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zpacheco
06-30-2011, 06:02 PM
Just wanted to start a thread and see what everyone does to their boats in the beginning of a season, or about every 100 hours. We put 100 hours on our boat since the last time it was taken to be serviced. I have done all of the oil changes about every 30 hours, but that is all I really know how to do. I would like to start doing a little more. I bought the indmar manual on my engine and think instead of spending 500 at the local boat service place that I want to start doing some more on my own. That being said, I was just curious to see what all you guys do to your own boats and don't rely on the dealer for. What's the easy stuff. Definitely don't want to tackle something that is over my head. Also, where do you go to buy parts needed for the job.

east tx skier
06-30-2011, 08:22 PM
This (http://www.tylerskiclub.com/winterization.html) is what I do each fall.

This (http://www.tylerskiclub.com/dewinterization.html) is what I do each spring.

More or less.

HDAVIS
07-01-2011, 06:45 PM
I winterize usually in October myself. I change oil and filter every 50 hrs or yearly which ever comes first. Usually change the impellar every other year. That is all I do. I let the guys at Rambo marine do the 100 hr service which basically includes plugs,dist cap, fuel filter, transmission service and maybe a few other things that it might need. It is expensive but it is worth it to me because they know what they are doing. I do not feel comfortable doing those things myself. In the past I have been "stuck" out in the middle of the lake and that is no fun. So, I decided when I bought my then new 1996 PS190 I would let the "pros" take care of my boat. So far I have not been stranded since, and it runs great.

krutzmart
07-02-2011, 01:56 PM
My friend has a 08 air nautique 220 with about 1200 hrs on it when it had a oil line let loose costing him a 6.0 L pcm marine engine. Not knowing how he serviced his boat I wounder.

So I have a couple of ?'s

1 - Who has friends with a nautique ? ( just kidding )

seariously

2- When do you service factory oil lines or even like oil re locater kit lines , gas lines, ect. ? Is it a hourly service like ( X ) amount of hours or is it one of those things you try to inspect every time your in your engine hatch doing some service looking for corrosion, and weather checking rubber, ect. ?

bigmac
07-02-2011, 02:30 PM
At the beginning of the season...nothing. I take it the lake and plop it in. Dealer "pickles" it with -100 propylene glycol every fall, so it's good to go. I haven't changed the raw water pump impeller in 5 years.

krutzmart
07-05-2011, 11:47 PM
Nice
Runner till the wheels fall off....
I'm just a little concerned about oil pressure lines on engine. They have some time on em now and I don't want to lose one. They look good,perfect, but about the time you think your good... your not.
Anyone know when they recomend you to service oil lines on engine ?

east tx skier
07-05-2011, 11:57 PM
Nice
Runner till the wheels fall off....
I'm just a little concerned about oil pressure lines on engine. They have some time on em now and I don't want to lose one. They look good,perfect, but about the time you think your good... your not.
Anyone know when they recomend you to service oil lines on engine ?

I don't know that there's a regular service interval on that. Sounds like something I'd try to catch in the hood up visual inspection I do when I hit the water.

And, Bigmac, 5 years on the impeller? Good luck with that. :o

bigmac
07-06-2011, 07:59 PM
And, Bigmac, 5 years on the impeller? Good luck with that. :o

I went 8 years on my previous boat. Luck seems to be holding so far...

Jorski
07-06-2011, 09:03 PM
It's short money to replace it before it breaks....;)

SPSinclair 190
07-06-2011, 09:09 PM
Im with bigmac 3 yrs and counting ! but checked on a regular basis !

east tx skier
07-06-2011, 09:15 PM
You guys are playing with fire. They are so cheap and easy to replace. Luck gives out when you need it the most.

I had to fish the remnants of a 3 year old impeller out of my father in law's engine once. From that experience, I'll do whatever I can to avoid the work when I would rather be skiing by replacing the impeller when it's still too cold by two weeks or so to go skiing.

I was just looking at boats earlier this year with my wife's cousin. Found out one of the sellers had changed the impeller once in 11 years. And then we started asking the rest of the questions. He didn't do much better after that although he had managed to change the oil once per year.

bigmac
07-07-2011, 01:35 PM
You guys are playing with fire. They are so cheap and easy to replace. Luck gives out when you need it the most.

