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dirtk38
03-03-2011, 11:15 PM
I saw another recent thread about replacing manifolds, but I've got some issues of my own and didn't want to hijack the other thread...

I've got a 1998 205, and my manifolds seem to be rustier every time I look at them. Tonight I was working on removing the plastic drain plugs that had completely attached themselves to the iron, and I really started to notice how bad the rust is. Its so bad that I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be able to get the manifold bolts out without them crumbling. I bought the boat in August of last year, and didn't have any problems with engine performance, so I'd love to put the replacement off...but I'd sure hate to have a catastrophic failure while on the lake this summer. So is it pretty safe to say that its time to replace these things?

Also, looking around online at where to buy new manifolds, there seems to be a big price difference between the ones sold by skidim and the "exhaust replacement kit" sold by this company:
http://www.ebasicpower.com/pc/BPISBCIND/INDEXHKITS/Manifold,%20Exhaust%20Kit,%20Indmar,%20GM%20305%20 5.0L,%20350%205.7L%20V8.html

Obviously the parts are from two different manufacturers, but is there a reason I shouldn't save a lot of money and go with the kit?

And with my bolts being so rusty, would it be advisable to just take it to a dealership and let them deal with removing the old stuff? I'm mechanically inclined but not an expert mechanic by any means. I usually try to save the money and do stuff myself, but the thought of dealing with these rusty bolts makes me nauseous.

So...any advice?

thatsmrmastercraft
03-04-2011, 12:03 AM
I don't have any experience with the quality of either of the exhaust manifolds, but will watch this thread as I will be replacing my exhaust manifolds this year. As far as removing the rusty bolts, the best method would be to use an impact wrench starting at a low level of torque and working your way up. Much less likely to break anything that way. A new 6 point socket goes a long way to not rounding off bolt heads, as does wire brushing the bolt heads with a stainless steel brush before getting started. Good luck!

JLeuck64
03-04-2011, 12:15 AM
just leave em be...
The bolts that secure the manifolds to the heads are always going to be rusty. A lot of heat down in that area so even if you do replace them the new ones wont look shiny and new for very long. Now the riser gaskets might be another story, those very well could need replacement due to age and hours of operation. They would be an easy DIY project with the right tools

mayo93prostar
03-04-2011, 08:52 AM
I still have the original manifolds and risers on my 93 prostar and it has been run in brackish (salty) water all its life, but I do flush it well after each outing. I have had the manifolds off to replace gaskets and it is not a very hard job. I suggest you remove them to inspect them, clean up some, paint, new gaskets and new bolts. this way you know the condition of them and not risk a failure this summer.

Table Rocker
03-04-2011, 10:47 AM
I was wondering if anyone has had their manifolds coated. I would think being coated inside and out would put a stop to the corrosion, but I don't know what it would cost.

http://www.jet-hot.com/boats.html

matt
03-05-2011, 06:22 PM
I had started the other thread about when to replace manifolds. I had never thought about Jet-Hot. I have used their coatings in my roadracing days, and it was worth it. Give then a call and see what they say, and if you would post the answer.

matt
03-05-2011, 06:25 PM
On the rusty manifold bolts, try tapping then several times a day with a ballpeen hammer before you remove them. This usually seems to help free them up.

j.mccreight@hotmail.com
03-05-2011, 06:39 PM
Soak the manifold bolts in a rust penetrate for several hours then remove bolts with hand tools, do not use power tools to remove the bolts as they will strip out or break.

TEAL98
03-05-2011, 07:38 PM
I had an experience of my own with removing the plastic drain plugs on my '98 190. Had to use a T&D set to extract the plastic out, and put some sort of plumbing bolt in to the back of each one. I did such an excellent job, I forgot to put teflon tape/paste before installing the new ones and it still did NOT leak. Got pics to prove it:D

Anyways, another thing I'll add to the post above, is that it doesn't hurt to re-tighten while trying to work out rusty/corroded bolts. Be careful :)

east tx skier
03-05-2011, 08:06 PM
I'll join the "leave them be" camp and, at most, just say replace the riser gaskets. They all rust and new ones won't look new for long.

