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UrbantuxTN
04-28-2011, 08:23 AM
I have taken my new x-15 out about three times now. I just can't get the hang of close quarters maneuvering. I felt like a complete tool trying to pull up to the gas dock and missing the unleaded pump by a mile and having to be pulled along the dock by the "Gas Girl". To add to it I get frustrated and/or nervous and it makes it worse. I have the same problem trying to get the boat back in my slip.. although given the fact it is only 10 feet wide I don't feel so bad about having a hard time hitting it dead on.

What can I do to get the hang of it or am I just destined for failure?

samgreazy
04-28-2011, 08:26 AM
Haha you'll get it, just give some time

Justjoe
04-28-2011, 08:26 AM
Get a case of beer. Go to the lake and drive.

UrbantuxTN
04-28-2011, 08:27 AM
Get a case of beer. Go to the lake and drive.

hrmm... pretty sure after a case I may park the boat on top of the guy in the next slip over... :D

Justjoe
04-28-2011, 08:27 AM
Oh, and use the beer to fill the boat with women (who can fend off when needed).

SkiDog
04-28-2011, 08:27 AM
I have taken my new x-15 out about three times now. I just can't get the hang of close quarters maneuvering. I felt like a complete tool trying to pull up to the gas dock and missing the unleaded pump by a mile and having to be pulled along the dock by the "Gas Girl". To add to it I get frustrated and/or nervous and it makes it worse. I have the same problem trying to get the boat back in my slip.. although given the fact it is only 10 feet wide I don't feel so bad about having a hard time hitting it dead on.

What can I do to get the hang of it or am I just destined for failure?

Practice, Practice, & MORE practice. Go to a remote spot where nobody will bother you, find a dock thats not being used, and practice docking. You'll get it, just don't tear the boat up in the process!;)

Justjoe
04-28-2011, 08:29 AM
Just take your time, and realize the more time you spend doing it....the better you'll get at...doing it.

HDAVIS
04-28-2011, 08:33 AM
SkiDog is right on. Just takes practice.

agarabaghi
04-28-2011, 08:33 AM
ah... don't be that guy.

Eventually you will be able to just cruise on into your spot / trailer / gas dock with ease. My dad gets so angry that i can dock the boat while sitting down in the driver seat texting... He is the type who is always trying to bounce it off things... Also remember our boats only reverse 1 way lol

willyt
04-28-2011, 08:34 AM
haha 3 times? give it some more time and watch some maneuvering videos. I believe the book's first DVD had some boating maneuvering lessons. Not sure if TSO has any lessons. I wouldnt worried about being embarassed, everyone's probably too distracted by your 2011 to notice.

it can definitely take a little while to get used to the inboard.

davidstan
04-28-2011, 08:34 AM
Go slow and use reverse at the very last second.

UrbantuxTN
04-28-2011, 08:39 AM
Oh, and use the beer to fill the boat with women (who can fend off when needed).

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?p=748568&posted=1#post748568

Check!

Mgboyd25
04-28-2011, 09:06 AM
Practice brother we have all learned at one time so don't feel bad! You will get it. Just take it slow, don't be afraid to move slowly in and out of gear creeping up to docks and your slips instead of keeping it in gear all the way till your at the dock. When you practice try to learn using the reverse to your advantage by putting the boat in reverse and steering the wheel towards the right which will turn the back of the boat to the right. Just remember to give yourself room and that the first scratch hurts the worst lol

etduc
04-28-2011, 09:15 AM
You can Youtube, anything. sorry wrong brand. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Px6AkkKHb4&feature=related

scott023
04-28-2011, 09:16 AM
I was in the same boat as you two years ago. Seemed that I couldn't jockey the boat around in any tight spaces or get it on the trailer first try. Like others have said, just keep practicing, you'll be a pro in no time.

