PDA

View Full Version : Starting out of water.


will300
03-09-2011, 10:01 AM
Will someone explain how I should start my Mastercraft outside of the water. When I bought the boat it came with the plunger to start it out of the water. I was curious where i hook this up at under the boat or other tips i need to know. Thanks

CantRepeat
03-09-2011, 10:04 AM
You're going to get some recommendations to not use the fake-o-lake plunger. These boats pull more water then the plunger and garden hose can supply.

But, there is a water intake on the bottom of the boat, should be brass, the plunger goes around that port.


What a lot of people do is remove the water intake house from the inside the engine bay and put that into a 5 gallon buck and then fill the bucket with water and run the hose that way. Then you can see just how much water is being suck in the boat.

j4rowell
03-09-2011, 10:17 AM
You're going to get some recommendations to not use the fake-o-lake plunger. These boats pull more water then the plunger and garden hose can supply.

But, there is a water intake on the bottom of the boat, should be brass, the plunger goes around that port.


What a lot of people do is remove the water intake house from the inside the engine bay and put that into a 5 gallon buck and then fill the bucket with water and run the hose that way. Then you can see just how much water is being suck in the boat.


Yup.............

east tx skier
03-09-2011, 10:26 AM
What a lot of people do is remove the water intake house from the inside the engine bay and put that into a 5 gallon buck[et] and then fill the bucket with water and run the hose that way. Then you can see just how much water is being suck in the boat.

Put me in the camp which prefers this method over the plunger with a hose attached to it.

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 12:20 PM
Here is the set-up with a valve for the hose to attach to one an operation. Going with a 10 gallon plastic tub this year. Won't run out of water so fast.

GT500 MC
03-09-2011, 12:26 PM
Why the valve for the hose? Simply to hold the hose in place? Water intake hose just sucks the water from the bottom of the pail?

coz
03-09-2011, 12:34 PM
Or you can do this and hook your hose right up to it and not worry about dragging a heavy bucket of water into the boat.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2799/4049429037_1ab6a328a3_z.jpg?zz=1

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2698/4050183094_4fa65abc48.jpg

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 12:37 PM
Why the valve for the hose? Simply to hold the hose in place? Water intake hose just sucks the water from the bottom of the pail?

You can get the pail set up in the boat, then fill it up using the valve. Once you get the boat started, you can reach over and open the valve to keep filling the bucket. When you are done, shut the valve off and let the engine pump most of the water out. This also works great for winterizing when you are putting RV antifreeze in.

j4rowell
03-09-2011, 01:29 PM
Why the valve for the hose? Simply to hold the hose in place? Water intake hose just sucks the water from the bottom of the pail?

He's an over achiever. I'd do it too if I had the stuff lying around.

pmkkdx
03-09-2011, 01:42 PM
I have seen several posts / threads relating to the bucket method ... which I think is a great idea!!! ... and very simple to accomplish on a direct drive where you have access to the engine ...

but how do you do similarly on a V-drive ('04 X2) with limited access to engine / hoses???

TRBenj
03-09-2011, 01:47 PM
Or you can do this and hook your hose right up to it and not worry about dragging a heavy bucket of water into the boat.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2799/4049429037_1ab6a328a3_z.jpg?zz=1

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2698/4050183094_4fa65abc48.jpg
Finally, someone with a brain!

Simplicity is beauty.

Just be mindful to plumb your tee in before the tranny cooler... the pump still spins in neutral and will heat up if it sees no cooling water.

87MCProstar
03-09-2011, 01:53 PM
I love that idea, wicked smart. Thats probably why I didn't even think that. where would i put it in a 351?

Tim hows the BFN?

TRBenj
03-09-2011, 02:06 PM
Howdy Tim.:wavey:

The BFN is (still) coming along. We're buttoning up the inside so we should be able to drop the motor back in when the ice clears and snow melts.