Table Rocker
03-05-2011, 09:24 PM
I had started the other thread about when to replace manifolds. I had never thought about Jet-Hot. I have used their coatings in my roadracing days, and it was worth it. Give then a call and see what they say, and if you would post the answer.I sent an e-mail for a quote. It came back $345 for the 1700F Extreme Silver and $450 for the 1600F Black, plus shipping. Not bad for internal and external protection.

rjracin240
03-06-2011, 10:42 AM
My manifolds developed a crack along the Mastercraft lettering and began to weep water, replaced manifolds with BARR replacements. Manifolds seemed to be of good quality and were sourced from JAM Enterprises from Lake Mary Fl (800 262-2929). Service was good and shipping was prompt.
Took lots of pictures during installation, but do not have them posted in my albums yet. Will try and work on this.
Couple of highlights, if you do intend on taking them off, START SOAKING THE HARDWARE EACHDAY NOW!!! I used a product called Kroll (dont have a can for the proper spelling) spraying it around the head of the bolts every day (dont be afraid to spray the hardware after running the motor while the hardware is warm.....not at the flashpoint of the chemical).
All of the bolts came off except for the token one. Used a name brand 6- point socket during removal (sometimes the Chinese harbor freight sockets are a little off in size), however since this bolt was right under the spot where the manifold was weepeing there was quite a bit of exfoliation and the head crumbled. Tried using a metric socket next size down which fit but once again the head crumbled, long story short tried 6 & 12 point sockets till it was well rounded off.
Next step was to get the 41/2" grinder out with sanding flapper wheel and sand head off bolt. (when doing this insure all area's where sparks will fly are well protected, hot sparks will embed into vinyl upholstery, gel coat, and plexiglass windows (sparks usually contain metal particles). PROTECT WELL.

Once head was off I was able to rotate manifold, bolt shank had also corroded and expanded and was seized in its bore which was to my advantage as it allowed me to turn manifold in the loosenig direction. More penetrating spray gentle persuasion tapping with a plastic dead blow mallet and some pry bar's being careful not to pry on manifold mating surfaces, it eventually came off. If you have these difficulties just go slow and be patient and carefull of what you are doing.

The riser bolts are hex heads on mine so I cut a hex wrench down and put the cut off part in the tight places where the riser curves back and used a dogbone TQ adapter. A regular box end wrench can also work here. ( take the front ones out first and then as yo loosen the back ones where the riser curves back alternate between right and left side or else you will jack the hex and wrench to jack right into the riser not allowing the bolt to be loosened completely.

Go slow and try and use the most conservative methods possible before breaking out cutting torches or grinders, one last thing if you cut the head of the bolt off you will still be left with the shank which you can put a vice grip on if you still need to twist it out.

When you reassemble insure you use antiseize in order to make removal easier next time.

Will try and get my step by step pictures posted in my album soon, hope this helps.

dirtk38
03-06-2011, 03:03 PM
Thanks for the replies everyone. I am about to head back over to the boat to see if I can removed the other plastic plug. I think I'll take the risers off so I can replace the gaskets and see if I can get a better idea of the condition of the inside of the manifolds. Anything specific I can look for?

I'll also try to get a few good pics so I can post them.

Willski
03-06-2011, 03:14 PM
I bought exhaust manifolds from JA Chamberlain about 5 years ago. Seemed to be okay quality. Cheaper than most places.

dirtk38
03-06-2011, 05:26 PM
I got the second plug out, but I can't get the new plugs that I ordered from Skidim to screw in. May have to do some work on the threads it looks like.

I pulled off one of the risers and took a few pics. I'm no expert, but it looks like the internals are ok...areas that are supposed to be black are black.

64846
^^ Signs of a leaking gasket? This can be seen on both headers.

64852
^^ Looking inside the riser.

64849
^^ Some flaking paint and rusting around the edges of the riser's mounting surface.

