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View Full Version : Drop ski to avoid hamstring re-injury?


Turnandburn
01-08-2012, 05:01 PM
Last August I pulled my hamstring muscle, took 3 weeks off and then started skiing again but I used a drop ski to get up. I stopped skiing in October (I live in Iowa and we are supposed to have winter but I'm wondering about that this year) and will resume skiing in April/May. I'm concerned that my hamstring is never going to be 100% cured (I'm age 53) so I'm thinking about making a better drop ski that will be easy to see and retrieve. Anyone done this? I ski on the Mississippi River so the swift current means the ski will not be in the same location as it was at the time of the drop. I ski in the early morning (even with the current is usually SAG condition) so we're usually the only boat on the water at 6 am. Concluding, what variations of the drop ski are being used or am I the only slalom skiing whimp on the water thinking about doing this? Once I'm up and skiing aggressively on my Coefficient X I don't have any hamstring pain or issues after dropping the drop ski. It's the pullout that is creating the stress and risk of re-injury. Using a drop ski avoids the risk but it's such a pain to find it and retrieve the ski.

h2oskiluvr
01-08-2012, 06:33 PM
Have you thought of using a shaped ski or any of the larger skis instead of a drop ski? I switched to the Senate C from the RS-1 and it is much easier to get up on (less stress) and there isn't much of a performance drop off. There are a lot of good ones out there.

I also have a Connelly Big Easy that I bought just for fun. That thing is a monster, so easy to get up on. It is a fun ski but performance isn't a word I associate with it at all.

Good luck to you. I hope you bounce back from your injury.

JohnE
01-08-2012, 06:55 PM
If you are dropping a ski then you are using a rear toe plate? Prior to the injury did you get up with both set in or 'dragging' a leg?

Turnandburn
01-08-2012, 08:14 PM
I currently have a rear toe plate on my Coefficient X and have always dragged my leg since I learned to ski on a 13' Boston Whaler over 40 years ago. The Whaler did not have enough power to get up with my back foot in a rear boot or inserted into the RTP. I now have a PS 197. Times have changed! I love my current ski and don't want to get a tamer ski that might be easier to get up on one ski. I pulled my hamstring when an inexperienced driver slammed the throttle and the rest of the story is obvious and history.

JohnE
01-08-2012, 08:20 PM
I currently have a rear toe plate on my Coefficient X and have always dragged my leg since I learned to ski on a 13' Boston Whaler over 40 years ago. The Whaler did not have enough power to get up with my back foot in a rear boot or inserted into the RTP. I now have a PS 197. Times have changed! I love my current ski and don't want to get a tamer ski that might be easier to get up on one ski. I pulled my hamstring when an inexperienced driver slammed the throttle and the rest of the story is obvious and history.

I dont get how exactly you hurt the hammy. Which foot forward and which hammy pulled. I also learned by dragging on an underpowered outboard. Getting up by dragging wasa always so easy compared to both feet in

mikeg205
01-08-2012, 09:14 PM
Strengthening your core will help take the stress of your hamstring. I use a rear boot on a HO Comp Free Ride to keep the ski position on deep water start. Also, I have my driver do what I call a "slow and go". A little throttle to make sure the I have the under control and stable then the good smooth pull out. Always use the same method even when I tried out an HO Coefficient...

my .02 anyway....

JohnE
01-08-2012, 09:29 PM
All the mechanics are so different between starting rear foot in vs dragging

JohnE
01-08-2012, 09:30 PM
As far as op, hamstring will heal

mikeg205
01-08-2012, 09:34 PM
All the mechanics are so different between starting rear foot in vs dragging

+1 on that..... but the body's core control body position when the force of the ski pushes up against the body and rope wants to pull you over the ski.

anyway...tough sport..easy to get injured if you're not in good shape.

JohnnyB
01-09-2012, 07:47 AM
Go to the barefoot section of lake elmo sports website and get a barefoot drop blank and binding. Paint the ski a day glow color, weight the tail of it so that it sticks out of the water vertically when you drop it

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

bturner2
01-09-2012, 08:55 AM
I'm 55 and pulled my hamstring 3 years ago on a deep water start with both feet locked into my Connelly Concept with fastback bindings. Took close to 20 minutes to get out of the bindings after the injury and was seriously considering cutting the front one off.

I spent the entire winter doing weight training on both my quads and hamstring on a bench with a leg press. Also did a ton of stretching exercises and still do. I still ski the same set up and since my injury I have skied every year but never again will I do so without stretching for at least 10 minutes before (and after) my run and now even if I'm slightly out of alignment during my start I'll drop the rope and try again. Don't know that my hamstring will ever be the same. It seems to want to knot up pretty easy but that could be just me getting old. For me, I have to work out all winter and stretch or I can just assume I'll be getting injured. It's a bite getting old especially when you ski with a group that's mostly 15 - 20 years younger than you.

As far as a drop ski goes we use to paint a gallon jug orange and tie it to the drop ski. It may sound cumbersome but you really should only need the drop ski for the first 20' or so to get over the initial pull. We were always able to find the ski with that jug tied it.