The CC/PCM Fords routed the cooling line under, around and over the transmission, leaving a great place to put the tee. I put my strainer right next to it on my '90... here's where I put it on the Tique:

http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e260/TRBenj/trannypaint.jpg

Im not familiar enough with the MC configuration to comment... we had to get a little more creative on our Conquerers and Interceptors.

muskingumriverdocks
03-09-2011, 02:15 PM
Store bought, I like it. I've always made my own use a ball valve for shut off. Bucket idea is a good one beats wegding one under the boat rolling around on the ground.

east tx skier
03-09-2011, 02:34 PM
Or you can do this and hook your hose right up to it and not worry about dragging a heavy bucket of water into the boat.


Finally, someone with a brain!


In my case, I don't have the water pressure at the house to keep up with demands of the boat. I know that because I can watch the boat drain the bucket from full with the hose running in it while the boat is at idle. Now as long as the pump housing is getting enough water to keep from burning up the impeller, I don't think this will hurt the engine in the overheating sense if you aren't running the boat for too long.

I have done the shove the garden hose in an old section of raw water hose attached to the transmission cooler before in a pinch. It works, but I still have my preference and don't recommend the other because knowing if someone's water pressure can keep up with the demands of the boat is an unknown.

As for simplicity, the bucket method costs less than $10, takes all of a few minutes to setup and tear down, and has no ball valve to forget to close. The bucket is not heavy if you don't fill it up before you put it in the boat and drain it most of the way down before shutting off.

Brains :rolleyes:

Thrall
03-09-2011, 02:37 PM
I have seen several posts / threads relating to the bucket method ... which I think is a great idea!!! ... and very simple to accomplish on a direct drive where you have access to the engine ...

but how do you do similarly on a V-drive ('04 X2) with limited access to engine / hoses???

I just disconnect the intake hose and shove a garden hose in it. Start the engine then turn on the water full blast.
I hear the concerns that a garden hose can't put out enough water, but have never had a problem this way. Of course I've only run the engine 10-15min max to warm up the oil for an oil change or similar. I don't see the engine generating alot of heat without any load on it, even at brief higher rpm runs. He!!, I drove a SB Chevy truck to work and back for a week, 15-20min drive with no coolant in it. Didn't have time to fix it!

My '96 had a hose connection like Coz's, but with a quick disconnect for the hose. That worked well.

east tx skier
03-09-2011, 02:45 PM
Why the valve for the hose? Simply to hold the hose in place? Water intake hose just sucks the water from the bottom of the pail?

The valve looks like it is for the garden hose. That way, you don't have to get out of the boat to turn the supply on and off.

coz
03-09-2011, 02:58 PM
My '96 had a hose connection like Coz's, but with a quick disconnect for the hose. That worked well.

I keep the quick disconnect in the boat (glove box) and just pull the cap then screw it on for the hose.

Huskie05
03-09-2011, 03:35 PM
I believe my garden hose puts out enough water for the fake lake. I have bigger pipes for the hose and it throws s a ton of water. Are there any other concerns using the fake wake assuming its suctioned up properly to the bottom of the boat? I will be using the fake wake for a 2011 X55. I used this same set up for my last boat, never any issues.

I love this forum, its like having MasterCraft experts / Mechanics at my disposal.
Thanks guys.... By the way, my boat will be shipping on Friday. I cannot sleep, I am so darn excited I about pee myself everyday. :)

TRBenj
03-09-2011, 04:04 PM
In my case, I don't have the water pressure at the house to keep up with demands of the boat.
Doug, most people wont have the water pressure necessary to keep up with the RWP- especially at anything above an idle. So what!

The only things you need to worry about are 1)keeping the impeller lubricated and 2)keeping the engine cool. Even lackluster water pressure can do those 2 things. By tee'ing into the pick up line (as opposed to removing a hose and shoving the garden hose in), any deficiency of water that the RWP attempts to draw is simply replaced by air (via the intake grate). This makes it impossible to suck the garden hose flat and cut off your water supply entirely.

$15 in parts gives you a permanant solution, no extra parts necessary to run your boat out of water other than a water source (a hose). You dont have to worry about the hose coming out of the bucket, or the bucket tipping over on your carpet, or the plunger falling off the hull.

