PDA

View Full Version : TVs........


JohnnyB
03-07-2012, 09:16 PM
Working on finishing the lower level of my house. Trying to plan ahead for wiring, finishes, etc. Am trying to decide between some type of flat screen ( plasma, lcd, etc) or an overhead mounted projector? Pros and cons of each? Which one and why?

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

east tx skier
03-07-2012, 09:21 PM
I'd go flat screen, but that's just me. You can go bigger with the projector, but it all just seems complicated to me. We did a media room a couple of years ago, went with a 55" LCD/LED and had a built in cabinet constructed around the TV. Ran wiring through the attic for ceiling surround speakers and have the fronts on the built in with the center hidden behind some Fender Amp Tweed Grill Cloth on a hinged frame. Worked well.

TN X-45
03-07-2012, 09:46 PM
Depends on the light entry.....Will it be dark?

Ben
03-07-2012, 10:01 PM
Projector is cool for movies, but you need it DARK. Our basement is a walk out with 2 sliding doors, so I determined projector was not a good idea. We have a flat screen LCD from a few years ago that is just fine. I think ideally (shh don't tell the wife) we would also have a projector with a screen that lowers down as a 2nd option for movies in the evening, but TV for most of the time. For the low usage our stuff gets, I could never justify the projector, although it would be cool.

Next decision is where to put the components, as all the wires go to/from that location.

I'd focus on wiring, as you mention, I recently did this as well. If possible, you want a few cat 5's to the area for internet streaming to BD player, receiver, etc. Speakers - center, fronts, rear / surround, and now some stuff is 7 channel, with a 2nd set of rears. I only did 5 channel, and it's fine. I also did surrounds in the ceiling, but I think wall mount are better, just couldn't make it work. You'll need a sub somewhere too (with power and connection to receiver). There are charts that tell you where the surrounds need to go length and width from viewing area reltive to dist to TV. Sorry if too much info, I see you only asked about the screen...

Rockman
03-07-2012, 10:13 PM
Plasma, cheap now but kinda old school.


This tv is awesome!

Samsung UN55C6300 55-Inch 1080p 120 Hz LED HDTV (Black)

Check Amazon!

madcityskier
03-07-2012, 10:34 PM
Overheads don't like bright rooms. Planning for this to be your primary TV, for the kids, for entertaining for big games? We went insignia (best buy store brand) LCD in the basement as it's mostly for kids. Avery nice picture, not a lot of $ for the features. Sound isn't amazing.

russlars
03-08-2012, 02:59 AM
Take a look at the Sharp Quatron LED. We just bought the 60" model from Costco and the picture quality is amazing. They added the yellow pixel to the standard red/green/blue. I'm not sure if this is what makes the difference but just take a look and compare the picture quality of this to any of the others around it. You will be impressed. On top of this it is literally about 1" thick and looks great in a dark or lighted room. It is also available in a 70" model. :twocents:

JohnnyB
03-08-2012, 07:17 AM
Projector is cool for movies, but you need it DARK. Our basement is a walk out with 2 sliding doors, so I determined projector was not a good idea. We have a flat screen LCD from a few years ago that is just fine. I think ideally (shh don't tell the wife) we would also have a projector with a screen that lowers down as a 2nd option for movies in the evening, but TV for most of the time. For the low usage our stuff gets, I could never justify the projector, although it would be cool.

Next decision is where to put the components, as all the wires go to/from that location.

I'd focus on wiring, as you mention, I recently did this as well. If possible, you want a few cat 5's to the area for internet streaming to BD player, receiver, etc. Speakers - center, fronts, rear / surround, and now some stuff is 7 channel, with a 2nd set of rears. I only did 5 channel, and it's fine. I also did surrounds in the ceiling, but I think wall mount are better, just couldn't make it work. You'll need a sub somewhere too (with power and connection to receiver). There are charts that tell you where the surrounds need to go length and width from viewing area reltive to dist to TV. Sorry if too much info, I see you only asked about the screen...

Good info. Thanks. The choice of TV is the 1st step. All the other wiring is part of the pic too. All my components will be in a closet off to the side. I hear ya on ceiling mount rear channels but that is my best option given config too.