JohnE
04-28-2011, 09:33 AM
Fortunately Scott had his wife to maneuver the boat and load it on the trailer until he learned.:D

Thrall
04-28-2011, 09:36 AM
Yeah, noone is really watching your skillz. They're too mesmerized by your boat.
Some situations you shoulnd't even attempt and if you have to make an off-side dock (maybe your boat has fuel fillers on both sides though?) at the gas pump, so be it.
Know anyone with an older MC or other LH drive ski boat?
I'd say a little ski boat is easier to learn on. You have to empoly the same methods, they just react quicker to the input. My buddy just bought an X15. 1st tow boat he's owned. He'd driven my 190 quite a few times, no trouble docking it. He called me after test driving the 15 and was really surprised at how much more difficult it was to maneuver than the ski boat.

The easiest way I learned to dock was to dock on the starboard side as thats the way reverse will pull the boat, approcach the dock at almost 90deg to the dock, slooow. When the bow is 20' or so from the dock cut hard left, go to neutral. This is all in and out of gear slow stuff. This will start the boat coming around to parallel. Bump reverse, this will bring it farther around. Fwd/Rev bumps 2-3x should lay it in sideways real easy.
Remember when you take off from a side dock, when you turn the steering wheel away from the dock, the @ss end of the boat will come around closer to the dock momentarily. If you're not far enough out form the dock and turn away sharply, you'll tear up the swim deck!

Willski
04-28-2011, 09:45 AM
Basic principles. Go slow. Short bursts of throttle. You can't steer if you're not moving. I like to dock on the driver's side, approaching the dock at about 30-45 degrees. As the bow gets close, touch reverse, and the back end will come around. What alot of people forget is that you can only steer the back end of the boat, not the front like a car.

flipper
04-28-2011, 09:52 AM
Throw a couple fenders out or something in the middle of the lake. Practice approaching out in the middle where nobody can watch until you got it down.

Iskidaily
04-28-2011, 09:54 AM
practicing on a new boat in a busy place with a crowd watching is a really tough way to learn. I'd agree with the advice above about finding a quiet place to practice with low wind and waves. Also maybe try watching someone else to see how they do it. trying by yourself can make it seem like black magic. Good luck!

pmkkdx
04-28-2011, 10:16 AM
yep, as others have stated take your time! practice out in open water to get the hang of the boat using the tips from the Utube video above, along with those Willski & Thrall stated!!! slow and easy, bumping forward & reverse remembering reversing will pull the tail end of the boat towards the starboard (drivers) side. I could put my '83 S&S in the smallest of openings at a dock, but still haven't completely mastered the current '04 X2 as it is much bigger and doesn't manuever near as quickly. But building some skills in open water will build your confidence and hopefully prevent you from wacking the dock or another boat.

GT500 MC
04-28-2011, 10:28 AM
UrbanTx- fwiw, I'm in the same boat (no pun intended) right now. Went from i/o to x14v over winter. I'm quickly noticing that it's best to pull up on starboard side (when possible) for everything. But I still haven't figured out the backing up piece--these inboards were definitely intended to go straight forward, not back.

One question for the group--is it hard on the vdrive to be going from forward to reverse quickly? And I don't mean slamming it from 4k rpms in drive to reverse (I get that) but real low rpm's back and forth for centering, even when loading on trailer? I was just curious as to the durability of the drive?

rjracin240
04-28-2011, 12:17 PM
I have taken my new x-15 out about three times now. I just can't get the hang of close quarters maneuvering. I felt like a complete tool trying to pull up to the gas dock and missing the unleaded pump by a mile and having to be pulled along the dock by the "Gas Girl". To add to it I get frustrated and/or nervous and it makes it worse. I have the same problem trying to get the boat back in my slip.. although given the fact it is only 10 feet wide I don't feel so bad about having a hard time hitting it dead on.

What can I do to get the hang of it or am I just destined for failure?