Simple and elegant!;)

Miss Rita
03-09-2011, 04:06 PM
My garden hose puts out quite a bit of water; I've got lots of pressure. I tried the bucket method last fall. With the engine at 650 rpm, the hose puts out more water than the engine takes in. At 900 rpm it's even, and at 1200 rpm there's no way the hose can provide enough water and the engine intake hose is sucking a lot of air.

hbomb
03-09-2011, 05:41 PM
I reckon this will goes towards the award for "stupid question" but......
I am a little confused???
what is the issue........
I take it that the issue when using a hose is NOT getting enough water up to the engine be it because water pressure is not sufficient and would not deliver enough water when engine being run under load......
using the bucket as mentioned, you can see how much water is being drawn....and as well as seeing how much is being drawn, allows for a greater flow??
I take it then that if water pressure is very good, there would be no issue with a set up such as the fitting that is plumbed into the system to allow for a hose to be hooked up........

my previous boat ran a mercruiser and we had a ball valve plumbed into the system to allow for direct hose conenction to the system - certainly water pressure was not an issue as flow was very good from the hose, as one would ensure it was at full open

coz
03-09-2011, 06:04 PM
I keep hearing about water pressure.....you don't want to go WOT on the hose bib and force the water in there, you want enough pressure to fill the lines so the impeller can do what it's designed to do......draw the water to the engine. I usually go 1/4 turn then fire it up quickly and when it's running I'll determine if it needs more by the flow from the exhaust.

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 06:09 PM
I reckon this will goes towards the award for "stupid question" but......
I am a little confused???
what is the issue........
I take it that the issue when using a hose is NOT getting enough water up to the engine be it because water pressure is not sufficient and would not deliver enough water when engine being run under load......
using the bucket as mentioned, you can see how much water is being drawn....and as well as seeing how much is being drawn, allows for a greater flow??
I take it then that if water pressure is very good, there would be no issue with a set up such as the fitting that is plumbed into the system to allow for a hose to be hooked up........

my previous boat ran a mercruiser and we had a ball valve plumbed into the system to allow for direct hose conenction to the system - certainly water pressure was not an issue as flow was very good from the hose, as one would ensure it was at full open

When I first got my MC, I bought the plunger with a hose fitting. When the plunger was wedged in place, there was enough water pressure that there was plenty of water overflowing and not even making it into the water intake. I felt confident that the engine was getting more than enough water. Then I tried the bucket method, and saw that the hose running full into the bucket could not keep up with the engine at 900 RPM. That tells me that when I was running with the plunger I was not getting enough water with the plunger. Been sold on the bucket ever since.

coz
03-09-2011, 06:19 PM
When I first got my MC, I bought the plunger with a hose fitting. When the plunger was wedged in place, there was enough water pressure that there was plenty of water overflowing and not even making it into the water intake. I felt confident that the engine was getting more than enough water. Then I tried the bucket method, and saw that the hose running full into the bucket could not keep up with the engine at 900 RPM. That tells me that when I was running with the plunger I was not getting enough water with the plunger. Been sold on the bucket ever since.

I personally would never be sold on having to drag a bucket full of water into the boat, unhook hoses every time and stick it in the bucket, and I'm not a fan of the fake-a-lake either but that's just my opinion and everyone has theirs.

TX.X-30 fan
03-09-2011, 06:22 PM
Won't it get hot if its not getting enough water?? I never had an issue with water hose on the intake with the flush thing.

coz
03-09-2011, 06:32 PM
Won't it get hot if its not getting enough water??

Easiest way to answer that question is........always watch this.

http://www.iowa80.com/DirectionsWEB/client/images/l170327.jpg

:D

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 06:32 PM
I personally would never be sold on having to drag a bucket full of water into the boat, unhook hoses every time and stick it in the bucket, and I'm not a fan of the fake-a-lake either but that's just my opinion and everyone has theirs.

That's why I have the valve on the bucket. I put it in empty and take it out empty. Plus it works great for winterizing. Hard to beat hooking up a hose to a fitting and firing it up of ease of use.

coz
03-09-2011, 06:37 PM
Hard to beat hooking up a hose to a fitting and firing it up of ease of use.