64850
^^Top surface of manifold. I assume I need to remove this old gasket before putting things back together?

64851
^^ Sorry, way out of focus. But you can see how rusty the area around the drain hole and bolts is.


I guess my biggest fear now is how to remove the old gasket so I can put on a new one. Tips? See anything bad that I should be aware of? If not, I'm thinking I'll just leave things how they are. Trying to get on the river next weekend!

JLeuck64
03-06-2011, 07:21 PM
Yup that plug has been leaking for a while hasn't it. I would clean it up with a PIPE THREAD TAP. Sorry I don't know the exact size off the top of my head but you should be able to match up the old plug to the correct sized tap. Has to be a pipe thread tap because it has a unique shape.

To clean off the old riser gasket you could start with a gasket scraper. Follow up with a piece of 180 grit wet dry sandpaper on a sanding block. I like to use wet/dry paper because you can spray WD-40 or similar on the sandpaper to help remove debris that would clog it up if you only used dry sandpaper. Once both gasket surfaces are clean you can install the new gasket dry or if there is some minor pitting I would not be afraid to brush some Aviation Form-A-Gasket on before reassembly. It's a liquid gasket sealer that helps fill those little voids created from the rust pitting. Don't use silicone...

matt
03-06-2011, 07:57 PM
I have been on this subject for a while, and I spoke with Richard I believe at Skidim. He suggested taking them to a radiator shop to clean up. I then called the owner of the radiator/alternator shop I use on a regular basis at work and trust. He told me that he could do the clean up, but all he would do is dip them in Muraic (?) acid from Lowes for several minutes then flush them with clean water. More of a do it yourself project. Has anyone tried this?

dirtk38
03-06-2011, 08:23 PM
I have been on this subject for a while, and I spoke with Richard I believe at Skidim. He suggested taking them to a radiator shop to clean up. I then called the owner of the radiator/alternator shop I use on a regular basis at work and trust. He told me that he could do the clean up, but all he would do is dip them in Muraic (?) acid from Lowes for several minutes then flush them with clean water. More of a do it yourself project. Has anyone tried this?

A buddy of mine recommended having the acid dip done as well. But obviously this involves getting the manifolds off the engine, which I hope to avoid if possible.

Yup that plug has been leaking for a while hasn't it. I would clean it up with a PIPE THREAD TAP. Sorry I don't know the exact size off the top of my head but you should be able to match up the old plug to the correct sized tap. Has to be a pipe thread tap because it has a unique shape.

To clean off the old riser gasket you could start with a gasket scraper. Follow up with a piece of 180 grit wet dry sandpaper on a sanding block. I like to use wet/dry paper because you can spray WD-40 or similar on the sandpaper to help remove debris that would clog it up if you only used dry sandpaper. Once both gasket surfaces are clean you can install the new gasket dry or if there is some minor pitting I would not be afraid to brush some Aviation Form-A-Gasket on before reassembly. It's a liquid gasket sealer that helps fill those little voids created from the rust pitting. Don't use silicone...

I had to destroy the old plastic plugs in order to get them out, but I may have saved a big enough chunk. Isn't it a 3/4" inch? I guess I have to know the thread pitch as well though. Also, do I need to remove the manifolds before I sand them, in order to prevent debris from falling into the engine?

Table Rocker
03-06-2011, 08:33 PM
I had to destroy the old plastic plugs in order to get them out, but I may have saved a big enough chunk. Isn't it a 3/4" inch? I guess I have to know the thread pitch as well though. 3/4" NPT (National Pipe Thread). Pipe threads are tapered so they bottom out with a water tight fit.

Brass 3/4" NPT plugs are available at your local hardware store.

JLeuck64
03-07-2011, 12:00 AM
Oops forgot to mention this. I stuff paper towels down the exhaust passage to catch any debris. Don't worry about the water jackets as much because they are harder to dig the paper out from. Besides if you are careful when removing the old gasket you should be able to keep large chunks from falling in.

mart_it
03-07-2011, 11:02 AM
Decided to work on getting the manifold's back to new over the weekend....so far everything is going good, I was surprised at the amount of scale that came out.