Not sure where you are in the South East, I am in the Jacksonville Fl area with a PS 190 that I would be more than happy to practice with. Just shoot me a PM

blakehardesty
04-28-2011, 12:57 PM
I must just be a natural because im d@mn good at it. lol

Ben
04-28-2011, 01:05 PM
Also, instead of trying near a dock (especially if you don't have access), simply throw a lifejacket or the square floaty thing in the water in a calm spot. Practice pulling up to that. This helped with my wife a lot more than the boat ramp / trailer pressure did.

supturb89
04-28-2011, 01:06 PM
[QUOTE=GT500 MC;748595]UrbanTx- fwiw, I'm in the same boat (no pun intended) right now. Went from i/o to x14v over winter. I'm quickly noticing that it's best to pull up on starboard side (when possible) for everything. But I still haven't figured out the backing up piece--these inboards were definitely intended to go straight forward, not back.

When backing the boat and the stern is coming around too far, cut the wheel all the way to the right and quickly bump the throttle forward. This will bring the stern back the opposite way. Using this procedure in succession (reverse, forward, reverse, forward) allows you to back the boat in a relatively straight path.

Sodar
04-28-2011, 01:06 PM
Until you get the hang of it, avoid ever coming up to the dock on your Port Side. Once you understand how to jockey it around, then you can start doing the stuff that will impress the ladies and the gas girl.

aaron.
04-28-2011, 02:21 PM
add some fast current and high winds.... now that's a real treat.

Skipper
04-28-2011, 03:51 PM
From a stop, even if you turn the wheel all of the way right (or left) all the way then put the boat in gear it will make a wide sweeping turn. If you slip it into gear for a second or two then back to neutral pause a few seconds and repeat, then you can practically spin 360 degrees. Works in forward or reverse. Just takes a little patience.

ShamrockIV
04-28-2011, 03:57 PM
time is all u need.
always pull up on the starboard side.
it takes a little finesse.
come in turned to the left a little. then turn wheel to the right and leave it. bump throttle in and out. in and out. no a fast process but u will get the hang of it.

dont worry when i switch to my dads i/o pontoon. the whole being able to steer in reverse kills me LOL

1redTA
04-28-2011, 04:01 PM
the reason it is a Master Craft is because not any yahoo can drive it with precision.
I wouldn't feel bad about maneuvering until after the summer is over and after using and getting to know the boat. If you still suck, by an I/O :-)

ShamrockIV
04-28-2011, 04:08 PM
the reason it is a Master Craft is because not any yahoo can drive it with precision.
I wouldn't feel bad about maneuvering until after the summer is over and after using and getting to know the boat. If you still suck, by an I/O :-)

priceless!!!!!! lol

CruisinGA
04-28-2011, 04:53 PM
Like folks have said, once you realize there is only one good way to approach a dock, get used to the one-sided reverse and use it to your advantage, and finally get the hang of planning your approaches so you don't really have to think about it, you'll be good.

Really, it just takes practice. And not getting frustrated.;)

cdstukey
04-28-2011, 08:25 PM
One question for the group--is it hard on the vdrive to be going from forward to reverse quickly? And I don't mean slamming it from 4k rpms in drive to reverse (I get that) but real low rpm's back and forth for centering, even when loading on trailer? I was just curious as to the durability of the drive?

Shouldn't be too much of an issue as you have to go through neutral to get to reverse, but I would try to coast a little in neutral anyways. I generally try to avoid reverse when loading, it pulls you off center and is a good way to ding up a prop. Our general rule is once the bow goes through the guide post the boat should be in neutral until its in the bunks. Chances are if you are still off line when you are that close you're probably going to hit something anyways and you are better off not having the prop spinning when you do.

bailey78
04-28-2011, 09:09 PM
I haven't read all the comments but less is more. don't oversteer, little throttle, and get used to it.

Thrall
04-29-2011, 02:07 AM
Shouldn't be too much of an issue as you have to go through neutral to get to reverse, but I would try to coast a little in neutral anyways. I generally try to avoid reverse when loading, it pulls you off center and is a good way to ding up a prop. Our general rule is once the bow goes through the guide post the boat should be in neutral until its in the bunks. Chances are if you are still off line when you are that close you're probably going to hit something anyways and you are better off not having the prop spinning when you do.