Ok.....next question how long does it take you and what kind of tools do you need? Takes me as long as it takes to screw a hose on and no tools required....wanna race? :D

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 07:08 PM
Ok.....next question how long does it take you and what kind of tools do you need? Takes me as long as it takes to screw a hose on and no tools required....wanna race? :D

Rather take the extra few minutes to have the peace of mind. Now, once we are on the water........perhaps a race would be in order. :D

east tx skier
03-09-2011, 07:33 PM
Doug, most people wont have the water pressure necessary to keep up with the RWP- especially at anything above an idle. So what!

The only things you need to worry about are 1)keeping the impeller lubricated and 2)keeping the engine cool. Even lackluster water pressure can do those 2 things. By tee'ing into the pick up line (as opposed to removing a hose and shoving the garden hose in), any deficiency of water that the RWP attempts to draw is simply replaced by air (via the intake grate). This makes it impossible to suck the garden hose flat and cut off your water supply entirely.

$15 in parts gives you a permanant solution, no extra parts necessary to run your boat out of water other than a water source (a hose). You dont have to worry about the hose coming out of the bucket, or the bucket tipping over on your carpet, or the plunger falling off the hull.

Simple and elegant!;)

I run my boat out of the water one day out of the year. I'll stick with the bucket. :)

At one point in time, someone probably thought those petcocks on the engine blocks were elegant solutions.


I'll take simple. Leave elegance for the ladies. 8p

/I'll grant you that it looks very nice and surely works fine.

TX.X-30 fan
03-09-2011, 07:38 PM
I'm glad you bucket-Boys weren't friends with Edison or Ford...............:D

east tx skier
03-09-2011, 07:38 PM
Ok.....next question how long does it take you and what kind of tools do you need? Takes me as long as it takes to screw a hose on and no tools required....wanna race? :D

The one time a year I do this, I'm not in much of a hurry.
1. Unscrew the hose clamp on the transmission cooler (lake side) pull hose (something I do to check the screen at winterization anyway).
2. Take the 3' of clear PVC hose out of the bucket and clamp it to the transmission cooler. Put the other end in the bucket.
3. Turn on hose. When bucket gets close to full, start engine.

With filling up the bucket, maybe 3 minutes.

I'll grant you the speed record.

east tx skier
03-09-2011, 07:39 PM
I'm glad you bucket-Boys weren't friends with Edison or Ford...............:D

Wow, early 1900s references. How old are you??? ;)

Remember, one of the mass produced items to accomplish this goal was designed to unclog toilets.

airdrew99
03-09-2011, 07:42 PM
Or you can do this and hook your hose right up to it and not worry about dragging a heavy bucket of water into the boat.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2799/4049429037_1ab6a328a3_z.jpg?zz=1

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2698/4050183094_4fa65abc48.jpg

I had a similar setup like this on my '91 Prostar 190. I had a buddy turn on the hose about 1-2 seconds before starting the engine. The engine ran for about 10 seconds then died. Before my buddy could shut off the water, one of the water hoses on the engine swelled up and split. I know that particular hose had an internal spring to prevent it from collapsing, but I don't think it was rated to withstand the 90psi water pressure coming out of the faucet. Just a warning for people with this setup.

Drew

TX.X-30 fan
03-09-2011, 07:45 PM
Wow, early 1900s references. How old are you??? ;)

Remember, one of the mass produced items to accomplish this goal was designed to unclog toilets.



That is great right there.....................8p

CantRepeat
03-09-2011, 07:47 PM
I did the hose in the hose trick for a long time, probably 6 out of the 14 years I owned the 92. I never saw and issue as the temp gauge never went crazy.

After using the bucket one time and seeing how much water the motor will draw at say 1500 RPM I'd never go back to the hose in a hose trick. I can only guess that the exhaust is getting over heated as well as some parts of the motor.

