwild
04-03-2012, 11:52 AM
Hmm...so much to do and think about.

Unrelated question. As I'm making preparations to go up there the gentleman tells me that the depth gauge does not work and he believes the seal on prop shaft has small leak that he has left alone and not tightened as he put the boat on a lift on lift and drained at end of day. Any idea what it would cost to fix these items?

TRBenj
04-03-2012, 12:11 PM
It sounds like you're confusing the weight distribution hitch and the hitch receiver itself (The part mounted to the vehicle's frame). I can guarantee that a 4-runner does not come standard with a weight distribution hitch nor does any other vehicle on the market that I've ever seen. They may come equipped with a hitch receiver.
There never was an overwhelming consensus on the 4Runner site as to the proper interpretation of the wording in the manual. Many believe that Toyota's nomenclature on the different receivers installed on the 4Runner were a little misleading. It is worded as such in the manual:

"Max gross trailer weight braked 5000 lbs for V6 with factory hitch, 7000 lbs for V8 with weight distribution hitch."

It is important to note a few things to understand the context under which this statement was written.

- The V6 and V8 4th gen (2003-2009) 4Runners came with different receivers. The V8's attached further up the frame.

- The very early 2003 V8's got the lighter duty "V6" receiver.

Some people have interpreted the manual to mean that the V8's with the better receiver (all but the early '03's) can tow up to 7000 lbs (4wd). They call the V6 receiver rated at 5,000 lbs a "weight carrying" hitch, and the V8 hitch a "weight distributing" hitch.

Also, an aftermarket WDH cannot be used on a truck with the V6 receiver. It is not a problem on the V8 receiver equipped ones.

Regardless, it is not 100% clear as to what the tow rating is on a V8 without an aftermarket WDH. The manual makes no reference to such a combination. Certainly it wouldnt be below 5,000 lbs, as that is the rating of the V6 (which has a lesser receiver). I suspect the nomenclature in the manual is simply misleading.

So, your actual weight should be around 4,800 lbs + any other gear you're hauling.

Either way, the V8 should be able to handle a 4800 lb load without an aftermarket WDH. If you tow a LOT, then it might be worth adding anyways. At the very least, I would add some airbags to the rear suspension- the tongue weight of such a load will make it sag pretty good.

Thrall
04-03-2012, 12:14 PM
Depth guage is pretty common, replace the transducer, $100 part?
Shaft seal, same, normal repair part, unless it's a low hours boat, then I'd wonder why it was leaking, (bent, out of balance shaft or prop, alignment issues...possible). Have to pull the prop shaft, but farily straightforward and not terribly expensive as long as it's a simple leak and not a result of damage to the prop/shaft.

I wouldn't be too worried about towing with a V8 4 runner, just take 'er easy and ease nto how it stops/handles if you're not experienced towing. And either a weight dist hitch or some sort of helper springs/Timbrens/airbags on the tow vehicle.
This coming from a guy who has a 14k lb trailer hooked to the back of an F150 as I type this!

Jeff d
04-03-2012, 12:33 PM
Regardless, it is not 100% clear as to what the tow rating is on a V8 without an aftermarket WDH. The manual makes no reference to such a combination. Certainly it wouldnt be below 5,000 lbs, as that is the rating of the V6 (which has a lesser receiver). I suspect the nomenclature in the manual is simply misleading.

Every half ton pickup that I've ever looked at the specs on "recommended" a WDH at 5,000/500 too. So, it doesn't seem reasonable that a a 4 runner would be able to tow more without a WDH.

Either way as you said, it's irrelevant at 4,800 lbs.

Hogwild
04-03-2012, 12:43 PM
Depth guage is pretty common, replace the transducer, $100 part?
Shaft seal, same, normal repair part, unless it's a low hours boat, then I'd wonder why it was leaking, (bent, out of balance shaft or prop, alignment issues...possible). Have to pull the prop shaft, but farily straightforward and not terribly expensive as long as it's a simple leak and not a result of damage to the prop/shaft.