PICS:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v396/Mart_it/DSC_0483.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v396/Mart_it/DSC_0477.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v396/Mart_it/DSC_0486.jpg

This looks like like a challenge to remove...awaiting tips!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v396/Mart_it/DSC_0482.jpg

For those wondering how to remove old gasket residue I used a stiff wire cup brush and an angle grinder..works perfect.
Will be painting using Duplicolor high heat engine enamel and mating the exhaust surface to the block using ultra copper sealant.

thatsmrmastercraft
03-07-2011, 12:20 PM
Looking much better.

SDProstar
03-07-2011, 02:29 PM
I have been on this subject for a while, and I spoke with Richard I believe at Skidim. He suggested taking them to a radiator shop to clean up. I then called the owner of the radiator/alternator shop I use on a regular basis at work and trust. He told me that he could do the clean up, but all he would do is dip them in Muraic (?) acid from Lowes for several minutes then flush them with clean water. More of a do it yourself project. Has anyone tried this?

FWIW: I did this. Used muriatic acid / water mixture. Soaked each piece (4 - because I separated the risers from the manifolds) in a 5 gallon bucket overnight. This removed most, if not all, of the rust and scale from the insides. The acid also disolved the freeze plugs. I'm interested to see if anyone advises you to replace your freeze plugs...

Chris

psychobilly
03-07-2011, 02:34 PM
This looks like like a challenge to remove...awaiting tips!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v396/Mart_it/DSC_0482.jpg




Small pipe wrench should do the trick here.

mart_it
03-07-2011, 02:42 PM
Small pipe wrench should do the trick here.

I tried.....and stripped the nylon..look closely.

thatsmrmastercraft
03-07-2011, 02:44 PM
May have to heat it up a little. Make sure to have a replacement piece on hand.

Table Rocker
03-07-2011, 02:48 PM
I tried.....and stripped the nylon..look closely.You might be able to crush it and get it out. You won't be using it again anyway.

thatsmrmastercraft
03-07-2011, 04:19 PM
Perhaps a silly question, but did you try to put a wrench on it?

psychobilly
03-07-2011, 07:59 PM
If you say you tried the pipe wrench and it broke off then you may want to cut it off flush with the manifold and the try an easy out. If the easy out don't work and you say it's nylon, then I would burn it out and then chase the threads. With the NPT you will wanna cut a lil and then back it out to clean it out real good before making the next clean out cut. back and forth cleaning real good but don't get "country" on it or you could break the tap and then you're in trouble.... Take it easy and you'll do fine. Your local ACE hardware store should have the 3/4" NPT tap if you or one of your buddies don't have one. Check around, I bet one of your buddies has one... I have some in my tool box....

JLeuck64
03-07-2011, 10:08 PM
I tried.....and stripped the nylon..look closely.

Here's what I would do. Cut most of the old fitting away but not so much that it is flush with the manifold. Now grab a brand new hacksaw blade and use it to cut a relief into the fitting. Don't go crazy and cut into the threads on the manifold... just deep enough to cut through the fitting should do. Just a slot the thickness of a saw blade will give the fitting some room to collapse in on itself as you dig it out of the manifold. Usually one slot is enough but for some metal fittings it may require two slots. Clean it up with a tap when done and throw in a new fitting ( ;

thatsmrmastercraft
03-07-2011, 10:23 PM
I would go with a heat gun first. Shouldn't take too much to soften the nylon. No chance of inadvertently damaging the threads.

Table Rocker
03-08-2011, 10:43 AM
Another thing you might be able to do is drill a 1/4" hole through from side to side and turn it with a screwdriver.

