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ChuckD
08-08-2011, 10:14 PM
I have a 1988 PS190. On hard accelerations my engine bogs on fuel starvation - I have checked and replaced many things in the fuel system including a total rebuild of the Holley 4160. The fuel pump has correct pressure and I have determined that the fuel pickup must be clogged. I have searched the forums but I cannot find a procedure to remove the fuel pickup. I have loosened the top nut but I have not able to move/budge the fuel line connector at the top of the tank. Is there a correct procedure (without breaking the plastic tank) to remove the fuel pickup tube?

~Chuck

dpcsar
08-09-2011, 01:41 PM
I just cleaned my tank and the pickup had a rubber seal between the tank and hook up. I don't know a 'correct' procedure, but I just took the bolt out and worked it out by twisting it a little at a time to get the rubber seal to separate from the tank.

Kevin 89MC
08-10-2011, 09:59 AM
i just did mine this spring, thinking it was part of my fuel starvation issue. Turned out mine was the fuel filter, but anyways back to your question. After sliding my tank out, there was a rectangular plate screwed to the tank, which held the sending unit and the pickup. I did not need to remove the plate when changing out my sending unit several years ago, but it needed to come out for the pickup replacement, at least as far as I could tell. Unscrew all the screws, and there is a bottom ring to the plate inside the tank IIRC. This will allow you to get at the pickup. A word of caution, I snapped my anti-siphon valve (the elbow on the top side of the plate) when disassembling, there did not appear to be any anti-sieze on it from the factory. Fortunately my local MC dealer had it and a new pickup in stock. I should have taken pictures. Take soem of yours if you want and I can tell you what I did in more detail.
Good lock,
Kevin

ChuckD
08-11-2011, 11:55 AM
I have uploaded a picture of the fuel tank and the connector for the fuel line. I have loosened the main nut holding the connector in place but it doesn't seem to allow the connector and the pickup tube assembly to move. I have tried to twist it both CW and CCW but I am concerned the excess force may break/crack the tank near the connector. I have sprayed WD40 on the base of the connector, perhaps that will loosen it so that the tube can be removed. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Also, I haven't removed the actual tank yet. I was hoping that this would not be necessary.

dpcsar
08-12-2011, 05:14 PM
Your is different than mine. I have the same as "Kevin 89MC" described.

ChuckD
08-12-2011, 06:28 PM
hmmm, that's not encouraging... Does anyone have an idea of what is directly below the fuel connector (on the inside of the tank). I guess what I am trying to understand is if I can continue to turn the connector or if there is some other way to get to the fuel pick up. Thanks!

JimN
08-12-2011, 06:31 PM
I have a 1988 PS190. On hard accelerations my engine bogs on fuel starvation - I have checked and replaced many things in the fuel system including a total rebuild of the Holley 4160. The fuel pump has correct pressure and I have determined that the fuel pickup must be clogged. I have searched the forums but I cannot find a procedure to remove the fuel pickup. I have loosened the top nut but I have not able to move/budge the fuel line connector at the top of the tank. Is there a correct procedure (without breaking the plastic tank) to remove the fuel pickup tube?

~Chuck

If your pickup tube is clogged, you shouldn't have correct pressure.

ChuckD
08-12-2011, 09:38 PM
I have not connected a pressure gauge from the fuel pump, however, I did check the fuel flow and was only getting a volume of about 1/4 of a pint per 10 seconds. I then disconnected the fuel line at the tank and inserted the fuel line into a seperate container of gas and the fuel flow doubled to about 1/2 pint per 10 seconds. With this info, I determined that the reduced fuel flow was because of a clogged fuel line pickup in the tank. I just can't figure out how to get to it to clean it. BTW, I have replaced all of the filters along the entire fuel route - the main in-line fuel filter/water seperator, filter in the housing below the fuel pump and also the screen filter entering the carb. I will say that I found a lot of rust/crud, etc in all of the filters and I am guessing that the bottom of the fuel tank is just as bad.

JimN
08-13-2011, 09:49 AM
I think I would slide the tank out, for easier access. It's not too difficult unless it's full. If you tap on the aluminum block on top, it may break free- obviously, you don't want to beat on it too hard but if it's a corrosion issue, it may cause damage to the threads, regardless of how gentle you are- hopefully, that won't be the case. If you find that the the thread is damaged but not too bad, pipe dope (the kind that sets up firm) should keep it from leaking.

You could also pump gas through the pickup tube from the outside of the tank, too. A priming bulb (the kind used for an outboard motor) with a short section of hose, dipped into a gas can may clear it out. Then, with the plate that holds the sender removed, you may be able to see anything that comes out. I have seen all kinds of debris in gas tanks- gummy stuff, seeds, etc.

ChuckD
08-13-2011, 04:13 PM
Thanks, all... the tank is about 3/4 full. I will siphon it out and scoot it out some. Perhaps that and removing the sending unit plate will help. I am also wondering if blowing compressed air through the connector on top of the tank would hurt anything?

JimN
08-13-2011, 07:42 PM
Thanks, all... the tank is about 3/4 full. I will siphon it out and scoot it out some. Perhaps that and removing the sending unit plate will help. I am also wondering if blowing compressed air through the connector on top of the tank would hurt anything?

As long as the pressure isn't high, it should be OK to do that.

ChuckD
08-13-2011, 08:50 PM
Just as a update... After I siphoned the gas out, removing the tank was much easier than I thought it would be. With the tank out and the fuel sending unit removed, I was able to see the pickup tube. I was never able to remove the connector on top of the tank but I was able to "fish" the pickup tube thru the fuel fill inlet. Once the end of the pickup tube was out visable, I could see why I was getting poor fuel flow. I did not see any rust or krud buildup but I did see several slivers of plastic/fliberglass which I assume accumulated during the internal machining of the tank. With all the obstructions out of the way, I look forward to tomorrow's test!

Kevin 89MC
08-15-2011, 10:00 PM
I have moved my tank out with it mostly full. Not easy, but do-able, and may be easier than draining it IMHO. You won't (or shouldn't) be able to get gas or air backward through the fitting on the tank, as it should contain a functional anti-siphon valve. That may be part of your problem, if something is stuck in yours. My local MC dealer had one in stock after I broke mine.
Good luck,
Kevin