I wouldn't be too worried about towing with a V8 4 runner, just take 'er easy and ease nto how it stops/handles if you're not experienced towing. And either a weight dist hitch or some sort of helper springs/Timbrens/airbags on the tow vehicle.
This coming from a guy who has a 14k lb trailer hooked to the back of an F150 as I type this!

Once again, you guys are awesome. The boat is a 99, but it only has 300 hours so I'm going to make sure a mechanic takes a look at it before I buy.

As far as the tow vehicle goes, given all the concern and the fact that it is a 750 mile trip I think I will take it safe for now and rent a Tahoe for the initial trip home. Then, I'm going to look at making modifications to the 4runner b/c it will be the primary tow vehicle.

TRBenj
04-03-2012, 01:41 PM
As far as the tow vehicle goes, given all the concern and the fact that it is a 750 mile trip I think I will take it safe for now and rent a Tahoe for the initial trip home. Then, I'm going to look at making modifications to the 4runner b/c it will be the primary tow vehicle.
I think that would be a mistake. Take a look at the Chevy Trailering Guide. (http://www.chevrolet.com/assets/pdf/en/overview/11_Trailering_Guide.pdf) The Tahoe is likely to have a lower tow rating than your V8 4Runner (5200-5500) unless it has the 3.42 rear end. I doubt that will be the case on a rental. I also doubt that the rental company would allow you to tow- they may even go so far as to remove the hitch and wiring from the vehicle to discourage it. Ive asked several rental companies in the past whether I could tow, and the answer was a resounding NO.

Take the 4Runner, you'll be fine. If you get a chance to buy some air bags ($100) and install them before the trip, even better... but the truck will get the job done.

Jeff d
04-03-2012, 03:32 PM
I agree. The Tahoe wouldn't likely be much better if at all. I wouldn't hesitate to use the 4 runner as is. Just be sure you're up to date on maintenance particularly on the transmission and cooling system. If it's been more than about 15k since your last transmission drain/refill I'd probably go ahead and do it. Use exactly the fluid specified in the manual even if it's more expensive. If it's been more than 3 years or so on your coolant I'd drain and refill your cooling system.

When towing I'd put all of your gear in front of the 4 runner's rear axle if possible. To shift the weight a little more in your favor you could throw things like your anchor, boat battery and what not in front of the rear axle of the truck too (I.E. in the back seat or on the back seat with it folded down). All of this will reduce your trailer/tongue weight and keep your front wheels more planted. Place little, if any cargo weight on or behind the rear axle because that will just contribute to the sag. Alternatively you could put heavy items directly over the trailer axles for it to carry the load neutrally.

When you take off I'd plan on stopping 10-15 mins down the highway to check the hub temps. If the boat doesn't include a spare buy one and bring it with you. Your trailer likely has 14" wheels with a 5 on 4.5" bolt pattern.

If the trailer is still on it's original Goodyear Marathon tires I'd seriously consider arranging to have them replaced in the city where you pick the boat up prior to getting on the highway. I bought my '00 almost 2 years ago and it still had the original Goodyear Marathons which looked just fine. Within 350-400 miles I had lost two of them due to tread separation. one damaged my fender pretty good. Most people on here would recommend avoiding the Marathons when replacing the tires. I've got Prometer C load rating tires and they've been fine. I've heard good things about Kumho D load rated 14" tires for these trailers.

TRBenj
04-03-2012, 04:13 PM
I agree. The Tahoe wouldn't likely be much better if at all. I wouldn't hesitate to use the 4 runner as is. Just be sure you're up to date on maintenance particularly on the transmission and cooling system. If it's been more than about 15k since your last transmission drain/refill I'd probably go ahead and do it. Use exactly the fluid specified in the manual even if it's more expensive. If it's been more than 3 years or so on your coolant I'd drain and refill your cooling system.
The 4th gen 4Runner has a sealed transmission (not easily serviceable) and has ultra-long service intervals (first drain/fill at 100k). If youre due for service in the near future, then get it- otherwise, dont bother.

If you try servicing it yourself, make sure you understand the process... it is anything but straightforward.