Turnandburn
01-09-2012, 09:27 AM
Thanks for the good ideas. I'm in the same figurative boat at bturner2. I was in good shape and despite having skied over 40 years I never had a muscle problem until the event I described in my post above. My injury last fall was due to a neophyte driver using a fast trottle and my split second decision to hang on which, in retrospect, was a bad idea as I was pulled over the top of the ski and wallowed in the water in pain wondering how I was ever going to get my ski off! I've been exercising it quite a bit this winter (Crossfit) but can't get rid of the knot in my hammy. It seems the psychological effect could be worse than the physical effect as my brain knows that I don't ever want to repeat this injury but I'm prone now so that is why I'm thinking about using a a beginner techinigue to launch an expert back into his favorite passtime.

mikeg205
01-09-2012, 10:03 AM
+1 on the stretching... 52 here and after reading another thread here on injuries I even have a rope and handle in the basement to exercise the step up from a deep water start.

+1 on the newbie drivers...many folks think you need a hole-shot to rip you out of the water...I've taught a number of drivers to just take a bit easy...does't take much to get you out of the water...

Hammy's a tough injury if not healed properly... Hey Turn where are you in the midwest?? I am form the Joliet - Plainfield area in Illinois.

bturner2
01-09-2012, 10:47 AM
Brighton MI. My boat's on Pontiac Lake (no relation to the City of Pontiac). Pontiac Lake is in the very north western portion of the Detroit suburbs.

BrooksfamX2
01-09-2012, 10:57 AM
................ It seems the psychological effect could be worse than the physical effect as my brain knows that I don't ever want to repeat this injury but I'm prone now so that is why I'm thinking about using a a beginner techinigue to launch an expert back into his favorite passtime.

Same here (57 yrs old). Tore mine 3 years ago on a hard pull start. Had a bruse the size of a mellon on the back of my leg for several weeks. I have not slalomed again cuz I dont want a repeat.

I tandom ski now (surf and tube also). I know, not cool, but I like to ski and I can have a lot of fun on 2 skis cuttin' and jumpin'.......not sure if I'll go back to one ski........:confused:

Turnandburn
01-09-2012, 11:36 AM
I live in Bettendorf, Iowa on the banks of the Mississippi River and during the season my PS197 is moored one mile downriver at a marina resting on a boat lift in a covered slip. Life is good.

tex
01-09-2012, 11:38 AM
Go to the barefoot section of lake elmo sports website and get a barefoot drop blank and binding. Paint the ski a day glow color, weight the tail of it so that it sticks out of the water vertically when you drop it

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

Don't waste the $$$. Look for an old big wood ski at a garage sale and then do what he said!

Ron Grover
01-10-2012, 08:56 PM
I do the drop ski too. 56 years old, 2 knee surguries and one complete shoulder replacement of my right shoulder.

It's much easier finding a ski and looking like a wimp than what those doctors and physical terrorists put you through in recovery.

Iskidaily
01-10-2012, 09:59 PM
+1 on weight the tail and paint it a bright color. I admire your passion. Have fun

JohnE
01-11-2012, 10:01 AM
Thanks for the good ideas. I'm in the same figurative boat at bturner2. I was in good shape and despite having skied over 40 years I never had a muscle problem until the event I described in my post above. My injury last fall was due to a neophyte driver using a fast trottle and my split second decision to hang on which, in retrospect, was a bad idea as I was pulled over the top of the ski and wallowed in the water in pain wondering how I was ever going to get my ski off! I've been exercising it quite a bit this winter (Crossfit) but can't get rid of the knot in my hammy. It seems the psychological effect could be worse than the physical effect as my brain knows that I don't ever want to repeat this injury but I'm prone now so that is why I'm thinking about using a a beginner techinigue to launch an expert back into his favorite passtime.

I can see now how that would pull the hammy. One the flip side if you do this with both feet in bindings it has been known to really mess up the lower back. Good luck with the recovery and keep up the work in the gym.

mikeg205
01-11-2012, 07:48 PM
once again - tough sport....have to be in good shape...strong core, flexibility, good nutrition, proper BMI, good technique to avoid injury. Added yoga to my regimen to keep flexibility up an brought my waistline to 34" and weight to 180. Unfortunately that means I now choose skiing over beer and pizza...that's ok right? 2 of my friends blew out hammy's last summer, 40+ waists and poor fitness is what the doctors said.

What really also helps is some cycling...keeps the thighs strong and the flexibility up...

my .02 again.. at age 50 is was struggling to get back in the sport...now when I am skiing I am working out to be ready to ski...

DooSPX
01-12-2012, 01:34 PM
One the flip side if you do this with both feet in bindings it has been known to really mess up the lower back.


Tell me about it. I found out the hard way. I have been at the gym every week trying to build my core.

areamike
01-13-2012, 12:19 PM
http://fauxpas.org/mystuff/boat/bu/DSC06726.JPG