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GoneBoatN
12-01-2011, 06:53 PM
My boat is a 2010 X-15 MCX. The area I live in only goes to freezing or below a handful of days out of the year and not but for a few hours. The boat is also stored in a garage that is integral to the house and has the furnace and hot water heater in there as well. I winterize by draining all water from the engine and ballast tanks. I only run some antifreeze in the ballast tanks because it is not possible to get 100% of the water out.

Since the boat is in the garage and not wrapped, it is easily accessible. Impeller is removed for the off season. I saw another post where it mentioned that you can run the engine for a short period without running water to the boat. Since the impeller has been removed it will not get fried. My question is can I skip fogging the cylinders and just occasionally run the boat for a few seconds ever couple weeks? Is one better than the other?

Opinions and comments?

CantRepeat
12-01-2011, 07:03 PM
Yes, but not through the body, through the plugs.

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=44118

mikeg205
12-01-2011, 07:04 PM
I would never run the boat with out any coolant... get a fake a lake at least or make a cooling system with a bucket or hose to run it...at least....my .02... after seeing a friends boat overheat and score a cylinder.... I couldn't run dry....

MattsCraft
12-02-2011, 07:42 AM
Age old question - With CAT's the manual says to fog each Cylinder, fogging via intake can foul the 02 sensors. I too would not run the engine dry. According to what I have been told many years back, fogging can foul the plugs, I have never had an issue. 4 seasons on my boat, 300 hours, I have fogged every year via each cylinder, replaced plugs, rotor and cap last spring at about 200 hours, old plugs were still in great shape!

For the extra lube and insurance, fogging each cylinder only takes about 15 to 20 minutes.

Remove your side panels, remove each plug, spray fogging oil for about 3 seconds or so. I do this, one at a time...Remove-Spray-Replace - Port Side, Remove Coil Wire, Crank engine a few times, Starboard side, Repeat. On the newer boats you have to remove the coil wire to crank without starting, removing the lanyard disables the starter!

CantRepeat
12-02-2011, 07:53 AM
Age old question - With CAT's the manual says to fog each Cylinder, fogging via intake can foul the 02 sensors.

How would this change? Either way oil will pass by the o2 sensors. I believe there are other reasons for not fogging the dry manifold engines.

If you subscribe to the theory that fogging can damage the o2 sensors then you should not fog at all.

edit

After downloading all manuals 2003 to 2009 and reading them, the only issue Indmar has with fogging is this:


In catalytic converter-equipped engines, Indmar does not recommend applying fogging oil while the engine is running. The fogging oil could damage the catalytic converter. The cylinders can be protected by removing the spark plugs and applying the fogging oil directly into the cylinders.

/edit

-V-
12-02-2011, 08:50 AM
that is good to know. I like the fact that I have a 2003 Predetor in my 2000 Maristar. Makes my life much easier when spraying the fogging oil directly into the TB, I can't make my engine cut out, but she blows A LOT of smoke when I do it. :)

JohnE
12-02-2011, 09:02 AM
When I bought my 08 w/ mcx from MCOC both the the head tech and Mike told me to winterize by spraying through the intake.

JohnE
12-02-2011, 09:07 AM
To reply to the OP, given the temps described and boat being in garage, I wouldn't say that fogging is necessary, but can't hurt. I would Not run boat dry.

CantRepeat
12-02-2011, 09:12 AM
When I bought my 08 w/ mcx from MCOC both the the head tech and Mike told me to winterize by spraying through the intake.

I've heard that from more then one source too, but then just as many saying not to fog a dry intake. :confused: Moreover, after reading the winterization part of Indmar's manuals they seem to think it's fine to do so.

Do you have Cats on your 08, John?

MattsCraft
12-02-2011, 09:13 AM
How would this change? Either way oil will pass by the o2 sensors. I believe there are other reasons for not fogging the dry manifold engines.

If you subscribe to the theory that fogging can damage the o2 sensors then you should not fog at all.

edit

After downloading all manuals 2003 to 2009 and reading them, the only issue Indmar has with fogging is this:


In catalytic converter-equipped engines, Indmar does not recommend applying fogging oil while the engine is running. The fogging oil could damage the catalytic converter. The cylinders can be protected by removing the spark plugs and applying the fogging oil directly into the cylinders.

/edit

I stand corrected, regardless, with CAT's...Do not fog VIA the intake:D

JohnE
12-02-2011, 09:17 AM
I've heard that from more then one source too, but then just as many saying not to fog a dry intake. :confused: Moreover, after reading the winterization part of Indmar's manuals they seem to think it's fine to do so.

Do you have Cats on your 08, John?

I have an 09 now Tim, traded the 08 at one of the earlier fanfare events. But the 08 did have cats.

CantRepeat
12-02-2011, 09:25 AM
I wonder, by fogging via the plug holes without the engine running if Indmar figures less oil will get to the cats after sitting for the off season. I can see no other reason why they would suggest it this way.

CantRepeat
12-02-2011, 09:26 AM
I stand corrected, regardless, with CAT's...Do not fog VIA the intake:D


I agree. Indmar is very clear about damage to the cats if you fog via the intake while the engine is running. That clears that up. :D

gatorguy
12-02-2011, 01:43 PM
I wonder, by fogging via the plug holes without the engine running if Indmar figures less oil will get to the cats after sitting for the off season. I can see no other reason why they would suggest it this way.