JDK
03-08-2011, 03:02 PM
Here's what I would do. Cut most of the old fitting away but not so much that it is flush with the manifold. Now grab a brand new hacksaw blade and use it to cut a relief into the fitting. ( ;

Did exactly this with mine.
Grab the fitting corner right beside the relief cut with a pair of bfwpp (big friggen water pump pliers) and twist the fitting out. You'll be done in 2 minutes.

funk
03-08-2011, 03:04 PM
I have mine off right now and was wondering about the muriatic acid dip. The outer holes of the risers seem to have some resistance, they flow but not real well. Do you dilute the muriatic acid? How long in the bucket? How do you get rid of the used acid?

Thanks..

matt
03-08-2011, 08:47 PM
I haven't tried it yet, but according to my radiator guy he says dip them in stright muriatic acid. They should start smoking, thats OK. After 5-10 minutes remove them and flush well with the water hose. He told me they will start rusting if you do not paint them right then. I haven't thought of disposal, But it is organic and is used to clean concrete and swimming pools. I would research that a little further.

milkmania
03-09-2011, 12:22 AM
kinda inclined to think Muriatic Acid is not organic
http://www.ehow.com/about_6171360_muriatic-acid-used-for_.html

funk
03-09-2011, 12:10 PM
Yeah, I hear you milk.. that's why I asked. I have a pool and deal with that stuff, just wouldn't dump some rusty silt into the pool. Used manual labor and dremel tools, etc to try and get the outer riser ports cleaned up last night. Might try the acid tonight, leaning towards replacing the risers at a minimum at this point.

rjracin240
03-09-2011, 12:57 PM
Here is a link to a MSDS for Muriatic Acid, lot of CYOA under disposal. I know at my local dumping facility they have a amnesty area where you can leave chemicals such as Muriatic Acid, paint, etc, might give that a try.

http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Visual_Art/documents/Muriaticacid.pdf

psychobilly
03-11-2011, 08:49 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v396/Mart_it/DSC_0482.jpg

For those wondering how to remove old gasket residue I used a stiff wire cup brush and an angle grinder..works perfect.
Will be painting using Duplicolor high heat engine enamel and mating the exhaust surface to the block using ultra copper sealant.



Well........ did ya get it out????

mart_it
03-14-2011, 11:22 AM
Well........ did ya get it out????

Yup!

Follow these couple steps if you want to remove them effortlessly.

Step1: using a chisel and small hammer, cut the fitting flush with the manifold's so that the only part remaining is the threaded fitting inside.

Step2: using a thin metal saw blade, cut a groove in the fitting deep enough as to barely touch the threaded part of the manifold's.

Step3: using the chisel and hammer,delicately remove the nylon fitting by tapping lightely on the broken plastic and everything should break away nicely.

Step4: using a 3/4 npt tap, re-tap the hole and things are done!

dirtk38
03-14-2011, 03:03 PM
Yup!

Follow these couple steps if you want to remove them effortlessly.

Step1: using a chisel and small hammer, cut the fitting flush with the manifold's so that the only part remaining is the threaded fitting inside.

Step2: using a thin metal saw blade, cut a groove in the fitting deep enough as to barely touch the threaded part of the manifold's.

Step3: using the chisel and hammer,delicately remove the nylon fitting by tapping lightely on the broken plastic and everything should break away nicely.

Step4: using a 3/4 npt tap, re-tap the hole and things are done!

This is pretty much how I got my old plastic drain plugs out. Took some time but once you got enough of the middle of the plugs removed, they collapsed and you could pull the remaining pieces out.

I got both of my risers back on after sanding down the mating surfaces and putting on a new gasket. Got everything back together, cranked it up for the first time since winterization, and noticed that my Flush-Pro had cracked over the winter. The only people in town that stock those are my local MC dealer, but their parts guy "doesn't work on Saturdays" so they "couldn't help me until Monday," even after I explained that my brother was flying in from out of town to go out on the river on Saturday. This was my first experience with those guys, and it may be my only one. So, I got a piece of hose from the auto parts store and rigged something that would work for the day.

All that to say, boat ran great! Hoping to get lake ouachita this weekend and getting this season started. Thanks for everyone's help!

mart_it
03-16-2011, 11:13 AM
OK guys, need some info here. I bought some muriatic acid this morning and i'm about to dip the parts in the bucket for 10-15min.
Should I be worried about the freeze plugs being damaged?
Waiting for your thoughts, thanks!

