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dash8fo
07-24-2005, 12:52 PM
I just bought a 1990 Prostar 190 with 351 Inmar. The voltage on the dash is reading about 11.5. Any of this ever happen to anyone? What was your fix. Where is the voltage regulator? Any downloadable schematics? Any advice?

Leroy
07-24-2005, 01:02 PM
Welcome to the board!



It could just be the meter not reading right, does it start ok? Any other symptoms that make you think the battery is weak? Those meters are notoriously wrong.

dash8fo
07-24-2005, 09:56 PM
It starts very sluggish. For instance, it would maybe turn a couple times and then it may fire up. Battery was hot at the time as well.

scott88prostar
07-24-2005, 10:18 PM
I just attached my multi meter to the battery posts ....checked the voltage then started the boat and ran it....the voltage was off on the low end by 1.75 volts....on the high end it was right on.

Kevin 89MC
08-12-2005, 11:29 AM
I just put a brand new battery in my '89, and the gauge reads 11.5 also. It starts great though. I'll throw a meter on mine sometime to check, too, but I would also agree that our factory gauges are likely a bit off.
Kevin

Oh yeah, for the hard starting issue, make sure you're using a good STARTING battery, not a marine deep cycle battery. This has been discussed at length on other posts. If it is hot, that could mean your cables are getting old and causing more resistance. If your battery is more than a few years old, I'd just replace it, then look into the cables.
Good luck.
Kevin

BG1772
08-12-2005, 12:46 PM
It could be the field wire on the alternator (small 14 or 16 gauge wire on alternator). If it does not have a good connection, the alternator will not produce a charge. So, your volt gage may be accurate for what the batter is putting out.

This happened to me once.

Workin' 4 Toys
08-12-2005, 03:44 PM
I just bought a 1990 Prostar 190 with 351 Inmar. The voltage on the dash is reading about 11.5. Any of this ever happen to anyone? What was your fix. Where is the voltage regulator? Any downloadable schematics? Any advice?
The reg should be in the alternator. Should read between 13 and 14 while running, use a meter at the gauge to tell you if its right. Also test the battery and the alternator. Post your results.

larrym
07-17-2007, 10:15 PM
I have a 89 351 tristar. The new alt from skidim shows 13.5 volts on a mulitmeter. I have a new batt, starter and carb from the MasterCraft dealer here in Lake Sint Louis but the batt still goes dead. New cables too. The dash reads 11 volts and slowly goes down. I'll get a couple of starts out of a fresh charge then nothing. What else is in the charging system other than cables and alt?

etduc
07-18-2007, 10:32 AM
I have a 89 351 tristar. The new alt from skidim shows 13.5 volts on a mulitmeter. I have a new batt, starter and carb from the MasterCraft dealer here in Lake Sint Louis but the batt still goes dead. New cables too. The dash reads 11 volts and slowly goes down. I'll get a couple of starts out of a fresh charge then nothing. What else is in the charging system other than cables and alt?

Does battery go dead, overnight or after a couple of days sitting?

Obvious, direct short.

First look at ignition switch and wiring around switch. Also, check you cigarette lighter (they stick), and wiring to it (this is a non fused circuit). Check the lead to the electric choke. (bare spots, pinched wire)

Second, look to accessory wiring, wiring going to gages.

Try this. Remove all wires from switch, except those for starting and running engine. Isolate your gages, from run(on) circuit. Check you voltage. If you still have voltage drop, your short is limited to switch, and wiring after the switch going to engine. If you don't have voltage drop, add one wire at time to the switch, testing the voltage.

Wiring on older boats, can be a little "inventive", so you have to do some investigating. Basically, you have to reduce the size of your search. Eliminate one area, at a time. Test the results, as you go. Don't assume.

I hate wiring problems.

cwright
07-18-2007, 11:18 AM
Wow, dejavu. I just asked that question. It seems to be a coomon problem that the volt meter on the dash is inaccurate. You have to sleuth out your problems with a multi tester. Your voltage regulator is built into your alt. You should get 13.5 to 14 at your battery while running, even though your dash guage will show 12. Battery should read 12.5 to 12.8 sitting with the boat off. If you have those readings, do resistance checks on all of your leads. The one that bit me was the 14" lead from selonoid to starter. Get it figured out quick though or your starter is the next casualty. low vlotage starting seems to bring about a quick death and replacements are ~$200, rebuilds around $130.

When you resistance check you leads, move them during the test test. I could create vitually no resistance on my selonoid lead and them bend it and lose everything. Bad lead, killed my starter before I caught it.

I am ignoring my dash guage this summer, using it only as a benchmark to track changes. This winter I am redoing all of my ground wires and may replace my volt meter at the time just to try to get the thing to read correctly. Good luck

snowaterskier
08-06-2007, 02:49 AM
I recently purchased a 1996 ProStar 190.
The original owner was complaing about his battery going dead all the time. I did not want this problem so I started right out with my DMM checking the current draw from the battery with everything turned off.
Sure enogh, there was 130ma of current flowing with the key out of the ignition. He had installed a after market stereo and connected the Memory lead directly to the battery. This in combination with the clock was draining the battery. I moved the stereo power with its memory wire to the stereo power wires under the dash and replaced the clock with a depth finder using the power lead from the fuel gage - only turns on with the key. Now I get ZERO ma current flow with the key off - no more dead battery !!! :} NOTE: to measure current flow at the battery, remove the ground lead on the battery and place the DMM leads between the Ground lead and negative post on the battery. Be sure the DMM is set to current mode and the DMM leads are plugged into the correct DMM slots for measuring current.