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Just Havin Fun
10-02-2011, 01:29 AM
Last month I got a new slip for my boat. As I am checking it out, I met the older guy next to me working on his 26-foot Cobalt. He seems nice, talked to him very briefly twice that day.

I went to the lake to see the new cradel I had installed and I found out that the man with the Cobalt died this week.

http://www.kltv.com/story/15558991/game-wardens-find-livingston-man-dead-in-lake

The back story is that he went out alone, not unusal for this 62 yr old. His wife called the boat dock looking for him when he didn't come home. Here is what the guy I rent the slip thinks, as he was one of the people who helped find him.

First they found his boat washed up to shore with a broken bow anchor line. They used his GPS to back track and found his anchor line floating with anchor attached approximately in the middle of the lake. Speculation is that he went swimming to cool off after he anchored the boat. His keys and wallet were found on the boat. His anchor line broke and the 62 yr old man tired himself out trying to catch the boat. He was not able to make it to shore by himself. There were about 5-7mph winds. They could not find him, but he washed up on the shore about 36 hours later.

Things I noticed that contributed to this tragedy. He was alone. He went swimming without a flotation device. He was using an old ski line that was extremely frayed for an anchor line (I saw this myself on the boat today).

Lessons I got from this.
1. Use the proper equipment for the task (a proper anchor line - he had a heavy boat).
2. Inspect your equipment frequently AND replace those items that are worn or not serviceable (that rope was in really bad shape, was frayed in many places, the line failed in good weather with light winds).
3. Take someone with you when you can, the buddy system rocks!
4. When boating, tell someone else where you are going and when you expect to be back so you might have someone looking for you if something goes wrong (commonly known as a float plan). A good practice no matter how many people are going with you.

I barely met him, but I know he will be missed by many, including his wife and kids. May God bless him.

JHF

madcityskier
10-02-2011, 02:16 AM
Maybe one of the lessons would be that pfd's save lives? Never ceases to amaze me how rarely people are willing to use the greatest piece of safety equipment available on the water.

oldairboater
10-02-2011, 02:42 AM
Swimming with a pfd is not swimming---it is floating to me. The man broke a lot of common sense rules. His death is a tragedy but it appears to also be his fault.

BallBushing
10-02-2011, 10:15 AM
The manufacturer of that ski line (anchor rope) better have good lawyers. Obviously it's their fault.

ahhudgins
10-02-2011, 10:32 AM
EVERYONE who swims at our dock MUST wear a jacket. Sure, some of the older kids complain about it but it's the rules. We have a ton of old jackets in the shed just for that reason.

I posted this article when a woman drowned at our lake this summer, but I like what the officer says about wearing flotation. Most of the information is incorrect, she was found EXACTLY where she went under and the water was only about 10 feet deep. I was there that evening and they searched for 4 hours before they found her.

If you are in water over your head WEAR A JACKET!!!!!!!

http://www.wset.com/story/14831609/senior-told-she-cant-walk-at-her-graduation

thatsmrmastercraft
10-02-2011, 02:47 PM
A tragedy indeed, but too many common sense rule broken. I guess that makes this more an act of negligence than an accident. Still a shame when a life is lost unnecessarily.

JohnE
10-02-2011, 07:44 PM
He broke a few common sense guidelines. But I can't believe that he couldn't catch the boat if the anchor line broke in a light wind and he was swimming to cool off. I thinik there is more to it.

But my heart goes out to his family more than anything else.

The8Ball
10-02-2011, 10:31 PM
What if he just had a heart attack? PFD is not going to help you there... Or a float plan, or a good anchor line... or anything else, really. There's more to this story...

Just Havin Fun
10-02-2011, 10:56 PM
Bottom line is that there were several contributing factors that each in its own may have been harmless, but together created a tragedy.

We most likely do not have the whole story, but this occurrence has reminded me to be a little more careful in my every day boating. I told this story because it made me think about boating safety and what I do on a regular basis.

I may stop and take the time to change one little thing that I might have ignored normally, and maybe for me it might make just another little adventure when something goes wrong instead of creating a tragedy.

Take from it what you can and HAVE FUN with a little safety so that you are around to keep coming back!

JHF

sp00ky
10-03-2011, 12:23 AM
EVERYONE who swims at our dock MUST wear a jacket. Sure, some of the older kids complain about it but it's the rules. We have a ton of old jackets in the shed just for that reason.

I posted this article when a woman drowned at our lake this summer, but I like what the officer says about wearing flotation. Most of the information is incorrect, she was found EXACTLY where she went under and the water was only about 10 feet deep. I was there that evening and they searched for 4 hours before they found her.