SDProstar
03-16-2011, 04:47 PM
OK guys, need some info here. I bought some muriatic acid this morning and i'm about to dip the parts in the bucket for 10-15min.
Should I be worried about the freeze plugs being damaged?
Waiting for your thoughts, thanks!

IMHO my freeze plugs would have been fine if I stopped the soak at 10-15 minutes.

This is what not to do : I soaked my manifolds and risers overnight and the acid disolved the centers of the brass freeze plugs. There's a total of 6 freeze plugs I have to replace now. 1 in each riser and 2 in each manifold. They are just about 7/8" in diameter. I'll try NAPA or (?)

The acid did a great job on the rust, though, and they seem to flow better now. At least through a garden hose.

Chris

JLeuck64
03-16-2011, 04:56 PM
OK guys, need some info here. I bought some muriatic acid this morning and i'm about to dip the parts in the bucket for 10-15min.
Should I be worried about the freeze plugs being damaged?
Waiting for your thoughts, thanks!

With my luck... If I left em alone it would come back to bite me (they would probably start leaking after I got every thing back together).

I really like to reuse parts as much as possible and am not afraid to go the extra mile to recondition something to save a few bucks. But, at times we all have to balance the time to clean up and recondition those parts versus the cost of replacing it with new ones.

mart_it
03-16-2011, 11:51 PM
Just wanted to update on the muriatic acid dipping.

I bought a gallon of acid at my local hardware store today, pretty cheap (10$). After gathering a plastic recipient big enough for 1 manifold I proceded to cap both plug end's.
I opted to plug both end's and pour acid in the jacket's rather than dip in a full bucket of acid, but either way work's well.
15minutes of dipping......hose off with hot water.....fill jacket's with acid again and soak for 10minutes. Rince off with hot water again...Voila!
Came back looking as good as new.

oops forgot..ratio was 50|50

FWIW: Don't do this in your kitchen or house by any means.
I was in a well ventilated area with an industrial fan sucking the fumes out and my nose was tingling, so go figure. If this stuff can make the manifold's smoke, imagine what it does to your lungs when inhaled.

Dan K
03-17-2011, 12:52 PM
After you have them cleaned Powder coat them. i had mine blasted and powdercoated, they do not rust anymore and look great after doing it two years ago. Be carefull to mask the areas that have gaskets and freezeplugs becuase once on the powdercoating is difficult to remove for a clean mating surface.

G-Star
03-17-2011, 01:16 PM
IMHO my freeze plugs would have been fine if I stopped the soak at 10-15 minutes.

This is what not to do : I soaked my manifolds and risers overnight and the acid disolved the centers of the brass freeze plugs. There's a total of 6 freeze plugs I have to replace now. 1 in each riser and 2 in each manifold. They are just about 7/8" in diameter. I'll try NAPA or (?)

The acid did a great job on the rust, though, and they seem to flow better now. At least through a garden hose.

Chris

If all else fails... http://www.bakesonline.com/detail.aspx?ID=2314
But I doubt you'll have trouble finding them any number of other places.

psychobilly
03-17-2011, 06:15 PM
Just wanted to update on the muriatic acid dipping.

I bought a gallon of acid at my local hardware store today, pretty cheap (10$). After gathering a plastic recipient big enough for 1 manifold I proceded to cap both plug end's.
I opted to plug both end's and pour acid in the jacket's rather than dip in a full bucket of acid, but either way work's well.
15minutes of dipping......hose off with hot water.....fill jacket's with acid again and soak for 10minutes. Rince off with hot water again...Voila!
Came back looking as good as new.

oops forgot..ratio was 50|50

FWIW: Don't do this in your kitchen or house by any means.
I was in a well ventilated area with an industrial fan sucking the fumes out and my nose was tingling, so go figure. If this stuff can make the manifold's smoke, imagine what it does to your lungs when inhaled.