I had to fish the remnants of a 3 year old impeller out of my father in law's engine once. From that experience, I'll do whatever I can to avoid the work when I would rather be skiing by replacing the impeller when it's still too cold by two weeks or so to go skiing.

I was just looking at boats earlier this year with my wife's cousin. Found out one of the sellers had changed the impeller once in 11 years. And then we started asking the rest of the questions. He didn't do much better after that although he had managed to change the oil once per year.

First of all, while I respect your experience and appreciate your concern Doug, I'm not a noob myself. I understand exactly what I'm playing with and the potential consequences.

When the impeller on my previous boat finally shredded after 8 years, I did indeed have to flush pieces out of the cooling passages. Wasn't a big deal. My current boat has a strainer downstream from the impeller. Chasing pieces of rubber if and when it becomes necessary will be no more difficult than pulling the cooler's raw water intake hose.

Third, your assertion that impellers are "easy to change" is relective of your unfamiliarity with some models of V-drives

Fourth, circumstances vary. My needs on my lake relative to limping in or getting towed in, replacing an impeller at the dock, and especially the ease of replacing an impeller are going to be different than yours.

Fifth, you imply that a conscious decision not to unnecessarily (in my cirucmstances) change my impeller is indicative of overall substandard maintenance. In my business, we call that "assuming facts not in evidence".

east tx skier
07-07-2011, 03:29 PM
First of all, while I respect your experience and appreciate your concern Doug, I'm not a noob myself. I understand exactly what I'm playing with and the potential consequences.

When the impeller on my previous boat finally shredded after 8 years, I did indeed have to flush pieces out of the cooling passages. Wasn't a big deal. My current boat has a strainer downstream from the impeller. Chasing pieces of rubber if and when it becomes necessary will be no more difficult than pulling the cooler's raw water intake hose.

Third, your assertion that impellers are "easy to change" is re[f]lective of your unfamiliarity with some models of V-drives

Fourth, circumstances vary. My needs on my lake relative to limping in or getting towed in, replacing an impeller at the dock, and especially the ease of replacing an impeller are going to be different than yours.

Fifth, you imply that a conscious decision not to unnecessarily (in my cir[cu]mstances) change my impeller is indicative of overall substandard maintenance. In my business, we call that "assuming facts not in evidence".

By all means, don't change your method if it suits you. I do not claim to be an expert on every subject. I do it this way because annual impeller changes in the spring is what my last two boat manufacturers and my good friend and certified tournament inboard mechanic recommend. I am truly happy your method works so well for you though, as you might suspect, I would not dream of adopting it as part of my own maintenance schedule.

As to your fifth point, however, I implied no such thing specific to your overall maintenance. I simply related an event that happened earlier this year involving another boat owner whose boat I was helping my wife's cousin to inspect. Because that owner did not have this rare and confusing "v-drive," with which I am apparently unfamiliar, it should be more plain that I was not making an analogy to your situation (remember, I have a PCM, which requires that I entirely remove the water pump to change the impeller). Plus, even were there an implication, that implication would be only that potential buyers could make this assumption based on little more.(*) In the end, since there was no intended implication, I am forced to point out that you are guilty of assuming that I made an assumption. ;)

(*)In my business, there is a difference between assuming facts not in evidence and circumstantial evidence, which is, in fact, evidence. The boat owner who was the subject of my original story gave other indications concerning his boat's care. His apathy toward this component of the raw water cooling system was merely the tip of the iceberg. Short of maintenance records, boat buyers are often required to rely on circumstantial evidence of a boat's condition. I am currently on my second used ski boat and my methods of evaluating the care taken of these two boats by previous owners often relies on this sort of circumstantial evidence of maintenance and care. So far, there have been few to no surprises in either of these boats.

Tuna Cowboy
07-07-2011, 03:34 PM
Change the oil every 30 hours? I guess that`s the same as 3000 miles....is that the way your looking at it? Good to no...I'm a third of the way there!

east tx skier
07-07-2011, 03:43 PM
-----Duplicate Post ----

HDAVIS
07-07-2011, 07:40 PM
I go 50 hrs between oil and filter changes. East Tex is right. I once learned the hard way. I noticed the temp went up a time or two. I just ignored it. Next weekend I had to work, son was in the boat by himself and the impellar went out at the course. I felt terrible. Luckily a friend of mine helped. Ever since I have kept an extra impellar in the glove compartment along with a screwdriver and a couple of paint can openers just in case.