Flat TV tech has gotten so reasonably priced that it may not pay to go projector.

I have large Windows across the area ( 3 at 4 x 5 ) that would need room darkening blinds to use a projector.

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

CantRepeat
03-08-2012, 07:47 AM
To Plasma is still the best route, especially if you are watching any type of fast action. The refresh rates on plasmas keep the action from motion blurring. Every LCD/LED I look at suffered terribly from motion blur.

Trig2275
03-08-2012, 07:54 AM
I have SpeakerCraft Aim 8 Three's in my ceiling and they perform great for an in-wall surround speaker. I also have the Samsung TV mentioned above in 55" and 60", both are amazing. The picture looks wet it's so sharp. One thing about the new line of Samsung LED TV's is their motion plus feature. Some people hate it and some love it. When it's on it's as if you are watching unedited raw film like a documentary. The people on the screen seem almost too real. You can watch the same movie with the feature turned then turned off and they're not the same movie. It's crazy.

east tx skier
03-08-2012, 12:32 PM
To Plasma is still the best route, especially if you are watching any type of fast action. The refresh rates on plasmas keep the action from motion blurring. Every LCD/LED I look at suffered terribly from motion blur.

You may be more sensitive to motion blur than I am. Even in live sports, I rarely if ever notice it on my LED at 120hz.

russlars
03-08-2012, 01:16 PM
You may be more sensitive to motion blur than I am. Even in live sports, I rarely if ever notice it on my LED at 120hz.
Agreed. I've never been able to detect any blurring on my 2 LCD sets running 120hz and definitely not on my LED that runs at 220 hz.

east tx skier
03-08-2012, 01:40 PM
From all I have read, 220 hz refresh is more marketing than a difference most people would be able to detect.

russlars
03-08-2012, 01:51 PM
From all I have read, 220 hz refresh is more marketing than a difference most people would be able to detect.
I don't disagree with you at all. Point is, motion blur may have been an issue in some of the earlier LCD's but that appears to be a non issue now. Best thing to do is to go look at multiple models receiving the same input and see what looks best to you. I have never been a fan of Sharp TV's until I saw this one. It is the first set I have taken out of the box, turned it on and never even been tempted to even goof with the factory settings. On top of that I knew that Costco would take it back within 90 days if I didn't like it for any reason.

TRBenj
03-08-2012, 01:57 PM
One thing about the new line of Samsung LED TV's is their motion plus feature. Some people hate it and some love it. When it's on it's as if you are watching unedited raw film like a documentary.
My in laws have a Samsung with this feature. What a horrific idea. Youre right- it takes professionally produced movies and TV shows and makes it look like the Blair Witch Project. It took me 2 minutes of watching it ask "What the eff is wrong with this TV?!?!" So I guess you could put me in the "hate" camp.:D

Im hardly a A/V buff, but I researched the heck out of TV's a little over a year ago... ended up with a mid-range 42" Panasonic plasma. Love it. Better blacks and softer colors than the LED's we were cross shopping. Dad's new Sony LED is pretty nice though.

Regardless, it amazes me how nice of a TV you can buy for <$1000!

CantRepeat
03-08-2012, 02:11 PM
I see it most in live outdoor sports like football. The grass tends to bleed over and when there is fast camera work, IE a long throw down field as the cameras pan down it looks really bad. I also see it in auto racing a lot.

east tx skier
03-08-2012, 09:40 PM
I see it most in live outdoor sports like football. The grass tends to bleed over and when there is fast camera work, IE a long throw down field as the cameras pan down it looks really bad. I also see it in auto racing a lot.

I notice it occasionally in live football, but not enough to worry about. Plus, a couple of beers, and motion blur is the least of my worries. ;)

east tx skier
03-08-2012, 09:40 PM
My in laws have a Samsung with this feature. What a horrific idea. Youre right- it takes professionally produced movies and TV shows and makes it look like the Blair Witch Project. It took me 2 minutes of watching it ask "What the eff is wrong with this TV?!?!" So I guess you could put me in the "hate" camp.:D

Im hardly a A/V buff, but I researched the heck out of TV's a little over a year ago... ended up with a mid-range 42" Panasonic plasma. Love it. Better blacks and softer colors than the LED's we were cross shopping. Dad's new Sony LED is pretty nice though.

