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kstumpenhorst
08-25-2011, 10:39 PM
Anybody use this stuff. http://marinerv.meguiars.com/product/Gel-Coat-Clean/Power-Cut-Compound My boat isn't bad, but I want showroom shine. Below my water line is pretty rough and slightly yellow (previous owner of course) and I have toilet bowled it and tried putting multiple coats of wax on and it still feels kind of rough. Any suggestions.

nmcjr
08-25-2011, 11:31 PM
I'm not a big Meguiars fan as I don't feel they have products that are actually engineered for gelcoat, just relabeled car products. Check out these guys below, I've had great luck with his products. I'd probably start with the polish and follow up with the finishing material, both with a rotary polisher and then apply the sealant.

http://www.fourstarproducts.com/oemseries.html

FrankSchwab
08-26-2011, 01:02 AM
I used Meguiars #49 Oxidation Remover on my pretty rough gelcoat; it did a marvelous job of stripping deposits from below the water line, and removed heavy oxidation on the transom and minor scratching. I followed with some Meguiars #44, which left a beautiful finish, and a final finish that I don't recall.

Others have had great luck with the equivalent 3M products.

Looking at the description of the #91, I'd guess that it's a more abrasive compound than the #49; frankly, unless you do this on a regular basis, I'd go with the lighter cut and work a bit harder rather than go for the heavy cut and risk screwing up big time. Gelcoat is thick and tough compared to paint, but it can be screwed up.

Search on here for "finesse-it" or "porter-cable" or "oxidation", and you'll get plenty of threads discussing people doing exactly what you're discussing, and plenty of good and bad advice.

/frank

BGcraft
08-26-2011, 01:06 AM
+1 for 3M Finesse It...they do make heavier product if you need to get more aggressive.

Only other tip...top coat with Pledge- seriously.

Good luck.

BG

kstumpenhorst
08-26-2011, 09:17 AM
FrankSchwab was your gel coat chalky or were your colors a little faded? I have a little of both. Mostly because the previous owner stored outside covered so above my rub rail is pretty good but below could use some work.

Thrall
08-26-2011, 11:46 AM
Do the searches mentioned above, but if you have heavy oxidation (faded and chalky) then start with a med/heavy cut rubbing compound, like the Meg 91 or 3M med cut compound.
Gel is thick, just stay off the corners with the wheel so you don't risk burning thru the gell at points and outside corners. Hit it lightly and it will exert as much pressure on hte corners as normal buffing.
Follow up same procedure with a polish, like 3M Finesse It, possibly then a glaze/swirle remover if it's a dark color and depending on how well you did polishing and if you have the right pad. Then wax.
Oh and if you have any scratches you want to take out, test with the compound first to see if it cuts enough. If not, wet sand first before buffing.

FrankSchwab
08-26-2011, 12:29 PM
FrankSchwab was your gel coat chalky or were your colors a little faded? I have a little of both. Mostly because the previous owner stored outside covered so above my rub rail is pretty good but below could use some work.

I didn't come across chalking; just very faded looking color from the oxidation. The dark green upper on my boat looked almost white on the transom. The #91 cleaned it up easily and made it look dark green again. One tip: this will screw up your decals - either cover them (masking tape, etc) or remove them (destructive) and find some new ones.

kstumpenhorst
08-26-2011, 01:34 PM
Thanks. Excited and nervous at the same time. Don't want to put tons of time in and not turn out great. Appreciate it guys.

kstumpenhorst
08-28-2011, 01:12 PM
Frabkschwab - did you use 49 or 91? I just got done sampling some of my trouble spots with 49 and it cleaned the scum and minor oxidation but it didn't take away some of the white fade in my red gel coat. Maybe I can post some pictures. I guess that means I need to either use the 91 or get some 3m. What would be stronger than the 49 other than the Meg 91 with out wet sanding. Plus just to note I was doing it by hand. Does that make a huge difference?

FrankSchwab
08-28-2011, 03:59 PM
I used the #49 in a circular polisher (http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/polishers/7-inch-variable-speed-polisher-sander-92623.html). It cleaned up the oxidation quite nicely. Doing it by hand sounds like a recipe for getting discouraged.

