PDA

View Full Version : Lab Ret. Dog, Invisible Fence, Training tips for boat dog


Turnandburn
01-31-2012, 05:14 PM
I'm going to be acquiring a Labrador retriever puppy in May and have ordered an Invisible Fence for our yard. I've heard the best advice is to not let the puppy do anything you don't want her to be doing when she is older. I know Labs are great water dogs but I'm seeking advice about:

1. Sources for tips about training a lab
2. Best practices for using the Invisible Fence
3. Tips for creating a great boat dog, especially one that can drive my boat!
4. Best food product to feed to a lab

captain planet
01-31-2012, 05:27 PM
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=the+art+of+raising+a+puppy,+monks+of+new +skete&hl=en&cid=6921210537059161572&ei=ClwoT9***ZryMLnP2MwH&ved=0CBgQ8wIwAQ#p

I read this book and did everything it told me to do and I have the best dog I have ever had. I highly recommend it to everybody and will reread it when we get our next dog. We don't have an invisible fence and don't need it because our dog listens so well.

My dog has had Eukaneuba her whole life and I get complements about her coat from lots of people.

captain planet
01-31-2012, 05:37 PM
Here is Ms. Captain Morgan...or as we call her, Morgan.

mwg
01-31-2012, 05:48 PM
One of my other hobbies is training hunting retrievers.. The key to dog training is consistency and repetition. For a young pup work on simple obedience (here, sit and get them used to being on a lead) and SOCIALIZATION.. take him with you anywhere and everywhere you can and get him used to being around strangers and unfamiliar places. I like to take my puppies to Pet Smart & Bass Pro.. they get to experience all kinds of new smells & people. Get him used to riding in the truck and boat at a young age.. if you want him to stay in a certain spot in the boat work on it now with treats (cut up hot dogs).. this is about the only thing I would use treats for.. the dog should learn that pleasing you is the real reward (I know it sounds rough but I find that is what my dog likes to do.. i'm happy they're happy)

Keep in mind his attention span is very short so keep your training sessions short but frequent.. several a day. We typically start formal obedience around 6-8 months.. up until then it is just fun and games..

I encourage everyone to teach a dog to stay in a crate; not only as a tool for potty training but place the puppy can go to feel safe and relax (especially if you have smaller children). Also, keep your puppy/dog tired; give them something to do daily.. they will be much better overall.

As far as books.. there are many out there. I personally like "10 Minute Retriever" although I really don't completely adhere to it and not all parts will be applicable to your situation.

Just for kicks I attached a pic of my last lab.. I love that dog.. he taught me allot not only about dog training but about life.. He was hit by a car when he was 2 (jumped a 4 ft fence chasing a cat) and had to have his front leg/paw pinned back together.. but come hunting season he was ready to go.. he picked up 23 geese the the day this pic was taken... He was a stud

And I feed my dogs Eukanuba

Sorry to ramble and good luck with the the puppy

east tx skier
01-31-2012, 06:40 PM
We used an invisible fence with our Golden and it was great. The people who installed ours did the initial training. They marked the fence boundaries with little white flags and coaxed her across the boundary. When she got a shock, they would shake the flags and say "No!" They repeated this at several points around the boundary. We left the flags up for about a month. That and the fact that the collar beeps when she gets close to the boundary had her trained pretty fast. She only got out once after that when some neighbor kid dragged her out of the yard to play with her. She would "race" cars that drove down the street, but would always pull up where the boundary was.

On biting, when she would nip at us as a puppy, we would snatch the lower part of her jaw and pinch it. When she was older, she never offered to bite.

My aunt was a trainer and finally broke her of the jumping up on people habit.

Great dog. She died over 10 years ago and I still miss her.

bobx1
01-31-2012, 06:59 PM
I guess it all depends on what you want to do with the dog (serious field trial, serious hunter, not so serious hunter, well behaved family dog, parts of all of the above, etc.).

I have trained two labs by myself (one black and one yellow) and paid to have a pro train the third one. I have run them in UKC hunt tests as well as hunted over them. My intial goals (when I was young) was to have a hunting dog first and a family dog second. On my third dog, it was vice versa.

In the old days, this is the book that all the old pros told me to use for training (for hunting):

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/water-dog-richard-a-wolters/1102224555

The newer, more mellow book, I purchased and enjoyed is this one:

http://www.gundogsupply.com/wr-tq.html

Labs are great dogs!

X2M
01-31-2012, 10:16 PM
I have a 10 month old yellow Lab. He joined the family at 9 weeks. Puppies are almost like having a newborn baby in the house for the first couple of weeks. They are so much fun too! Best advice I ever got before we got Tucker was to exercise the heck out of him. He gets walked twice a day no matter what. So far no 'Marley' behavior. Crate training is a must! Be consistent too. Good luck!

I have attached a picture of Tucker because he's just so darn cute. :)

I have gotten a ton of good information and advice from here... http://www.lab-retriever.net/board/

1. Sources for tips about training a lab
I went to my library and searched dog training. I found a bunch on training & dog behavior. I went home with a huge stack and just read. I didnt agree with all the info so I picked through and found what worked for us.

2. Best practices for using the Invisible Fence

3. Tips for creating a great boat dog, especially one that can drive my boat!
Start young. Not all Lab's like water.
4. Best food product to feed to a lab
There are two sections on the lab-retriever forum that discuss different foods as well as an all natural diet. Lots of good info there!

http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc162/krmsgal/DSC00498.jpg

JohnnyB
02-01-2012, 06:52 AM
10 min retriever and Gary Wolters books are both good reads.