Regardless, it amazes me how nice of a TV you can buy for <$1000!

My Samsung has this feature. I have had it turned off since day 1.

east tx skier
03-08-2012, 09:44 PM
I don't disagree with you at all. Point is, motion blur may have been an issue in some of the earlier LCD's but that appears to be a non issue now. Best thing to do is to go look at multiple models receiving the same input and see what looks best to you. I have never been a fan of Sharp TV's until I saw this one. It is the first set I have taken out of the box, turned it on and never even been tempted to even goof with the factory settings. On top of that I knew that Costco would take it back within 90 days if I didn't like it for any reason.

At the very least, turn the brightness down. They all come set up in showroom mode with the brightness cranked to the max. It will help with the life of the backlight if you turn this down a bit.

CantRepeat
03-08-2012, 10:11 PM
I notice it occasionally in live football, but not enough to worry about. Plus, a couple of beers, and motion blur is the least of my worries. ;)

Note: drink more beer!:D:D:D

stuartmcnair
03-09-2012, 02:30 PM
you have a lot of misinformation about projectors. Today's projectors have bright enough bulbs that on the right surface are comparable to a flat screen TV. That will be your best solution for cost and viewing pleasure if you have a large space. Optimal is setting it to project at about 120 inches. A 5.1 surround setup is all that you need. 7.1 is not really worth the effort or expense for what you get. If possible, go with RF based remotes instead of having to deal with running wire to transmit IR. When you buy a receiver to run everything run all the HDMI through that and use HDMI and optical cables to connect everything. Gives you the purest sound and best video.

When wiring, run smurf tube from your receiver location to both the projector location and behind the wall to where you would place a flat screen just to cover all bases and allow for upgrades when technology changes

east tx skier
03-09-2012, 03:47 PM
My experience with 7.1 is that it may not be necessary in a smaller space, but it sure does sound good, even though, most of the time, it's spoofing the rear surrounds. I have a couple of 7.1 and 6.1 titles that sound absolutely fantastic and emersive.

sp00ky
03-09-2012, 04:01 PM
you have a lot of misinformation about projectors. Today's projectors have bright enough bulbs that on the right surface are comparable to a flat screen TV. That will be your best solution for cost and viewing pleasure if you have a large space. Optimal is setting it to project at about 120 inches. A 5.1 surround setup is all that you need. 7.1 is not really worth the effort or expense for what you get. If possible, go with RF based remotes instead of having to deal with running wire to transmit IR. When you buy a receiver to run everything run all the HDMI through that and use HDMI and optical cables to connect everything. Gives you the purest sound and best video.

When wiring, run smurf tube from your receiver location to both the projector location and behind the wall to where you would place a flat screen just to cover all bases and allow for upgrades when technology changes

I completely agree projectors can give you the best home theatre experience

sp00ky
03-09-2012, 04:04 PM
Good info. Thanks. The choice of TV is the 1st step. All the other wiring is part of the pic too. All my components will be in a closet off to the side. I hear ya on ceiling mount rear channels but that is my best option given config too.

Flat TV tech has gotten so reasonably priced that it may not pay to go projector.

I have large Windows across the area ( 3 at 4 x 5 ) that would need room darkening blinds to use a projector.

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

Not true check this out and no affordable TV can get 120"
http://www.crutchfield.com/p_278HC8350/Epson-PowerLite-Home-Cinema-8350.html?tp=164

JohnnyB
03-09-2012, 07:53 PM
Great feedback. Planning to run a 2" PVC conduit from my component cabinet to the ceiling and/or wall where the flat screen would go. thinking a 120" project looks appealing :D

Planning to run HDMI and component cables to the location of preference.

May go IR target over RF for the flexibility it gives me.

sp00ky
03-10-2012, 12:49 AM
Great feedback. Planning to run a 2" PVC conduit from my component cabinet to the ceiling and/or wall where the flat screen would go. thinking a 120" project looks appealing :D

Planning to run HDMI and component cables to the location of preference.

May go IR target over RF for the flexibility it gives me.

You can always mix rf and IR. also receivers now have wi-fi with cool apps for iPads and iPhones to use as a remote.