I'm not trying to sway you Coz, but seeing is believing. I even went as far as to get a bigger bucket because the boat just took in water faster then the hose/bucket could support.

http://www.mikesell.net/images/boat/bucket.jpg

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 07:49 PM
I did the hose in the hose trick for a long time, probably 6 out of the 14 years I owned the 92. I never saw and issue as the temp gauge never went crazy.

After using the bucket one time and seeing how much water the motor will draw at say 1500 RPM I'd never go back to the hose in a hose trick. I can only guess that the exhaust is getting over heated as well as some parts of the motor.

I'm not trying to sway you Coz, but seeing is believing. I even went as far as to get a bigger bucket because the boat just took in water faster then the hose/bucket could support.

http://www.mikesell.net/images/boat/bucket.jpg

Nice set-up, Tim. :cool:

TX.X-30 fan
03-09-2011, 07:50 PM
I had a similar setup like this on my '91 Prostar 190. I had a buddy turn on the hose about 1-2 seconds before starting the engine. The engine ran for about 10 seconds then died. Before my buddy could shut off the water, one of the water hoses on the engine swelled up and split. I know that particular hose had an internal spring to prevent it from collapsing, but I don't think it was rated to withstand the 90psi water pressure coming out of the faucet. Just a warning for people with this setup.

Drew





WOW at the hose bib you had 90psi?? Did you have some kind of reducer for the inside plumbing?? I have to use commercial hoses here because we get 50/60 from the street. Can you imagine the busted pipe damage after a long day at the lake.

TX.X-30 fan
03-09-2011, 07:50 PM
C-R that screams redneck...................

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 07:51 PM
WOW at the hose bib you had 90psi?? Did you have some kind of reducer for the inside plumbing?? I have to use commercial hoses here because we get 50/60 from the street. Can you imagine the busted pipe damage after a long day at the lake.

Yeah, but think how fast he can flush his toilet. :D

TX.X-30 fan
03-09-2011, 07:51 PM
Yeah, but think how fast he can flush his toilet. :D




Good point:D

east tx skier
03-09-2011, 07:54 PM
You know the evolution of this process is hooking a fake-a-lake up to the toilet line and supplying the water to the boat by flushing, right?

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 07:55 PM
You know the evolution of this process is hooking a fake-a-lake up to the toilet line and supplying the water to the boat by flushing, right?

:uglyhamme:uglyhamme:uglyhamme

CantRepeat
03-09-2011, 08:04 PM
C-R that screams redneck...................

Well I'm a So Cal boy and working the transplant action, but I do try! :D

I've order some 1 1/4 .95 wall stainless steel tubing that I'm going to bend on my bender and custom cut for the buck so I don't have to use an extension hose.

TX.X-30 fan
03-09-2011, 08:42 PM
Well I'm a So Cal boy and working the transplant action, but I do try! :D

I've order some 1 1/4 .95 wall stainless steel tubing that I'm going to bend on my bender and custom cut for the buck so I don't have to use an extension hose.




We need pics with the upgrade...........

coz
03-09-2011, 09:59 PM
Yeah, but think how fast he can flush his toilet. :D

Wow!.....we go from flushing engines to flushing toilets :D So what do you guys prefer?...Kohler, Crane, American Standard, Mansfield or Eljer? And what kind of flush kit do you use?
http://images.zaazu.com/img/scratch-head02-idea-animated-animation-smiley-emoticon-000415-large.gif

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 10:41 PM
Wow!.....we go from flushing engines to flushing toilets :D So what do you guys prefer?...Kohler, Crane, American Standard, Mansfield or Eljer? And what kind of flush kit do you use?
http://images.zaazu.com/img/scratch-head02-idea-animated-animation-smiley-emoticon-000415-large.gif

Things do have a way of going off on a tangent here, don't they?:confused:

coz
03-09-2011, 10:55 PM
Things do have a way of going off on a tangent here, don't they?:confused:

Well we sure as hell are the most all around knowledgeable boating forum in the world because of that....there ain't nothing we don't know or can't fix :D I just hope no one brings up the enema flush kits though :rolleyes:

thatsmrmastercraft
03-09-2011, 10:58 PM
Well we sure as hell are the most all around knowledgeable boating forum in the world because of that....there ain't nothing we don't know or can't fix :D I just hope no one brings up the enema flush kits though :rolleyes:

And here I thought a few stray impeller vanes were an issue to deal with. :rolleyes:

airdrew99
03-09-2011, 11:07 PM
WOW at the hose bib you had 90psi?? Did you have some kind of reducer for the inside plumbing?? I have to use commercial hoses here because we get 50/60 from the street. Can you imagine the busted pipe damage after a long day at the lake.