any pics of this???

matt
03-17-2011, 10:19 PM
I finally did mine today. I tapped the manifolds and risers with a ballpeen and loosened a good bit of rust up. I then soaked the risers in 5 gallon buckets with a 50/50 mixture for about 15 minutes each. A good bit of rust came out, then I rinsed them for a good while with the garden hose. They looked good, but I might soak them again Saturday when I do the manifolds. I will post some pictures when I get done.

matt
03-20-2011, 05:13 PM
I did the risers again for 20 minutes in a bucket mixed 50/50 and they look great. I did what Mart It did with the manifolds. I plugged both ends, stood them up back to back and filled them with a 50/50 mixture also through a small funnel. I let them sit 30 minutes, them rinsed them well and soaked the again for 30 minutes. they look great, this may become an annual thing for me. They are outside right now whit the paint drying. Hope to get them back on this evening.

mart_it
03-21-2011, 11:18 AM
Good job Matt!
I'll probably open them up every 2 years even though i'm pretty sure they will be clean.
Our lake has some of the cleanest water in the region, many owners have their water supply tapped directly to the lake so i'm guessing the manifold's should be clean enough.

BTW Matt, what are you using to seal between the manifold's and the block?
I know Skidim sell's the exhaust gasket but when I went to my local MC dealer they told me to just use some high temp ultra copper silicone. Just wondering what others are using.

matt
03-21-2011, 08:47 PM
I am using the Fel-pro aluminized gasket. I am out of town, but when I get home I will post the part number. I have never had on fail on the boat or on a hot rod engine.

thatsmrmastercraft
03-21-2011, 10:48 PM
When done properly, the copper silicone will make a fine gasket, however, its just too easy to end up with a leak. Good gaskets don't cost that much and I always go that route.

mayo93prostar
03-21-2011, 11:05 PM
I replaced my gaskets a couple years ago and used the ones from skidim both on the block and the riser surface. I wish I had put some sealant on the riser gaskets because they have leaked and left water/rust marks on the manifold and the side of the engine so I plan to redo them this spring with new gaskets and sealant. Already got the gaskets, just need the time.

I was told not to put any sealant on the gasket between the manifold and the block because it got too hot. Is this true?

Table Rocker
03-22-2011, 12:50 AM
I was told not to put any sealant on the gasket between the manifold and the block because it got too hot. Is this true?Not only is it hot, but there is no need. This is not a high pressure location. The only pressure is the backpressure from your exhaust, which is not much.

Plenty (if not most) engines ship from the factory without gaskets between the manifold and the block. Of course they are dealing with new parts that are machined and should fit well. After hundreds of heating and cooling cycles on our engines, the exhaust manifolds may be trying to warp. A gasket will more than make up for any warpage. Most likely you could take your manifolds to a machine shop to have them faced and you could install them without gaskets.

wakescene
03-24-2011, 04:58 PM
Not trying to scare anyone...but this is what 6 years of saltwater use, with religious flushing after every use does to the Manifolds and risers.

These units are shot and new ones are on the way. I was warned when I purchased the boat that in saltwater you will only get about 5 years out of the manifolds and risers, I got 6 out of these. This will be the 2nd new set I have purchased for the boat. This thread was the sole reason I checked this 2 weeks ago, "just to make sure that all was well". I'm glad I did.

The problem is that on both the riser and the manifolds, the amount of surface area between the exhaust and cooling jacket has been eaten away from the scaling. Additionally the cooling jackets were nearly plugged solid. I also found that I was starting to get some light weeping into the exhaust side on both manifolds, due to the reduction in material from the scaling.

Although expensive, this is a VERY easy fix. I am going to start checking this every year, especially for the weeping. Gaskets for the risers are $4/each and probably about an hours' work. simple in my eyes. I have additional pics if anyone wants to throw-up. LOL

JLeuck64
03-24-2011, 09:14 PM
Ya those did get scale and rust build up didn't they!