If you are in water over your head WEAR A JACKET!!!!!!!

http://www.wset.com/story/14831609/senior-told-she-cant-walk-at-her-graduation

I'm a triathlete and open water swimmer I do 3-4 5k open water races each year. NOT everyone is incapable of being in water over there head.

mikeg205
10-03-2011, 12:27 AM
So much goes wrong on land and it what goes wrong on water gets amplified..... water is dangerous and I agree the buddy system is the way to go....When vacationing in Aruba I was shocked that local business would rent and allow watersports without PFD's. I have taken some horrific spills and am grateful for PFD's. My son was saved by a pfd as well....a face plant and a knock in the head from a wakeboard would have finished him....

oldairboater
10-03-2011, 02:55 AM
I was a six year swimming team member. Life guard. Full ride scholarship offer and I got into trouble chasing an inflatable ball in the lake when I was younger and in shape. The wind just kept blowing the ball just out side of my grasp and I sprinted a long way. When I finally stopped I was exhausted and winded. It is hard to float and recover in water with waves. I had to relax, recover, and return to shallow water without help while not going into a panick. Taught me a lesson that day. I don't swim in open water without a tethered float now. I never panick.He broke a few common sense guidelines. But I can't believe that he couldn't catch the boat if the anchor line broke in a light wind and he was swimming to cool off. I thinik there is more to it.

But my heart goes out to his family more than anything else.

scott023
10-03-2011, 10:25 AM
Tragic ending for the man, no doubt. He did fail to follow some basic rules for being alone in the water though.

thatsmrmastercraft
10-03-2011, 11:13 AM
People drowning chasing a boat is not uncommon. Almost all of us can't swim like we did when we were in our teens and 20's.

LYNRDSKYNRD
10-03-2011, 11:38 AM
Almost happened to my stepfather this past summer he went in to get one of his dogs that had fallen over board. Wind kept the boat out of his reach. Another boater picked him up. He said he thought he was done for and felt like an idiot for not throwing on a life jacket before jumping in.

scott023
10-03-2011, 12:29 PM
People drowning chasing a boat is not uncommon. Almost all of us can't swim like we did when we were in our teens and 20's.

Some of us younger members still can. :uglyhamme

sp00ky
10-03-2011, 12:34 PM
Some of us younger members still can. :uglyhamme

Exactly my point ..some of us 39 year olds can as well. Don't freak out and know your limits. But making blanket statements like everyone should wear a vest in over 10 ft of water is ridiculous.

scott023
10-03-2011, 12:52 PM
Exactly my point ..some of us 39 year olds can as well. Don't freak out and know your limits. But making blanket statements like everyone should wear a vest in over 10 ft of water is ridiculous.

I agree. Everyone needs to know their limits. That being said, chances are good that when I'm 60+, and on my own on the water, I think I'll be wearing a PFD.

rjracin240
10-03-2011, 12:56 PM
Just to throw something else in here to think about http://www.hypothermia.org/

Also if you do get seperated from your boat and you are able to swim forever like the last two post's keep something with you to help those searching for you find you. Signal mirrors work excellent during daylight hours and a strobe or other light work great at night if the people looking for you have Night Vision Goggles or FLIR. They can be pretty small and be kept in a pocket in a pair of swim trunks, however judging by the ladies swim suit thread they might be out of luck keeping them on their person!

CantRepeat
10-03-2011, 01:44 PM
Well, once I get the solo wake surfing down I'll start boating by myself. I'll be sure to bring a signal mirror with me when I do.

thatsmrmastercraft
10-03-2011, 01:59 PM
Well, once I get the solo wake surfing down I'll start boating by myself. I'll be sure to bring a signal mirror with me when I do.

If you had a pocket sized disco ball you would be all set.:D

scott023
10-03-2011, 02:03 PM
Well, once I get the solo wake surfing down I'll start boating by myself. I'll be sure to bring a signal mirror with me when I do.

Oh no. 8p:D:D

ahhudgins
10-03-2011, 06:56 PM
I'm sure that the drowning victim was doing something that he had done before with no problems. He may have "thought" that he knew his limitations, but things are different when circumstances are out of your control (i.e. wind blowing your boat away, slipping on the boat, cramp, etc).

Everyone on the board is welcome to come and swim/ski at our dock but you must wear a PFD. Our lake is cloudy so if you go under, you are carp food.
P.S. Bring women, gas and food! ;)

Kyle
10-03-2011, 08:13 PM
I haven't put on a coast guard vest in probably 8 years and I sure don't plan on it.