GoneBoatN
07-07-2011, 08:03 PM
Just wanted to start a thread and see what everyone does to their boats in the beginning of a season, or about every 100 hours. We put 100 hours on our boat since the last time it was taken to be serviced. I have done all of the oil changes about every 30 hours, but that is all I really know how to do. I would like to start doing a little more. I bought the indmar manual on my engine and think instead of spending 500 at the local boat service place that I want to start doing some more on my own. That being said, I was just curious to see what all you guys do to your own boats and don't rely on the dealer for. What's the easy stuff. Definitely don't want to tackle something that is over my head. Also, where do you go to buy parts needed for the job.

Beginning of the season = new impeller because everything else was done at end of season.

I plan to have the dealer/shop do the 100/Yearly which I think will happen near the end of the season. I have not hit that mark yet as it is a relatively new boat.

Winterize I did myself last year. Since I have fuel injection, I just put the fogging oil down the spark plug holes and turn over the engine a bit without starting. Then I drainned the block of all water. I had all of a couple/few hours on oil so I did not change that. Winterized the ballast tanks using RV antifreeze. The area I'm in does not have much of a freezing issue and I keep the boat in the garage so that was just playing safe rather than sorry. I wanted to do it myself so that I had good reason to become familiar with the boat/engine. Basically I followed the instructions Eastie pointed to. Later I found out my dealer charges $99 for this service. I don't like others touching my boat unless they have too (see next section) but for that price vs the time spent I'll have to consider it next end of season.

I have a new boat and went with the warranty extention. Becasue of this, although not officially a requirement, I will let the dealer do the 100hr/Yearly service. I expect that this will happen about once a year so they become one and the same for me. At some point I suspect I will start doing more of the work myself.

I had an 1995 I/O. I did most of the work myself on the boat over the winter season. I would go as far as to take the engine out of the boat to clean it. It only took about 30 minutes to remove and 30 minutes to put back in. In many ways it saved time as it made getting to things a lot easier. I also did the yearly engine alignment at the same time. The only thing I would not work on was the gears and stuff inside the outdrive as they are rather complex and require many special tools. I obtained the OEM service manuals and found them not to difficult to follow for a lot of the required servicing routines. I'm not a mechanic, I did this for learning not to save money. I did find that I could buy the necessary tools and come out ahead. Alot is going to depend upon the model and year of your boat/engine/transmission.

I'd say do the work you feel you can and want to do. Be careful not to attempt something and cost yourself additional money, time wasted (not being able to use your boat) or worse. There is help available on this forum and others as well. Some of this is common sense. I think about replacing the Fuel Filter in mine. Opening the gas tank? What is more dangerous a tank mostly empty but full of fumes or a tank full of gas - doesn't matter both would be really dangerous and necessary precautions will need to be taken. Static discharge could be fatal... On the other hand, changing spark plugs and wires would be a no-brainer.

east tx skier
07-07-2011, 08:11 PM
I'd say do the work you feel you can and want to do. Be careful not to attempt something and cost yourself additional money, time wasted (not being able to use your boat) or worse. There is help available on this forum and others as well. Some of this is common sense. I think about replacing the Fuel Filter in mine. Opening the gas tank? What is more dangerous a tank mostly empty but full of fumes or a tank full of gas - doesn't matter both would be really dangerous and necessary precautions will need to be taken. Static discharge could be fatal... On the other hand, changing spark plugs and wires would be a no-brainer.

I agree with this sentiment wholeheartedly. There are plenty of things that need to be done with a boat that are either well above my pay grade or just unfamiliar to me. On some of these things, I have taken it to the dealer, who, when performing the service, will let me sit in and watch so that I can do it next time. Did I mention that my local dealer rules!

GoneBoatN
07-07-2011, 08:12 PM
I had an Alpha One Gen II I/O. Had to separate the lower and upper I/O unit to get to the impeller. It got an new impeller every year at the same time I removed to outdrive to do the yearly engine alignment as well.

I'd be too afraid of not noticing an overheat condition although I suspect an alarm will go off.

Sounds like the great (opinion) debate is on.