Hogwild
04-03-2012, 04:23 PM
Well it's almost worth it to me to rent and haul behind something that isn't mine for that long of a distance. I view it as an advance payment for the wear and tear that won't go on my own vehicle. I have reserved a Ford F-150 instead and the rental company said that even though they don't like people to tow, he understood and didn't really mind people doing it. What do you guys think about the F-150 instead of the Tahoe? Still not a great idea and just take the 4runner?

Jeff d
04-03-2012, 05:48 PM
F150 will have a longer wheelbase. Depends on what options it has. Any v8 should be ok for a leisurely highway run and should handle it safely. I towed my 230 for like 300 miles on the highway with my dad's 4.7L Silverado and it did fine. I took it easy on the hills to avoid abusing the engine and transmission.

pmkkdx
04-03-2012, 07:06 PM
does the F150 have wiring for a trailer? round 7 pole, round 6 pole, flat 5, flat 4? Reason I ask, if it is only equiped with a flat 4 (and likely round 6), you will not be able to back the trailer up without some form of a mechanical locking system on the tongue to prevent the surge mechanism from kicking in, locking up the brakes. On mine (not a MC trailer) I can use a 4-5 inch C-clamp and clamp it down on the tongue on front portion of hitch to prevent it from sliding in.

Hogwild
04-03-2012, 08:13 PM
does the F150 have wiring for a trailer? round 7 pole, round 6 pole, flat 5, flat 4? Reason I ask, if it is only equiped with a flat 4 (and likely round 6), you will not be able to back the trailer up without some form of a mechanical locking system on the tongue to prevent the surge mechanism from kicking in, locking up the brakes. On mine (not a MC trailer) I can use a 4-5 inch C-clamp and clamp it down on the tongue on front portion of hitch to prevent it from sliding in.

I have no idea as I won't pick it up until Thurs. I guess it will be one of those things that I have to check out before I pick the boat up.

Jeff d
04-03-2012, 09:51 PM
If it just has a 4 flat harness that's actually fine. The trick for backing up is to get out and plug the harness in backwards then turn on your parking lights. This will connect your 6th pin for the brake bypass solenoid to the running light pin. The ground pin will be disconnected but it will get sufficient ground through the hitch ball. That will disable the brakes. Just don't forget to flip it back the right way before you get back on the road.


I did this for several weeks because initially my truck only had the 4 flat connection.

cdstukey
04-03-2012, 10:03 PM
does the F150 have wiring for a trailer? round 7 pole, round 6 pole, flat 5, flat 4? Reason I ask, if it is only equiped with a flat 4 (and likely round 6), you will not be able to back the trailer up without some form of a mechanical locking system on the tongue to prevent the surge mechanism from kicking in, locking up the brakes. On mine (not a MC trailer) I can use a 4-5 inch C-clamp and clamp it down on the tongue on front portion of hitch to prevent it from sliding in.

I've noticed that many of the major rental companies don't order their trucks with towing packages to reduce the chances of people towing with them. I would check before you pick it up. The rental agent may have just assumed you would be putting a ball on the knock out in the bumper. Of course if you are getting it from u-haul or the like you are probably good to go.

pmkkdx
04-04-2012, 09:08 AM
If it just has a 4 flat harness that's actually fine. The trick for backing up is to get out and plug the harness in backwards then turn on your parking lights. This will connect your 6th pin for the brake bypass solenoid to the running light pin. The ground pin will be disconnected but it will get sufficient ground through the hitch ball. That will disable the brakes. Just don't forget to flip it back the right way before you get back on the road.


I did this for several weeks because initially my truck only had the 4 flat connection.

8p wish I had thought of that when I first got my boat!!! I had a heck of a time the first time backing uphill into my garage (where I found the C-clamp trick).

there are relatively inexpensive OEM wiring harness plug-n-play kits available for the F150 if not already factory wired for trailer connections ... Walmart ~> http://www.walmart.com/ip/Hidden-Hitch-118262-OEM-Wiring-Harness/17355614

then a 7 pole to flat 5 adapter http://www.etrailer.com/Wiring/Optronics/A75TB.html that you could also use with your 4runner