I went snorkeling in the ocean in about 30' of water. No vest just mask-snorkel and fins. I swam for about 1 hour 25 minutes. I had no problems and about 1/4 of the time I was at 15'-20' deep. I am very aware of water and have a great respect for it. Not everyone needs a vest if they jump in on the deep end.

I have also replaced every bouy in a slalom course without the help of a boat. Talk about a swim.

Maybe the saying should be "Don't be cheap and fix worn equipment and use your head". If you feel like you can't swim to shore then wear a vest.

GoneBoatN
10-04-2011, 02:13 PM
There are always grey areas. Few simple guidelines, notice I did not say rules. Know (be aware) of your limitations and stay within them. Evaluate the posibilities of risk and make a consious decision as to weather to accept them or not.

You can only minimize risk, you can never eliminate it. We all accept diffrent amounts of risk under different circumstances. I work with youth. When it involves just me, I'm fairly conservative. When I work with my children or others children I get a lot more conservative - no swimming without lookout and lifeguard.

I work from home and I have a pool in the back yard. It has a deep end. I swim many days when no one else is around. Should there be a law/rule that I wear a PFD?

Hey, I could trip on a curb. I think we should have rules about curbs and when we may step across them by ourselves.

Ok, I was only trying to exemplify my point. Go back and read my first couple lines. We all decide to take the risk even when I step off a curb.

There is never going to be one simple universal rule/standard/guideline to cover all people/conditions/circumstances.

There is no replacing good judgement and sometime it is ok for Darwin to do his work. Knowing only surface level details I would not pass judgement on this.

thatsmrmastercraft
10-04-2011, 02:21 PM
There are always grey areas. Few simple guidelines, notice I did not say rules. Know (be aware) of your limitations and stay within them. Evaluate the posibilities of risk and make a consious decision as to weather to accept them or not.

You can only minimize risk, you can never eliminate it. We all accept diffrent amounts of risk under different circumstances. I work with youth. When it involves just me, I'm fairly conservative. When I work with my children or others children I get a lot more conservative - no swimming without lookout and lifeguard.

I work from home and I have a pool in the back yard. It has a deep end. I swim many days when no one else is around. Should there be a law/rule that I wear a PFD?

Hey, I could trip on a curb. I think we should have rules about curbs and when we may step across them by ourselves.

Ok, I was only trying to exemplify my point. Go back and read my first couple lines. We all decide to take the risk even when I step off a curb.

There is never going to be one simple universal rule/standard/guideline to cover all people/conditions/circumstances.

There is no replacing good judgement and sometime it is ok for Darwin to do his work. Knowing only surface level details I would not pass judgement on this.

Well said. Brings to mind the only time I ever cramped up while in the water. I was in the middle of the deep end of a pool and I managed to get to the side without a great amount of effort.......but I wouldn't have wanted to go a much further. Levels of risk is a point well made.

scott023
10-04-2011, 02:27 PM
There are always grey areas. Few simple guidelines, notice I did not say rules. Know (be aware) of your limitations and stay within them. Evaluate the posibilities of risk and make a consious decision as to weather to accept them or not.

You can only minimize risk, you can never eliminate it. We all accept diffrent amounts of risk under different circumstances. I work with youth. When it involves just me, I'm fairly conservative. When I work with my children or others children I get a lot more conservative - no swimming without lookout and lifeguard.

I work from home and I have a pool in the back yard. It has a deep end. I swim many days when no one else is around. Should there be a law/rule that I wear a PFD?

Hey, I could trip on a curb. I think we should have rules about curbs and when we may step across them by ourselves.

Ok, I was only trying to exemplify my point. Go back and read my first couple lines. We all decide to take the risk even when I step off a curb.

There is never going to be one simple universal rule/standard/guideline to cover all people/conditions/circumstances.

There is no replacing good judgement and sometime it is ok for Darwin to do his work. Knowing only surface level details I would not pass judgement on this.

Very well said.

shepherd
10-05-2011, 11:48 AM
If you are in water over your head WEAR A JACKET!!!!!!!


NO!!!! :mad:

ahhudgins
10-05-2011, 02:43 PM
NO!!!! :mad:

To correct myself, I meant to say "Wear a jacket if you are over your head and CAN'T SWIM". I wondered what all of the fuss was about. My mistake.:o

We had the one drowning at the lake when the woman got off of her float and drowned in 10
feet of water because she could not swim. Then a few months later a woman drowned in the river when she feel off her tube and couldn't swim. The parent's of the woman who feel off of the tube were on TV stating "....there should be a law requiring ALL river tubers to wear a PFD.." I don't agree with the parents, it's a personal decision.

