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View Full Version : Is fading normal?


Hogwild
03-07-2012, 12:16 AM
How much fading in the gel coat is normal? As you guys know, I've been looking at an older model Maristar which has significant fading or at least a significant stain all around the boat. The dealer has told me that all of it will absolutely buff out. Is this true? And should I have it wetsanded while they are at it? Lastly, what does wetsanding do that a regular wax job and buffing does not? Thanks again guys.

CantRepeat
03-07-2012, 05:53 AM
Get a photo of the bad areas and post it up.

TRBenj
03-07-2012, 09:07 AM
If left out in the sun, then yes, gelcoat will fade... so I guess you could call it "normal" for a boat that was not covered.

What causes the fading is the exterior layer of the gelcoat becomes oxidized and looks chalky. To restore the finish, you need to remove the oxidized layer and uncover the good, fresh gel underneath. What needs to be done to accomplish this depends on how deep the oxidation goes. If its thin, then it may be able to be removed with a buffing wheel. An aggressive pad and compound combination will remove a decent amount of gel. If it goes deeper than compound can remove (at least quickly), then wetsanding may be required. Again, the goal is to remove the oxidized layer of gel on top. Once youre through the oxidized layer, subsequent rounds of buffing with less aggressive compounds and polishes smooth the gel out, restoring the shine.

To prevent fading (oxidation) keep a good coat of wax on the boat, and keep it out of the sun whenever possible. A good cover goes a long way- one that goes to the waterline is the ultimate. Or keep it in the garage (or boathouse) if you have that option!

Hogwild
03-07-2012, 10:02 AM
If left out in the sun, then yes, gelcoat will fade... so I guess you could call it "normal" for a boat that was not covered.

What causes the fading is the exterior layer of the gelcoat becomes oxidized and looks chalky. To restore the finish, you need to remove the oxidized layer and uncover the good, fresh gel underneath. What needs to be done to accomplish this depends on how deep the oxidation goes. If its thin, then it may be able to be removed with a buffing wheel. An aggressive pad and compound combination will remove a decent amount of gel. If it goes deeper than compound can remove (at least quickly), then wetsanding may be required. Again, the goal is to remove the oxidized layer of gel on top. Once youre through the oxidized layer, subsequent rounds of buffing with less aggressive compounds and polishes smooth the gel out, restoring the shine.

To prevent fading (oxidation) keep a good coat of wax on the boat, and keep it out of the sun whenever possible. A good cover goes a long way- one that goes to the waterline is the ultimate. Or keep it in the garage (or boathouse) if you have that option!

I think the gentleman kept it in indoor storage overnight, but I wouldn't be suprised if he only waxed the boat once a year. Thank you for the response.

Hogwild
03-07-2012, 06:25 PM
I will post some pics of it when i get a chance. It is being dewinterized so that I can take it out for a test drive.

sand2snow22
03-08-2012, 12:42 AM
Make the dealer bring it back to showroom condition for you. Negotiate it into your deal!

trasey
03-08-2012, 09:54 PM
This is mine before and after wet sanding. We tried buffing with a heavy compound and it didn't touch the oxidation, so there was no way around it, I had to wet sand it. A lot of hard labor and time involved but well worth it. First pic looks like it still has the decals on the boat, lol.

Hogwild
03-09-2012, 09:17 PM
Huge difference Trasey. The one I'm looking at may need the same. Here are some pics:

http://i1185.photobucket.com/albums/z350/krawl24/Joes%20boat/Boat009.jpg

http://i1185.photobucket.com/albums/z350/krawl24/Joes%20boat/Boat002.jpg

trasey
03-10-2012, 12:11 AM
Yea if thats a dealer try to get them to wet sand it. Otherwise it really doesn't take a whole lot of money, just a lot of time and hard work.