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Miss Rita
07-10-2011, 09:44 AM
I have a 20 year old SkiPro to go along with my 22 year old TriStar. The SkiPro seats need to be rebuilt. The back bench is about 5 feet wide, has a plywood base that is rotting and waterlogged.

Should I use new treated plywood, or is there a better option? TIA

gatorguy
07-10-2011, 09:55 AM
If you think getting another 22yrs out of the new seats is enough, plywood should do the trick. If not, you could look into building it all out of that really dense plastic like they make cutting boards out of. I'm sure it would cost an arm and a leg though. I think marine grade plywood properly glassed to waterproof it will last a very long time.

Matt L.
07-10-2011, 10:27 AM
I had my back swimdeck warp badly due to waterlogged plywood getting baked out in the Southern Airzona summer sun. I replaced it with a piece of 3/4" marine grade plywood 6-7 years ago. No problem since. Looked like it was originally 1/2" plywood.

I lined up the vinyl, then used a ladder and heavy duty ratchet straps to compress the foam enough to get the vinyl edges stapled to the new plywood. Worked pretty well! Used stiainless or Monel staples.

Starboard is another alternative to MG Ply. They make several grades of it. Pretty pricey as I seem to reacall.


http://www.kingplastic.com/products/applications/marinerv/

http://www.interstateplastics.com/search.php?withinsite=1&vid=201007270805-8p-C201007271129-44&material=&industry=marine&application=&design=&searchtext=starboard

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=13880&familyName=King+Starboard+Starlite+XL

Later,

Matt

east tx skier
07-10-2011, 11:53 AM
You could also do the base out of styrofoam insulation stacked and cut to shape. Find a glue that won't eat the styrofoam and use it to glue marine carpet to it. Make the seat bottom out of grated plywood and that will give you a good combination of strength and light weight.

gatorguy
07-10-2011, 12:43 PM
You could also do the base out of styrofoam insulation stacked and cut to shape. Find a glue that won't eat the styrofoam and use it to glue marine carpet to it. Make the seat bottom out of grated plywood and that will give you a good combination of strength and light weight.

I like this idea. The plywood rear seat I built weighs a ton.

CruisinGA
07-10-2011, 01:09 PM
If you use plywood treat it with Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer if you want it to last forever. I just used it when rebuilding the transom of an old aluminum boat based on the recommendation of another teamtalker and I was very impressed.

Miss Rita
07-10-2011, 01:33 PM
The seat is a nearly flat cushion, about 1.5 x 5 feet in size, that slides on top of a storage compartment. I don't have to build another pedestal, but that's an interesting project in itself. It appears that another piece of treated 5/8" plywood with a little sealer will probably serve the purpose. Thanks for all the advice.

east tx skier
07-10-2011, 06:24 PM
I like this idea. The plywood rear seat I built weighs a ton.

That's how the rear on my 93 205 was constructed with some strips of wood for stapling things to. I made the contours on my old jump seat like this. When I could not find a glue that didn't eat the styrofoam, I wrapped it in duck tape before carpeting. Worked like a charm.

Gabe63
07-11-2011, 11:54 AM
You can also go to TAP plastics if you have one and buy the same marine board (plastic) that Mastercraft uses on the newer boats. No more rot.

Doug W
07-11-2011, 01:40 PM
when i redid the interor in my tristar i used used 1/2 pvc and it worked great and i think it cost my like $250 for enough to do all of it.