I just hate to see anyone drown when it could have been easily prevented.

rjracin240
10-10-2011, 01:36 PM
Cannot believe how people can have so little common sense. Going out in a 22' center console 10 foot seas, 80 year old lady, and a baby as passengers.

WHAT WERE THEY THINKING?

http://gma.yahoo.com/video/news-26797925/florida-family-adrift-at-sea-clings-to-cooler-26880120.html#crsl=%252Fvideo%252Fnews-26797925%252Fflorida-family-adrift-at-sea-clings-to-cooler-26880120.html

thatsmrmastercraft
10-10-2011, 02:11 PM
Cannot believe how people can have so little common sense. Going out in a 22' center console 10 foot seas, 80 year old lady, and a baby as passengers.

WHAT WERE THEY THINKING?

http://gma.yahoo.com/video/news-26797925/florida-family-adrift-at-sea-clings-to-cooler-26880120.html#crsl=%252Fvideo%252Fnews-26797925%252Fflorida-family-adrift-at-sea-clings-to-cooler-26880120.html

Clearly they weren't.

sp00ky
10-10-2011, 05:16 PM
There are always grey areas. Few simple guidelines, notice I did not say rules. Know (be aware) of your limitations and stay within them. Evaluate the posibilities of risk and make a consious decision as to weather to accept them or not.

You can only minimize risk, you can never eliminate it. We all accept diffrent amounts of risk under different circumstances. I work with youth. When it involves just me, I'm fairly conservative. When I work with my children or others children I get a lot more conservative - no swimming without lookout and lifeguard.

I work from home and I have a pool in the back yard. It has a deep end. I swim many days when no one else is around. Should there be a law/rule that I wear a PFD?

Hey, I could trip on a curb. I think we should have rules about curbs and when we may step across them by ourselves.

Ok, I was only trying to exemplify my point. Go back and read my first couple lines. We all decide to take the risk even when I step off a curb.

There is never going to be one simple universal rule/standard/guideline to cover all people/conditions/circumstances.

There is no replacing good judgement and sometime it is ok for Darwin to do his work. Knowing only surface level details I would not pass judgement on this.

you put this beautifully and I may quote you in my work. I am in IT and this applies perfectly

jdl xstar
10-10-2011, 05:30 PM
Here's a boater death for ya...... Its sad too because I heard he was a really good chum.



Man dies after falling off yacht and into propellers at Elliott Key
The Miami Herald

October 8, 2011


A Miami-Dade man was killed Saturday when he fell off a 65-foot luxury yacht and into the propellers, according to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials.

The 45-year-old victim, whose name was not released pending notification to his family, was aboard "The Gotcha,'' according to FWC spokesman Jorge Pino.

The boat is moored in Deering Bay; the victim was a friend of the boat's owner.

The man has been on the diving platform on the back of the boat when the accident occured. After he fell overboard, he was dragged under the yacht.

It is not known if alcohol played a role in the accident, or whether the man was tossed into the water by the choppy water.

Each year, during the three-day Columbus Day weekend, a fleet of power boats anchors off Elliott Key for boating and boozing. It's an annual hedonistic celebration that in the past has ended with a long list of arrests, injuries and on occasion, deaths.

Three people were killed in boating accidents in 2002 and two college students died in a two-boat crash that severely injured seven others in 2006.

The party is not connected to the official Columbus Day Regatta on Biscayne Bay.

Law enforcement officers, including the U.S. Coast Guard, FWC, Miami-Dade police and fire-rescue units and Biscayne Park National Park rangers will be patrolling the bay and local marinas Sunday and Monday.

"One of our main targets for the weekend will be boating under the influence. There will be a zero tolerance for any boating under the influence violations," said Wayne Rybeck from Biscayne National Park. "It is very important for our visitors to remain safe and be responsible when visiting the park."

They'll be checking boats for proper safety equipment, such as fire extinguishers and lifejackets, and to make sure operators stay sober. Anyone found boating under the influence will be jailed and their boat could be confiscated.

oldairboater
10-11-2011, 03:00 PM
All this is a form of natural selection. I have been fully convinced for many years that if humans weren't such good breeders we would be extinct. Seen a show on tv that stated during a mini ice age mankind was forced to the coast and numbers were down to approximately 600 breeding pair.

GoneBoatN
10-11-2011, 05:56 PM
However unfortunate, I feel we are at an inflection point where a mini ice age (or similar event) would not be such a bad thing.