:uglyhamme

Ya gotta just love them there smilies.

MC4SNETS
07-08-2011, 02:23 AM
(*)In my business, there is a difference between assuming facts not in evidence and circumstantial evidence, which is, in fact, evidence. The boat owner who was the subject of my original story gave other indications concerning his boat's care. His apathy toward this component of the raw water cooling system was merely the tip of the iceberg. Short of maintenance records, boat buyers are often required to rely on circumstantial evidence of a boat's condition. I am currently on my second used ski boat and my methods of evaluating the care taken of these two boats by previous owners often relies on this sort of circumstantial evidence of maintenance and care. So far, there have been few to no surprises in either of these boats.

To each his own when applying maintenence to his or her own boat. However, I will boil down ETS's methodology regarding a previous owner's apathy toward maintenance:

When you shop for a used boat, shop for the owner, not the boat. You will find the exact boat you want in several different prices from several different owners. I'd buy ETS's boat for the extra $30 he put in each year for a new impeller....and I'd pay more for it (market value).......not because it has a new impeller, because I knows he cares.....which translates to caring about things you won't even think of.

Selling a boat in your future? be that owner.

bigmac
07-08-2011, 11:55 AM
A raw water pump impeller isn't a maintenance item, it's a repair item. They either work or they don't. If your raw water pump is keeping the engine water temp at 160, then it's working. When they don't work, replace it. Yes, you have to pay attention to your water temp gauge while using the boat, just like you do routinely, whether you have a new impeller or one that's 5 years old. If it fails and the temp goes too high, you shut it down and tow it back to the dock with one of your neighbors (your dock is only a couple of miles away), put it in the lift and change it. Or, you change right there on the water. After all, Doug has explained to us that changing that impeller is simple. No harm done, unless you're oblivious or stupid enough to ignore an overheating engine and the multiple warning signs and gauges that indicate that. And as we've seen, a new impeller isn't a guarantee against such a failure and certainly doesn't relieve you of the responsibility of monitoring your engine gauges, or performance, or smell.

Now...if you don't live on a lake where you have friends and neighbors, or if you are incapable of changing the impeller when it fails (it's really easy, remember), or are negligent in paying attention to the function of your boat, then maybe changing that impeller every year, or every week, will give you an edge against an unplanned and slightly inconvenient repair. I've owned boats and used them and maintained them regularly for over 35 years. None of the above applies to me, and nothing in my long boating experience convinces me that that bit of maintenance lore is universally true or worth the blind faith that so many give it. Your experience, your situation, and and your opinion may vary. That doesn't invalidate mine.

east tx skier
07-08-2011, 12:27 PM
A raw water pump impeller isn't a maintenance item, it's a repair item. They either work or they don't. If your raw water pump is keeping the engine water temp at 160, then it's working. When they don't work, replace it. Yes, you have to pay attention to your water temp gauge while using the boat, just like you do routinely, whether you have a new impeller or one that's 5 years old. If it fails and the temp goes too high, you shut it down and tow it back to the dock with one of your neighbors (your dock is only a couple of miles away), put it in the lift and change it. Or, you change right there on the water. After all, Doug has explained to us that changing that impeller is simple. No harm done, unless you're oblivious or stupid enough to ignore an overheating engine and the multiple warning signs and gauges that indicate that. And as we've seen, a new impeller isn't a guarantee against such a failure and certainly doesn't relieve you of the responsibility of monitoring your engine gauges, or performance, or smell.

Now...if you don't live on a lake where you have friends and neighbors, or if you are incapable of changing the impeller when it fails (it's really easy, remember), or are negligent in paying attention to the function of your boat, then maybe changing that impeller every year, or every week, will give you an edge against an unplanned and slightly inconvenient repair. I've owned boats and used them and maintained them regularly for over 35 years. None of the above applies to me, and nothing in my long boating experience convinces me that that bit of maintenance lore is universally true or worth the blind faith that so many give it. Your experience, your situation, and and your opinion may vary. That doesn't invalidate mine.

Not to further split hairs, but I think all maintenance items become repair items if you wait for them to fail.