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

TRBenj
02-01-2012, 10:20 AM
Good advice here. Our lab (Tique) is super mellow and well behaved in the boat. The pics below were taken last summer, just before turning 1. The only downside is the hair!

On the food, do some reading here: Dog Food Advisor (http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/) We found some very high quality food that was reasonably priced at Tractor Supply. I would look and see what you can get locally, and bounce the choices off this site to see how they rate.

2RLAKE
02-01-2012, 12:59 PM
our chocolate lab Cabela is the best dog i've ever had ... only thing I'd add here is the first time a puppy jumps up on you put your knee (firmly) into their belly ... Cabela only did that once and learned

here she is with her summer hairstyle ... we shave her

jk13
02-01-2012, 01:09 PM
On the electric fence--my cousin had a dog that figured out to go through the fence at full speed to reduce the length of the shock. I think now the collars have a preset time that they shock, this was a while ago. Once out the dog would not come back in because it would receive another.

Long story short, if your dog gets out and you remove it's collar to let it back into the yard--don't hold the collar in your hand while walking back over the wire. Or at least turn it off or remove the batteries.

Great breed of dog. Good luck.

flyinryn
02-01-2012, 03:28 PM
i AM PRETTY SURE YOU STOLE MY DOG...


I have a 10 month old yellow Lab. He joined the family at 9 weeks. Puppies are almost like having a newborn baby in the house for the first couple of weeks. They are so much fun too! Best advice I ever got before we got Tucker was to exercise the heck out of him. He gets walked twice a day no matter what. So far no 'Marley' behavior. Crate training is a must! Be consistent too. Good luck!

I have attached a picture of Tucker because he's just so darn cute. :)

I have gotten a ton of good information and advice from here... http://www.lab-retriever.net/board/

1. Sources for tips about training a lab
I went to my library and searched dog training. I found a bunch on training & dog behavior. I went home with a huge stack and just read. I didnt agree with all the info so I picked through and found what worked for us.

2. Best practices for using the Invisible Fence

3. Tips for creating a great boat dog, especially one that can drive my boat!
Start young. Not all Lab's like water.
4. Best food product to feed to a lab
There are two sections on the lab-retriever forum that discuss different foods as well as an all natural diet. Lots of good info there!

http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc162/krmsgal/DSC00498.jpg

2RLAKE
02-01-2012, 07:10 PM
On the electric fence--my cousin had a dog that figured out to go through the fence at full speed to reduce the length of the shock. I think now the collars have a preset time that they shock, this was a while ago. Once out the dog would not come back in because it would receive another.

Long story short, if your dog gets out and you remove it's collar to let it back into the yard--don't hold the collar in your hand while walking back over the wire. Or at least turn it off or remove the batteries.

Great breed of dog. Good luck.

my German Shorthair Pointer did that too ... full speed (25 mph) through the fence then would nonchalantly stroll up to the house as if he had never been out of the yard

swardco
02-02-2012, 07:38 PM
I am going to recommend a book that you will likely immediately reject based on the title.

http://www.amazon.com/Training-Pointing-Labrador-Retriever-Waterfowl/dp/0977884406/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1328225414&sr=1-1


Written by a woman named Julie Knutson. Again it is a book targeted at those of us training hunting retrievers. I haven't read another dog training book that did as good a job of helping you think about the dog training process in terms of what you want from your dog, what you and the dog are thinking along the way and how will you get to where you want to go.

Good luck with the new pup!

André
02-03-2012, 08:20 AM
One of my other hobbies is training hunting retrievers.. The key to dog training is consistency and repetition. For a young pup work on simple obedience (here, sit and get them used to being on a lead) and SOCIALIZATION.. take him with you anywhere and everywhere you can and get him used to being around strangers and unfamiliar places. I like to take my puppies to Pet Smart & Bass Pro.. they get to experience all kinds of new smells & people. Get him used to riding in the truck and boat at a young age.. if you want him to stay in a certain spot in the boat work on it now with treats (cut up hot dogs).. this is about the only thing I would use treats for.. the dog should learn that pleasing you is the real reward (I know it sounds rough but I find that is what my dog likes to do.. i'm happy they're happy)

Keep in mind his attention span is very short so keep your training sessions short but frequent.. several a day. We typically start formal obedience around 6-8 months.. up until then it is just fun and games..

I encourage everyone to teach a dog to stay in a crate; not only as a tool for potty training but place the puppy can go to feel safe and relax (especially if you have smaller children). Also, keep your puppy/dog tired; give them something to do daily.. they will be much better overall.

As far as books.. there are many out there. I personally like "10 Minute Retriever" although I really don't completely adhere to it and not all parts will be applicable to your situation.

Just for kicks I attached a pic of my last lab.. I love that dog.. he taught me allot not only about dog training but about life.. He was hit by a car when he was 2 (jumped a 4 ft fence chasing a cat) and had to have his front leg/paw pinned back together.. but come hunting season he was ready to go.. he picked up 23 geese the the day this pic was taken... He was a stud

And I feed my dogs Eukanuba

Sorry to ramble and good luck with the the puppy

Excellent advices right there!
Consistency and repetition being very important.Try to ignore the wrong behavior and give a LOT of nice chicken pieces for the right behavior.Start at young age,keep training sesions short and fun.
Really not a fan of the electrical fence.Labs are super intelligent and you CAN make him stay in the yard without a fence.
If you never train a dog before,i suggest obedience group lessons.Real cheap and your pup will meet other dogs and peoples and you'll get great advices right from the start.
Labs are the best...
Consistency.
Consistency.
Consistency.
Good luck!