Read some of the threads for the right procedure - I believe the best plan is a wool bonnet for the #49, and perhaps the terry bonnets for the #44 and the polish ( I don't remember precisely).

/frank

JimN
08-28-2011, 04:06 PM
Anybody use this stuff. http://marinerv.meguiars.com/product/Gel-Coat-Clean/Power-Cut-Compound My boat isn't bad, but I want showroom shine. Below my water line is pretty rough and slightly yellow (previous owner of course) and I have toilet bowled it and tried putting multiple coats of wax on and it still feels kind of rough. Any suggestions.

Technically, you won't get a "showroom shine" because the normal shine on these comes from the gel coat being sprayed into the mold before the fiberglass goes on, so it's not the same as molding the fiberglass, shooting the gel coat and sanding/polishing/buffing the crap out of it. The more you use abrasives on gel coat, the more you go down to the more porous layers and that makes it more susceptible to staining/UV damage. Go easy on it as much as possible and don't set the polisher to high speed- it's heat that removes and polishes the oxidized material, not just the grit. If the bonnet spins too fast, you'll actually see that the gel coat has ridges from the heat and if you get it too hot, you can press your fingerprint into it.

kstumpenhorst
08-28-2011, 09:22 PM
Are you saying try to get the polisher and go at it low speed then?

JimN
08-28-2011, 09:39 PM
Are you saying try to get the polisher and go at it low speed then?

Right. Use a variable speed polisher so you don't burn through the edges and so it stays cool enough that it doesn't damage the gel coat. The Makita I used worked great on 2. For finer compound/glaze, higher speed is OK as long as it doesn't go dry but I wouldn't go too coarse with the first cut.

kstumpenhorst
08-28-2011, 09:41 PM
What makita do you have JimN?

JimN
08-28-2011, 10:10 PM
What makita do you have JimN?

It wasn't mine- it was at one of the dealers I worked for. It sold for about $200 in 2000. As long as it's variable speed, it should be fine.

kstumpenhorst
08-28-2011, 10:22 PM
Sounds good. Now you got me worried I am going to mess up my gel coat or just not make it any better

Thrall
08-28-2011, 11:08 PM
Sounds good. Now you got me worried I am going to mess up my gel coat or just not make it any better

Don't worry. Gelcoat is about 10x thicker than car paint. You would have to try hard to burn through gelcoat. You can get a cheap Black and decker polisher that will do fine. Wool pads will do ok, but if you want easier, better results, go to an autobody supply place and get a velcro backer and the right pads.

I don't usually refute what JimN says, but you can get a mirror shine on your boat. As good or better than a "showroom shine."

kstumpenhorst
08-29-2011, 08:07 AM
That makes me feel good Thrall. Appreciate the advice. What would you use then? Go with the 49 or get something else?

BrianM
08-29-2011, 08:28 AM
That makes me feel good Thrall. Appreciate the advice. What would you use then? Go with the 49 or get something else?

I have posted my method multiple times in these gel coat restoration threads.

I have had excellent results with the following.

-3m Super Duty Compound on a wool pad with a circular polisher
-3m Finesse It II on an Orange foam power pad with a circular polisher
-Meguires Polish (Step 2 in their 3 step system) on a white foam pad using an orbital
-Your favorite 100% carnuba wax with a red foam pad using an orbital

If the oxidation is really bad start out wet sanding with 1000 grit paper then use the three steps above. Use HiGH quality pads. I use the Lake County pads from www.Properautocare.com (http://www.Properautocare.com) they will last many many uses with proper cleaning and storage.

Also I have a Makita BO6040 dual mode machine. Runs both random orbit and forced circular mode. The nice thing is even the circular mode has a bit of random patter which makes swirling nearly impossible even on my black vehicle.

kstumpenhorst
08-29-2011, 09:08 AM
Thanks Brian. The only reason I was going with meguiars was I found it on sale and picked it up. Could care less the brand, just want to use the right stuff

BrianM
08-29-2011, 09:18 AM
Sounds like the 91 is similar to the 3M Super Duty Compound in that it is a fairly aggressive compound that will remove 1000 grit scratches. If you have it start with it on a wool pad with a circular then use my other two steps.

JimN
08-29-2011, 09:37 AM
Sounds good. Now you got me worried I am going to mess up my gel coat or just not make it any better

Just don't try to do it too fast.