Maybe they figure you will go ahead and replace plugs with new ones since you have them out already.

mikeg205
12-02-2011, 01:57 PM
My boat is a 2010 X-15 MCX. The area I live in only goes to freezing or below a handful of days out of the year and not but for a few hours. The boat is also stored in a garage that is integral to the house and has the furnace and hot water heater in there as well. I winterize by draining all water from the engine and ballast tanks. I only run some antifreeze in the ballast tanks because it is not possible to get 100% of the water out.

Since the boat is in the garage and not wrapped, it is easily accessible. Impeller is removed for the off season. I saw another post where it mentioned that you can run the engine for a short period without running water to the boat. Since the impeller has been removed it will not get fried. My question is can I skip fogging the cylinders and just occasionally run the boat for a few seconds ever couple weeks? Is one better than the other?

Opinions and comments?

Skip the whole winterization notion and get a dryuit... That way you can ski all year and this discussion is moot. :cool:

GoneBoatN
12-02-2011, 02:41 PM
Skip the whole winterization notion and get a dryuit... That way you can ski all year and this discussion is moot. :cool:

I would if I could convince the kids and wife to go with me; need driver and flagger. I have 7MM wet suits for scuba diving and I'm quite comfortable in it in 50 degree water. I tend not to be effected by cold too much. I even suggested dry suits for all (kids and me, wife does not do water sports) and did not get any takers. Thing is we ski and snowboard whenever possible (read - when good snow conditions; I've had enough crappy conditions as a youth to last a life time) and that is not likely to change. So it would only add a couple months anyways during the transition months.

So the consensus is to not run dry, ever. That kind of was my thought as well. I seen a couple post where it suggested that running dry would do no harm if only for a short time. I thought that perhaps cycling the engine once every week or so would use the existing oil to protect the cylinders better than fogging and sitting for months. But then I can see where not having the block full of water to disburse the heat is not a good thing.

BTW, I fog through the spark plug holes, never the intake. Instructions from the Indmar manual and this forum have taught me that.

mikeg205
12-02-2011, 02:52 PM
I would if I could convince the kids and wife to go with me; need driver and flagger. I have 7MM wet suits for scuba diving and I'm quite comfortable in it in 50 degree water. I tend not to be effected by cold too much. I even suggested dry suits for all (kids and me, wife does not do water sports) and did not get any takers. Thing is we ski and snowboard whenever possible (read - when good snow conditions; I've had enough crappy conditions as a youth to last a life time) and that is not likely to change. So it would only add a couple months anyways during the transition months.

So the consensus is to not run dry, ever. That kind of was my thought as well. I seen a couple post where it suggested that running dry would do no harm if only for a short time. I thought that perhaps cycling the engine once every week or so would use the existing oil to protect the cylinders better than fogging and sitting for months. But then I can see where not having the block full of water to disburse the heat is not a good thing.

BTW, I fog through the spark plug holes, never the intake. Instructions from the Indmar manual and this forum have taught me that.

Darn... you need some serious skier friends... :D...+1 on the never ever ever run dry...

esu
12-03-2011, 09:50 AM
Hi all - I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I'm in a similar climate. It's gonna get to 29 for a few hrs on tues/wed (Austin), and then warm up. I have a new x2 (ilmore 5.7h) and cant quite put it away yet. Do y'all think draining the water out of the block and exhaust would be sufficient. Its in a slip. Thoughts? Thanks.

MattsCraft
12-03-2011, 12:41 PM
Draining should be fine, heater??? If so, suggest blowing it out, first thing to freeze!

esu
12-03-2011, 01:05 PM
No heater, just worried about cracking a block or manifold bc I want another couple of weeks! Any one think this is a bad idea?

mikeg205
12-03-2011, 01:13 PM
Drain and blow out and maybe spin some RV anti-freeze in waterpump?

davidstan
12-19-2011, 04:22 PM
i have an 08 x2 and tell me if i am asking for trouble someone. All i have done so far this winter is pour stabil down her throat and disconnect the batteries. I always winterize mostly to get oil changed and impeller but this yr i changed oil in Sept and have 4 month old impeller. Boat is in a heated space. Should i fog or drain block? If you are 100% sure no freezing temps will hit the boat should i do anything else engine wise? I am not lazy it has also to do with the tower laying on the back that makes it difficult with a 9.5 foot ceiling.

GoneBoatN
12-19-2011, 05:30 PM
i have an 08 x2 and tell me if i am asking for trouble someone. All i have done so far this winter is pour stabil down her throat and disconnect the batteries. I always winterize mostly to get oil changed and impeller but this yr i changed oil in Sept and have 4 month old impeller. Boat is in a heated space. Should i fog or drain block? If you are 100% sure no freezing temps will hit the boat should i do anything else engine wise? I am not lazy it has also to do with the tower laying on the back that makes it difficult with a 9.5 foot ceiling.

I've been told that it takes more than just a few hours below freezing for the block to freeze. That being said, if it were me, I would at a minimum drain the block because it takes only a few minutes. You also can put a light bulb on an extension cord down in the bilge area to provide a couple extra degrees of warmth.

>>> 100% sure no freezing temps
What about power outage taking out the heater or maybe a broken heater?

If sitting idle for many months I would fog cylinders for the protection. Indoor storage you are not too subjected to condensation because of not so rapidly changing temperatures and no wind. Again this is a thing I would do anyways.

If you plan to continue to use the same impeller next season, at least remove it so it does not take a permanent set. You'll need a new gasket but they are rather cheap.

I also store in a garage where ceiling is low. I remove the rear section of the tower completely from the boat and the front tower legs just get folded over. Quite a bit of work but then I have access to the boat all winter. Also, I don't permanently put indentations in the foam cushions.

Just my .02 cents.