I guess that's why HiTek Marine found a niche they could market too. Dang purdy if I say so myself, but probably spendy...:(

But if they last longer than cast iron then maybe it's worth it in the long run???

SDProstar
03-24-2011, 11:57 PM
For you folks going with the muriatic acid flush route, I did find replacement freeze plugs at NAPA.

NAPA part number 381-9011. Out the door w/ a set of six for $9.72, including 7.75% California sales tax. (Jerry Brown needs it, you know…)

Cheers

funk
03-25-2011, 12:30 PM
Not trying to scare anyone...but this is what 6 years of saltwater use, with religious flushing after every use does to the Manifolds and risers.

These units are shot and new ones are on the way. I was warned when I purchased the boat that in saltwater you will only get about 5 years out of the manifolds and risers, I got 6 out of these. This will be the 2nd new set I have purchased for the boat. This thread was the sole reason I checked this 2 weeks ago, "just to make sure that all was well". I'm glad I did.

The problem is that on both the riser and the manifolds, the amount of surface area between the exhaust and cooling jacket has been eaten away from the scaling. Additionally the cooling jackets were nearly plugged solid. I also found that I was starting to get some light weeping into the exhaust side on both manifolds, due to the reduction in material from the scaling.

Although expensive, this is a VERY easy fix. I am going to start checking this every year, especially for the weeping. Gaskets for the risers are $4/each and probably about an hours' work. simple in my eyes. I have additional pics if anyone wants to throw-up. LOL

After removing mine and looking within, I too found the same condition. I have about 250 hours on the motor and have owned it 6 years. I assume since they were aftermarket that they were replaced when the motor was rebuilt. We replaced with all new risers and manifolds. The exhaust hoses were too bubbled up on the inside so the heat was beginning to rise. Good thing we checked this out. Cleaned up the valve covers and repainted too due to exterior corrosion. Salt Water sucks!! but in socal we want to be on the water and the 4hr drive to the river isn't always an option.

wakescene
03-28-2011, 04:17 PM
JLeuck64 - Nice find, and yes they have found a nice niche. I personally I like the fact that I have to dig into things from time to time. It keeps me aware of other issues that could be forming. Granted it's a lot more work, and it will cost some extra $$ over time for the parts replacements, but this hardcore maintenance I have been doing has saved me a ton of $$ by catching problems well before they get out of hand.

I wish I could sit with some of the MC engineers and discus the Saltwater issues that surrounds our boats. I have never really felt (even with the SS series) that any of the manufacturers are really getting the whole story from the dealers. Because my dealer was so poor in the first two years of ownership, I ran into problems immediately. After that, I went about it on my own. It's been a lot of work, but I save $$ and aggravation in the long run. Plus I have the satisfaction of knowing the boat cold, and can literally fix anything that happens.

Perhaps I should begin to create a list of items I would change and see how it compares to the SS Series to see where we match....

mikeg205
12-07-2011, 11:08 PM
I'll join the "leave them be" camp and, at most, just say replace the riser gaskets. They all rust and new ones won't look new for long.

Hate to revive a thread... but I just had to...

thanks east tx skier...as much as I would like to flush mine... the thought of pulling the manifolds or running acid thru the water jacket freaks me out... I have good flow and will clean up the connection. I think I will just chase it with a brass brush and flush water to the loose scaling off. most of the big scaling seems to be at the joint where the gasket goes...$1000 for all new manifolds and risers...so I will wait... luv the stainless...but that has to be big big bucks...

east tx skier
12-08-2011, 11:20 AM
Good call. Those look practically new.

Always leave the engine box raised a few inches when you're not using the boat. Air circulating under the box is helpful. They'll still rust, but moisture and heat can't thrive quite so well.

americanskierJim
12-08-2011, 08:06 PM
Ya those did get scale and rust build up didn't they!

I guess that's why HiTek Marine found a niche they could market too. Dang purdy if I say so myself, but probably spendy...:(

But if they last longer than cast iron then maybe it's worth it in the long run???

I am going to have to get me a pair of these for sure.