Thrall
08-29-2011, 09:58 PM
That makes me feel good Thrall. Appreciate the advice. What would you use then? Go with the 49 or get something else?

I don't know anything about Meguairs products, but what BrainM said is teh same method and esentially the same materials I've been using for years on cars and boats.

If you're worried about the results, give it a try on an inconspicuous spot first, like under the boat, even though that's a pain in the arse.
Or you could come ove to my house. I got an entire boat that needs gone over and I'm sure you'll be a pro at it after about 1 hr.............but you have to do the whole boat before you leave.........and the black truck!
Main thing is you can't go hard over the corners. That's where you risk burning thru the gel.
Also, you don't need to keep applying new compound to the pad once it's loaded up with compound. A little sprinkle of water and rough up the pad with your fingers (wool pad not foam) will get you another round of compounding over the same area.
Then add some more compound for the next area. about 2'x2' max at a time.
If you have to wetsand, resist the urge to sand in a circular pattern....contributes even more to swirl marks. Sand one direction and then cross sand. Won't take much to sand off oxidation. Scratches are another story.

kstumpenhorst
08-29-2011, 10:47 PM
Awesome. I have started with the 49 and so far I am happy. The bottom of the boat is smooth again. All the oxidation and dead gel coat are a thing of the past. Still lots of work to do and I only get a little time a day. (once the wife and kids go to bed lol). When I say the bottom of the boat I mean I have about 1/4 done. I will try to post some pictures of the progress I know we all like to see pictures.

madcityskier
09-01-2011, 11:43 PM
One more vote for the oxidation remover here. Just buffed mine with some and applied a nice coat of wax and my 85 SS is shining like new.

psychobilly
09-02-2011, 06:00 AM
How bout some pics!!! :D

macattack
11-29-2011, 10:47 AM
Use HiGH quality pads. I use the Lake County pads from www.Properautocare.com they will last many many uses with proper cleaning and storage.

.


How do you clean your foam pads? tks, mac

macattack
11-29-2011, 02:11 PM
Never mind, found the link... http://www.lakecountrymfg.com/products/foam-pad-care/

Rotary Buffing and Polishing:

If the pad is new or dry, dampen the pad surface by misting it with water. This will aid in compound/polish dispersion. Continue periodic misting throughout the task. Remember that different foams will load up with compound/polish at different rates.

Wash as necessary to prevent the compound or polish from drying out or becoming caked on the pad. Wash in our buffer powered System 2000™ pad washer or machine wash in warm water with mild detergent. Always clean the pad prior to storing for future use. It only takes 30 seconds in our pad washer!

Do not place in dryer, as this will shorten the life of the pad. Air-drying is best.

If the pad becomes dry or caked with compound/polish, spur the pad with a proper tool.
Certain brushes with plastic bristles may melt leaving traces of bristle on the pad, which may result in scratching. We recommend our Duospur™ tool, which features nylon spur wheels that safely clean the foam without leaving any foreign particles on the pad surface.

Occasionally foam pads will become torn or out of balance. This not only shortens the useful life of the pad, but also produces uneven surface patterns requiring additional work. Foam pads can be easily rebalanced with our Duospur™ tool. The sides of the tool have an abrasive callus plate designed for simple grinding. Let the pad surface dry, then reshape/repair the surface with the Duospur™ while spinning the pad on the buffer.

GoneBoatN
11-29-2011, 02:23 PM
I used the #49 in a circular polisher (http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/polishers/7-inch-variable-speed-polisher-sander-92623.html). It cleaned up the oxidation quite nicely. Doing it by hand sounds like a recipe for getting discouraged.

Read some of the threads for the right procedure - I believe the best plan is a wool bonnet for the #49, and perhaps the terry bonnets for the #44 and the polish ( I don't remember precisely).

/frank

I agree. I got far better results with #49 and a polisher over doing it by hand. I also found that a second time with the #49 did the trick on an older boat of mine. The goal is removing just enough gel coat, leaving behind as much as possible, to restore the finish.

Thrall
11-29-2011, 04:42 PM
I've always just cleaned the pads with water. Flush them real good, spin them out a couple times, let dry.
I don't mix pads though. IE: the one that gets used for compund is compound only. Separate one for polish.