PDA

View Full Version : Line Length for Wakeboarding


rpdthree
11-08-2011, 05:06 PM
I am curious what length line you all use for wake boarding. I recently got my first wakeboard boat (X25) and have begun throwing inverted tricks (video link below if you need to see what I am throwing).

I have an off the shelf line from our local ski shop and i wakeboard at full length from the tower. When i jump, i am EASILY clearing the wake and landing far out in the flat water. For all of you that jump, you know that this starts to take a toll on your knees and ankles. I have watched some footage of pros jumping (to teach me how to flip) and notice they go huge but are landing perfectly on the wake or just outside of it. Any idea if they use a special rope that is longer?

The whole reason for this is that I want to be able to go bigger for my flips (easier if I can rotate slower), but landing super far out of the wake isn't my favorite feeling.

Im also a beginner, so if you have any pointers on my flip I would love to hear them.

VIDEO: http://vimeo.com/26097526

Thanks

mikeg205
11-08-2011, 08:41 PM
65 feet - do you have the no - stretch cord? add more or take away more to change your landing area in the wake or adjust ballast to change wake shape... my .020002

JRW160
11-08-2011, 09:12 PM
Most people ride anywhere from 65'-85'. It usually gets tough to keep the wake clean beyond 85'.

kgrove
11-08-2011, 09:43 PM
It depends on your boat, how your boat is weighted, and your speed. The best description I've always heard is you should be crossing the wake just barely in front of where the wake is no longer clean. Drag the rope behind the boat at your desired speed and weighting. If the handle is behind the break in the wake, shorten the rope. If it is inside the clean area of the wake, it is optional... you can lengthen the rope to give yourself more time to get set before hitting the wake or you can shorten it to reduce the distance between the wakes. Alternatively you can speed up or slow down the boat to change where the wake gets clean. Just be careful going too fast. The faster the speed, the more painful and dangerous the crashes and the less margin for error you have in doing tricks.

vision
11-08-2011, 10:58 PM
kgrove's advice is perfect.

One thing to note when watching experts is that the length of their cut varies with the type of trick and line load they need to perform the trick. When looking for more height or pop, most experienced riders take a relatively short cut but try to really load the line as they leave they wake which can give you a much higher trajectory and slower lateral speed.

rpdthree
11-09-2011, 01:41 PM
Thank you for your responses. It seems that I may have been approaching this issue the wrong way.

For my flips, I pull about 1/2 to 3/4 out and I ride the UP the wake as much as possible. When I am am practicing just getting air, Im going all the way out and charging the wake. From what it sounds like, that is the entirely wrong way to get more air (my mind simply thought, more speed = more air).

I ride a stock x25 and the rope is just about before the wave breaks. I have, however, noticed that the faster I go the more "shaped" the wake is (not sure about the correct term for this). What sparked this post is that I figured if I am going faster, the wakes are closer together, and thus a longer rope is needed.

Since a new rope aint cheap (especially considering I have a perfectly good one), I think the next step is going to be practicing going UP the wake and not THROUGH it like kgrove said. Ive never really though about building tension in the rope, more just cutting hard and popping off the wake.

Thanks again for the pointers. If I get a chance to go out before it starts snowing I will definitely post a follow up video.

kgrove
11-09-2011, 03:40 PM
Strongly suggest getting a copy of "The Book" - a 5 disk set of wakeboarding instructional videos. It will walk you through proper technique starting from the most basic and building through the most complex tricks. Awesome videos (a bit boring, but super informative).

vision
11-09-2011, 04:56 PM
Strongly suggest getting a copy of "The Book" - a 5 disk set of wakeboarding instructional videos. It will walk you through proper technique starting from the most basic and building through the most complex tricks. Awesome videos (a bit boring, but super informative).

+1. Or Join LearnWake and view The Book videos, and many others, online.

ahhudgins
11-12-2011, 01:01 PM
It depends on your boat, how your boat is weighted, and your speed. The best description I've always heard is you should be crossing the wake just barely in front of where the wake is no longer clean. Drag the rope behind the boat at your desired speed and weighting. If the handle is behind the break in the wake, shorten the rope. If it is inside the clean area of the wake, it is optional... you can lengthen the rope to give yourself more time to get set before hitting the wake or you can shorten it to reduce the distance between the wakes. Alternatively you can speed up or slow down the boat to change where the wake gets clean. Just be careful going too fast. The faster the speed, the more painful and dangerous the crashes and the less margin for error you have in doing tricks.

Exactly. You will have to adjust your rope length according to the boat speed, your cut speed, and where you want to land (in the curl or in the flats). Or you could just make a huge cut starting in the flats and load the line all the way up the wake like Darin Shapiro.
This has been posted before but I think the guy is awesome.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeA-Sys08eg