Yeah, that 90psi is at my parent's house. They live at an airpark that is really nice. It is about 5 minutes out of the city. I don't know how they have such great pressure, but we've put a gauge on it to take the measurement.

TRBenj
03-10-2011, 09:32 AM
I had a similar setup like this on my '91 Prostar 190. I had a buddy turn on the hose about 1-2 seconds before starting the engine. The engine ran for about 10 seconds then died. Before my buddy could shut off the water, one of the water hoses on the engine swelled up and split. I know that particular hose had an internal spring to prevent it from collapsing, but I don't think it was rated to withstand the 90psi water pressure coming out of the faucet. Just a warning for people with this setup.

Drew
Similar would be the key word here. The added ingredient that caused the problem in your friend's set up would be in the inline valve between the tee and hull pickup that he obviously had closed. Without that valve, any excess water pressure just dumps out the through hull.

Even with marginal water pressure, I can run well above idle with a simple tee- my temp gauge does not move off 155 and my last impeller lasted 5 years before I replaced it (and it had more life left in it when I did so). It takes 2 seconds to hook up, and requires no tools or even a bucket. I can run the boat at my cottage, at the house, or anywhere that has a hose... My boats stay in the water all summer, but this set up makes winterization and summerization a breeze. It also offers no other dangers that some of the other proposed set ups inherently have. Its always the first thing I add to a boat when I buy it... its $15 well spent for me.

I guess if one cant see the beauty in that, they cannot be convinced. To each his own.:)

east tx skier
03-10-2011, 10:18 AM
Similar would be the key word here. The added ingredient that caused the problem in your friend's set up would be in the inline valve between the tee and hull pickup that he obviously had closed. Without that valve, any excess water pressure just dumps out the through hull.

Even with marginal water pressure, I can run well above idle with a simple tee- my temp gauge does not move off 155 and my last impeller lasted 5 years before I replaced it (and it had more life left in it when I did so). It takes 2 seconds to hook up, and requires no tools or even a bucket. I can run the boat at my cottage, at the house, or anywhere that has a hose... My boats stay in the water all summer, but this set up makes winterization and summerization a breeze. It also offers no other dangers that some of the other proposed set ups inherently have. Its always the first thing I add to a boat when I buy it... its $15 well spent for me.

I guess if one cant see the beauty in that, they cannot be convinced. To each his own.:)

Tim, it is a fine option. Just be sure to remember to close the valve.

Do I understand that you have it setup so that it does not close of the intake line running to the hull, such that when the engine is not running, the water from the hose can escape through the seastrainer and out the thru-hull fitting?

I'm guessing you have those pictures hosted on flickr or photobucket since they don't show up on my work computer (blocked here for some unknown reason).

TRBenj
03-10-2011, 10:38 AM
Doug, thats correct on both accounts (photobucket). The valve is not in line with the water intake hose- it only turns the tee on and off. Turning the valve on and off is really the hardest part of the hookup. I forgot to close it once- but I got 3/4 of the way around the lake before I noticed my temp gauge climbing. Closed it, no harm, no foul.

If you forgot to re-connect your intake line after running off the bucket, I suspect you'd have bigger problems on your hands.;)

Unfortunately, no method is *completely* foolproof... but this is the closest Ive seen.

east tx skier
03-10-2011, 11:02 AM
Doug, thats correct on both accounts (photobucket). The valve is not in line with the water intake hose- it only turns the tee on and off. Turning the valve on and off is really the hardest part of the hookup. I forgot to close it once- but I got 3/4 of the way around the lake before I noticed my temp gauge climbing. Closed it, no harm, no foul.