In a pinch, it's not going to destroy the trans to got straight thru from fwd to rev, even gunning it in reverse. As cd said though, good practice to pause in neutral and let the prop stop spinning.

defender1009
04-29-2011, 08:48 AM
Since you're not getting a ton of details, here's a tip. It is MUCH easier to learn if you are approaching a dock on your starboard side. Approach the dock at idle speed at approximately a 45 degree angle----basically if you didn't follow the next steps, your bow would be the first thing to hit the dock and it would hit at a spot that's approximately even with the base of your windshield.

When you are about 15 feet away from the dock, put your boat in neutral, and keep coasting in. When you get about 10 feet away, you want to turn your steering wheel to the right, and engage reverse. The prop rotation is naturally going to pull the stern to starboard, and by the time you are at the dock, you will be completely parallel to the dock at a speed that is almost a dead stop.

If you screw up, just use tiny corrections with engaging forward or reverse....it's not like a stern drive where you have to give it some gas to make sudden corrections happen.

As for backing it in? I got nuthin for you. It ain't easy due to the aforementioned tendency of the stern to move to starboard when backing.

nmcjr
04-29-2011, 07:56 PM
The way I see a lot of people get in trouble is with too much throttle input, i.e. they approach the dock too fast and then use a lot of reverse. Too much reverse has unpredictable results (only use a lot of reverse if really necessary, not as a rule). Eventually you can do everything faster, but until you learn, cut the throttle long before the dock so you are barely moving by the time you reach it at a 45 degree angle or so. Then, several feet before you get to the dock go to reverse idle (first click in reverse) and allow it to slow. If you need more forward or to adjust your approach go to forward idle and turn if necessary then back to reverse and so forth. If you get all screwed up, stop the boat, push away from the dock by hand if needed and start over-no shame in that and you can't get into any trouble when stopped, so if in doubt just stop and re-group.

A typical approach for me pulling up to a dock may easily involve 3-4 forward and reverse engagements. Eventually you really won't steer much, but rather use reverse like a side thruster. A great exercise is to learn to spin the boat counter clockwise while barely moving forward or backward. Forward and left turn, reverse and right turn and repeat. Do this out in the open.

I always tell people I am teaching not to approach the dock any faster than you are prepared to run into it-that will keep you out of trouble, and as a rule its about accuracy not speed anyway. Here is an OK video on the subject, although I would suggest going even slower than in the video to begin with, maybe 1/4 the speed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Px6AkkKHb4&feature=related

milkmania
04-30-2011, 12:08 AM
pics of the gas girl would help :twocents:

if she's a little cutie, I'd never learn how to dock the danged thing :rolleyes:

Willski
04-30-2011, 12:29 AM
pics of the gas girl would help :twocents:

if she's a little cutie, I'd never learn how to dock the danged thing :rolleyes:

I agree. I would drive within about 5 feet of the dock and throw a rope. See if you can pull her into the water!

Willski
04-30-2011, 12:41 AM
I think this thread has provided info overload. Find place with no wind and current and practice.

Knowledge and experience of how your boat reacts is the only way to learn!bv

kevkan
04-30-2011, 01:46 PM
What are we talkin about? Practice? Practice!?! Look, I understand its about TeamTalk, and all, but we talkin about practice!

Oh, and it is best to not practice in front of a crowd, or with a bunch of hotties you are trying to impress. Start out real slow. Oh, and very important... I don't suggest having passengers try to grab the dock to stop the boat. A hand/arm smashed between boat and dock is a real mess. I tell my passengers to keep their hands inside the boat till I turn off the engine, and then grab on to hold us till I get the thing tied up.

2RLAKE
05-01-2011, 09:05 AM
hey i remember when a few of our friends finally converted into inboards and watching them for the first time .... just takes a while ... i guess i was there in '89 too that's just too long ago to remember. I remember one couple pulling up to happy hour for the first time in their new X30 ... he noses straight in and his wife is there to catch him and walk the boat into position ... he spent the next few weekends practicing and was the proudly crowned an expert docker

it will come ... just takes time

Iskidaily
05-18-2011, 04:56 PM
My wife had a proud moment this weekend. She parked the boat in the boathouse. No help from anyone. 2 things got her there: 1) go slow 2) practice