Nonetheless, I agree that you need to keep your eye on the engine temp, even with a new impeller. I had a new one go on me this year due to a belt not being tensioned properly and getting thrown. The water pump housing heated up and, the best I can tell, the impeller blades got hot enough to stick. Got the belt back on and cranked it up and it ripped about 75% of the blades off. That temperature will rise fast. Fortunately, I was not in one of my moments of being oblivious, stupid :rolleyes:, or looking at the ten other things that demand a boat driver's attention and noticed it quickly. Spent the next hour removing the water pump, replacing the impeller, getting the water pump back on and retentioning the belts. Yes, it's easy, but it's my preference to do this little chore in my garage in February rather than outdoors in heat of a Texas summer.

In all sincerity, I hope you get 15 years out of the thing.

bigmac
07-08-2011, 04:07 PM
Your garage in February is a different temperature than mine in February, and the heat of a Minnesota summer is different than the heat of a Texas summer. It's 82 degrees right now with a dew point of 55, and most of us up here find THAT oppressive. What maintenance I don't have my dealer do every year is most easily, for me, done in my boat lift. Nice and cool there, gentle lapping of the waves, etc etc. But I do take your point.

At any rate, my dealer does all my winterizing chores and annual maintenance items these days because I prefer to have the boat "pickled" for the winter by filling the engine and associated parts with -100 propylene glycol. One side effect of that is that the raw water impeller never dries out.

bigmac
07-08-2011, 04:14 PM
In all sincerity, I hope you get 15 years out of the thing.

Thanks, but honestly, I don't care if I do or not. If/when it fails, I'll replace it. They're $30, a drop in the bucket, and I have at least one spare, probably more.

east tx skier
07-08-2011, 04:16 PM
Good weekend to you, Doctor.

bigmac
07-08-2011, 05:58 PM
Good weekend to you, Doctor.

Thanks Doug. And to you. May all your boating problems be $30 or less.

kevkan
07-08-2011, 06:45 PM
I owned an '85 S&S for 24 years and always winterized it myself. With that PCM, I usually took apart (seperated) the raw water pump during the winterization. I never found any vanes missing, but about 3 times, I think, there were cracks. Those were the only times I replaced an impeller in 24 years.

When I bought the new boat, the dealer, who is a very nice guy that I trust, told me to replace the impeller each year. I'm not sure I can bring myself to throw away a $30 part that is perfectly good.

Of course, with the old boat, a piece of emory cloth could solve nearly every problem I ever had...

east tx skier
07-09-2011, 12:39 AM
Thanks Doug. And to you. May all your boating problems be $30 or less.

They were $300 last weekend. But going forward, I can at least be glad I get my impellers for $19. :)

rand49er
09-21-2011, 09:44 AM
Seems like a good time resurrect this thread.

This (http://www.tylerskiclub.com/winterization.html) is what I do each fall. ...Great list. Even though I've winterized my '89 Malibu in the past myself, this list gave me some additional tips to follow.

We put only about 5.5 hours on the boat this summer ... just too busy. I'm inclined to not change the oil/filter because of this low usage, but I'm going to do it anyway, otherwise I wouldn't be able to sleep all winter. :cool:

thatsmrmastercraft
09-21-2011, 09:49 AM
Seems like a good time resurrect this thread.

Great list. Even though I've winterized my '89 Malibu in the past myself, this list gave me some additional tips to follow.

We put only about 5.5 hours on the boat this summer ... just too busy. I'm inclined to not change the oil/filter because of this low usage, but I'm going to do it anyway, otherwise I wouldn't be able to sleep all winter. :cool:

It's that time again for many of us on here.

LYNRDSKYNRD
09-21-2011, 10:09 AM
Im with bigmac 3 yrs and counting ! but checked on a regular basis !

3 years on mine but I keep a the new one with gasket and tools on the boat. I have taken it out the last three years to replace it but it looks great so I just put it back in and keep trucking.

GoneBoatN
09-21-2011, 11:54 AM
It's that time again for many of us on here.

I think I'm going to hold out until there is snow in the mountains this year. The heck with that to-do list.:headbang:

76S&S
09-21-2011, 12:12 PM
I prefer to have the boat "pickled" for the winter by filling the engine and associated parts with -100 propylene glycol. One side effect of that is that the raw water impeller never dries out.

I've done this for over 30 years and periodically change an impeller just because I "think" it has to be time, but I've never had one go bad.