If you forgot to re-connect your intake line after running off the bucket, I suspect you'd have bigger problems on your hands.;)

Unfortunately, no method is *completely* foolproof... but this is the closest Ive seen.

Got it. And no problem with it sucking too much air when running off the hose since there is an opening into the system that's not flushed with water?

In my case, I'm only running off the bucket when I winterize. That hose would be detached anyway, albeit momentarily, so that I could check for debris in the transmission cooler screen. Once I'm running the boat, the raw water hose goes back on and I pull a few other hoses to make sure I've got the water out of them. Drain the engine, plug everything back up, pour in antifreeze at the tstat housing, and call it a day as far as the cooling system is concerned.

TRBenj
03-10-2011, 11:10 AM
Nope, no problem at all. There is more than enough water to cool the engine and lube the impeller. No concerns beyond that.

Youre still pulling that hose and checking the screen? You know that fancy new boat of yours has a strainer thats supposed to catch debris, right?8p

east tx skier
03-10-2011, 11:22 AM
Nope, no problem at all. There is more than enough water to cool the engine and lube the impeller. No concerns beyond that.

You're still pulling that hose and checking the screen? You know that fancy new boat of yours has a strainer that's supposed to catch debris, right?8p

Yeah, but have you seen where I ski? Fair amount of crud in this water. My philosophy is leave no stone unturned.

CantRepeat
03-10-2011, 01:53 PM
We need pics with the upgrade...........

Die set and tubing are on the way. I might have to sell some upgrades to offset the die set. 304ss tubing is kind of pricy but it will be worth it.

oldairboater
03-11-2011, 09:25 PM
If you run your boat without enough water flow bad things can and will happen. The hose and fake lake would not work for me. I don't have the water volume. I will use the bucket method so I don't ever run my boat dry or short of cooling. Once or twice a year at the most. Otherwise the boats on the river. Your boats ----do what you want. I don't care.

03geetee
03-19-2011, 08:24 AM
Bought my new 5 gallon bucket, hose extension and valve. I did however make one additional modification which may or may not be necessary.

At my house I have two hose outlets very close to my driveway, one by the front door and one in my garage. The garage one is pretty trick as it is tied into my cold side only and runs through a huge water filter for spotless rinses everytime with no heavy metal in the water.

I bought a two into one valve with controls on both inlets. If the boat draws more then my single hose can put out all I have to do is open the other hose valve on the bucket and let more in. If the pressure is so greatly reduced because of both water supplies being connected I can always use my neighbors spiget.

Problem solved.

JTR

JohnE
03-19-2011, 09:23 AM
Mark this day down...I agree with Coz on this one.

When I bought my first mcx from Mike, he told me that a garden hose with even marginal pressure was adequate for running the mcx out of water. I've always just stuck the garden hose into the hose that connects to the through hull fitting, but I like Coz's T. I might go that route. I do have 80 psi. That's with a pressure reducer bc street pressure is 120.

Ben
03-19-2011, 09:41 AM
As another option, here is what I have been using for 8 yrs or so. I remove the intake from engine side of trans cooler and shove the white PVC piece into the intake hose and clamp on with same clamp. I run at idle and may burst rev to 2000 or so because it sounds cool. No problems so far, no bucket to mess with or worry about spilling. It is 3 pieces from Depot - PVC piece, brass male to male in the middle (the hardest to find part, converting NPT to garden hose thread, they have it, just need to stare around for a bit...) and female to female garden hose thingy.

Having said that, the permanent "T" thing looks pretty cool too and in theory would be better. Theory and reality are frequently different though.

Waiting for ice to melt so ski....

TRBenj
03-21-2011, 12:33 PM
I remove the intake from engine side of trans cooler and shove the white PVC piece into the intake hose and clamp on with same clamp.
Be careful- youre depriving the transmission of its ability to cool if you bypass the transmission cooler when running on the hose. Even though youre in neutral, the transmission is still spinning, and will heat up.

the permanent "T" thing looks pretty cool too and in theory would be better. Theory and reality are frequently different though.
Not in this case, though. ;)