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etetro
03-20-2012, 02:55 PM
Guys, I used my 2003 X10 very little last year. I understand there were some Ethanol additives put into gas last summer. My boat has been sitting for about 6 months with 91 octane gas at about 1/3 full. I did not put a stabilizer in and I never have for winter months. I have had no problems at all. Question is what effect does the Ethanol have on the boat as it sits during the winter? Do i need to drain out the gas and start fresh for this season? help a brother!

1redTA
03-20-2012, 03:00 PM
I wouldnt drain it with gas at a Premium, but would dissolve the ethanol percentage with some marine gas

Honkity Hank
03-20-2012, 03:10 PM
Ethanol will absorb water, a partially full tank will have more air in it and therefore more moisture in it, which in turn will be absorbed by the ethanol in your gas. I would not drain the fuel, but I would do a couple of things. First I would use a fuel stabilizer like marine sta-bil and fill the tank with fresh gas. If marine gas is available I would use it, but if not regular pump gas.

I make it a habit to add stabil whenever I put the boat up, it is not expensive and gives me peace of mind especially if I was forced to use an ethanol gas.

madcityskier
03-20-2012, 03:17 PM
Not ideal, but much less of an issue in your newer boat. Good advice regarding stabilizing and diluting. A lot of places around here don't run ethanol in the premium. Check the pump where you filled up, if it's like Wisconsin there will be a tag on any pumps that have ethanol in the mix.

CantRepeat
03-20-2012, 03:39 PM
Ethanol will absorb water, a partially full tank will have more air in it and therefore more moisture in it, which in turn will be absorbed by the ethanol in your gas. I would not drain the fuel, but I would do a couple of things. First I would use a fuel stabilizer like marine sta-bil and fill the tank with fresh gas. If marine gas is available I would use it, but if not regular pump gas.

I make it a habit to add stabil whenever I put the boat up, it is not expensive and gives me peace of mind especially if I was forced to use an ethanol gas.

What is the difference in marine gas and regular pump gas? Or are you talking about non ethanol fuel?

JimN
03-20-2012, 04:01 PM
Once the ethanol has absorbed the water, fuel stabilizers will do nothing to help. The ethanol/water mixture is still laying at the bottom, waiting for turbulence to stir things up and this keeps the mixture from being the first to be pumped from the tank into the engine. If you take a fuel sample and see a lot of water, either in beads or milkiness, it might be best to remove the bad gas from the tank and either filter it yourself, or give it to someone else who can. It wouldn't be hard to rig up a fuel/water separator that can be used outside of the boat but I wouldn't recommend adding one to the boat because the fuel pressure from the in-tank pump may be too much for it to handle.

SilviaMan
03-20-2012, 05:06 PM
We have only a few oil companies in the area that have "recreational" gas.
I would let your fingers do the walking and call some area gas or fuel oil places and ask if they offer any non-ethanol gas.
(I also refuse to run ethanol gas in my small lawn equipment, the ethanol seems to eat the fuel pick up tubes... just fyi)

Jeff d
03-20-2012, 05:24 PM
It's not always that up to date but you can check http://www.buyrealgas.com for a listing of user reported stations with non-ethanol gas

mikeg205
03-20-2012, 05:56 PM
run seafoam...or heat..never have problems or gas issues. have motors in Canada and can't get non-ethanol fuel...fuel sits for 9 months...could be snake oil but it has worked for me over the years... just sayin'. :D..never have any starting problems either... 1 bottle of seafoam and marine sta-bil per tank treatment - no issues... :D

learjet2230
03-20-2012, 06:24 PM
AvGas is a good option too...made to sit...water seperates pretty good...no Ethanol...dyed blue so you can see leaks, it contains lead (lubes valves in older motors), doesnt cost much more than pump gas, and best......its 100 OCTANE!!! Just dont run it if you have a converter (i dont know if newer boats do or not)

orbeamlb
03-21-2012, 10:26 PM
Seafoam works well for me too. Also adds extra cleaning properties to your fuel.

oldairboater
03-22-2012, 12:19 AM
Like stated above by Jim. Sample your gas and get a good sample from the bottom without stirring the tank. Seen lots of fuel problems here from ethanol and the humidity. Ethanol here will absorb water. It then settles into what appears to be three layers. Water at crude at bottom, then water, then gas. If you see this layering or there is a enough water in the sample for you to go wow----drain the tank. Give the gas from that tank to someone you don't like. New clean fuel. I am not a fan of additives after the fact. I have never been impressed by sea foam or anything else like that. I do like marine formula stabil before there is a problem.

gotta_ski
03-22-2012, 05:38 PM
From my reading running 100 octane gas in a motor that isn't designed for it will produce less power, not more. The higher the octane number the harder it is to ignite, and in lower compression engines run on high octane (even premium 91 octane instead of regular or mid-grade) you will see less power and more fuel consumption.
I used to work at a gas dock on Priest Lake, ID and I would have guys coming in with old bayliners and such that wanted the 91 octane because they were going skiing later and needed the extra power. I used to try and explain to them why that wouldn't work but gave up after awhile and just gave them the 91, laughing to myself. It didn't help that guys would come in with Formulas and Donzis that needed the 91, and when Mr. Bayliner saw those guys buying the 91 he wanted it too.
I know more and more of the engines used in MC's have the higher compression that warrants mid-grade or premium, but I'm reasonably sure that 100 octane is way overkill.

learjet2230
03-22-2012, 06:21 PM
From my reading running 100 octane gas in a motor that isn't designed for it will produce less power, not more. The higher the octane number the harder it is to ignite, and in lower compression engines run on high octane (even premium 91 octane instead of regular or mid-grade) you will see less power and more fuel consumption.
I used to work at a gas dock on Priest Lake, ID and I would have guys coming in with old bayliners and such that wanted the 91 octane because they were going skiing later and needed the extra power. I used to try and explain to them why that wouldn't work but gave up after awhile and just gave them the 91, laughing to myself. It didn't help that guys would come in with Formulas and Donzis that needed the 91, and when Mr. Bayliner saw those guys buying the 91 he wanted it too.
I know more and more of the engines used in MC's have the higher compression that warrants mid-grade or premium, but I'm reasonably sure that 100 octane is way overkill.

Wasnt saying 100 gave you more power....just stating that it was 100 octane. Dont know if it will produce less power, or more.... Avgas has really great benefits if sitting in a tank though. Thats all. I dont think I said burn it all the time...I tend to mix it in every once in a while just to know I have some really good gas going into my engine......Cheers!

JimN
03-22-2012, 06:30 PM
run seafoam...or heat..never have problems or gas issues. have motors in Canada and can't get non-ethanol fuel...fuel sits for 9 months...could be snake oil but it has worked for me over the years... just sayin'. :D..never have any starting problems either... 1 bottle of seafoam and marine sta-bil per tank treatment - no issues... :D

Heet is just ethanol and/or methanol and won't fix the problem if phase separation has occurred. I have read for years that people recommend "dry gas", which is a load, since it has alcohol and that causes the gas to be anything but dry.

The whole problem with the fuel pump impellers and poor performance is the etehanol in the gas. There's no way the problems weren't brought up in discussions, but since cars/trucks and most other vehicles have a sealed, pressurized fuel system, water in the gas isn't a problem.

ricford
03-22-2012, 06:45 PM
Okay, back to the original problem. The boat's been sitting for 6 months 1/3 full. For the sake of 1/3 of a tank of fuel, I would drain it to be safe. Why take a chance? Next time store the boat with a full tank, and stabil. I put stabil in every tank even if I think i'll use it all in one weekend, then I don't have to worry about it.