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View Full Version : Need help on wakeboard purchase


rjracin240
01-18-2011, 10:45 PM
Have a neighbor selling a CWB Transcend 142 wakeboard that looks in great shape having no chips or any obvious coosmetic damage for $100. Board is a couple years old, dooes this sound like a fair price

Secondly I need to buy bindings for it since it does not come with any, so booard will be primarily for my son who only last summer learned to ski. He is 14 about 5'10 and about 175lbs with a size 12-13 foot. I also hoope to use the board to learn on. I am 6'2" about 220lbs with size 12-13 foot.

Any recommendations on bindings and source of supply would be greatly appreciated.

cbryan70
01-18-2011, 11:14 PM
that board MIGHT be a bit large for your sun but at 14 he is only going to get bigger. I have a state 140 that worked well WHEN i was 220 to about 230ish but now ive outgrown that sadly hopfully but this summer ill be back at that weight. i would check what you want to drop on bindings first and see whats available. packages are the best deal IMO

nmcjr
01-18-2011, 11:14 PM
I'd say $100 is a fair price for most 2yo used boards-I don't really know the CWB line very well so can't tell you anythng about it really. Ideally you'd want to ride it a bit first to make sure it is a good fit, but this may be hard to determine if just learning. Only one thing to look out for is that wakeboard manufacturers changed the bolt patterns from 07-09 or so. You can still use newer bindings on an older board, but it requires adapters (that Ronix comes with) but you lose some stance options and its a bit more of a hassle, but not a huge issue. I think by '09 everyone had switched to 6" spacing. Personally I'd want a board with 6" spacing, but its not a show stopper.

I'd buy good bindings because comfortable bindings are a must and they'll last you for quite a while so its worth it to spend a little extra on bindings. My favorites by a mile are Ronix. I use only closed toe since they are warmer and I like the feel better. I have Relik's but have also had One's. Both are good. I usually buy from my local MC dealer or evogear.

vision
01-18-2011, 11:37 PM
Good price. I second the recommendation for a good comfortable binding. The most critical part of your hardware.

milkmania
01-18-2011, 11:55 PM
what about a hyperlite 137 for a 6'1" 145 pound kid?

nmcjr
01-19-2011, 12:18 AM
That's a bit of a tough one. Its correct for weight but small for height, meaning that even using the furthest out holes will probably be too narrow for him. Also he is likely growing so will probably outgrow it soon. I think I'd go more in the 140 range. In my opinion its better to go on the larger size when in between because there isn't much downside to a larger board within reason.

rjracin240
01-19-2011, 09:04 AM
I'd say $100 is a fair price for most 2yo used boards-I don't really know the CWB line very well so can't tell you anythng about it really. Ideally you'd want to ride it a bit first to make sure it is a good fit, but this may be hard to determine if just learning. Only one thing to look out for is that wakeboard manufacturers changed the bolt patterns from 07-09 or so. You can still use newer bindings on an older board, but it requires adapters (that Ronix comes with) but you lose some stance options and its a bit more of a hassle, but not a huge issue. I think by '09 everyone had switched to 6" spacing. Personally I'd want a board with 6" spacing, but its not a show stopper.

I'd buy good bindings because comfortable bindings are a must and they'll last you for quite a while so its worth it to spend a little extra on bindings. My favorites by a mile are Ronix. I use only closed toe since they are warmer and I like the feel better. I have Relik's but have also had One's. Both are good. I usually buy from my local MC dealer or evogear.

Thanks for the tips, didnt even know that the stance spacing was a consideration. Now realize the importance of the length of the board.

aaron.
01-19-2011, 09:09 AM
I'd say $100 is a fair price for most 2yo used boards-I don't really know the CWB line very well so can't tell you anythng about it really. Ideally you'd want to ride it a bit first to make sure it is a good fit, but this may be hard to determine if just learning. Only one thing to look out for is that wakeboard manufacturers changed the bolt patterns from 07-09 or so. You can still use newer bindings on an older board, but it requires adapters (that Ronix comes with) but you lose some stance options and its a bit more of a hassle, but not a huge issue. I think by '09 everyone had switched to 6" spacing. Personally I'd want a board with 6" spacing, but its not a show stopper.

I'd buy good bindings because comfortable bindings are a must and they'll last you for quite a while so its worth it to spend a little extra on bindings. My favorites by a mile are Ronix. I use only closed toe since they are warmer and I like the feel better. I have Relik's but have also had One's. Both are good. I usually buy from my local MC dealer or evogear.

^^^i agree with all of this... definitely measure the insert spread before you purchase binders. :cool:

BNIROOSTER
01-19-2011, 04:03 PM
Have a neighbor selling a CWB Transcend 142 wakeboard that looks in great shape having no chips or any obvious coosmetic damage for $100. Board is a couple years old, dooes this sound like a fair price

Secondly I need to buy bindings for it since it does not come with any, so booard will be primarily for my son who only last summer learned to ski. He is 14 about 5'10 and about 175lbs with a size 12-13 foot. I also hoope to use the board to learn on. I am 6'2" about 220lbs with size 12-13 foot.

Any recommendations on bindings and source of supply would be greatly appreciated.

I agree, the price sounds fair. If you look on EBAY there are some great vendors on there and deals on new boots are excellent. I would find what you like locally and then look on ebay for a better deal.

BMcD
01-19-2011, 10:42 PM
Quick tips from a guy who just started riding hard about 18mos ago:

Me: 35 years old, 6'1" and just over 200 pounds

I Started with a Liquid Force "Omega". It had a continuous rocker, so was very forgiving, not too poppy, and compared to the board I have now, heavy as a Mac truck. My boots were open toed and did the job nicely.

Enter a new world. I decided after really getting the hang of riding that I wanted something more aggressive and agile in the water (transferring 20+ years of snowboarding). I stepped up to the Ronix One (137) board and boots - it is a different sport all based on the setup. If you want to be able to progress in the sport (you and your son), buy something that is a little more advanced then you are. With a significantly lighter board, a real 3-stage rocker, and closed toe boots you will notice an amazing amount of control, speed, pop, and agility. I took my riding from barely being able to clear the wake to pulling inverts in the first year. Again, I'm 35, 6'1, and over 200lbs - the right gear really helps my way-post-teen body and the 50+ lbs I have on the guys I ride with keep from simply being an embarassment.

My advice - buy a cheap board to make sure you love the sport, then step up and buy something that is going allow you to advance. The guys at Grizzly Sports (http://http://www.grizzly-sports.com/store?tag=Wake/Boards) in Washington state are great and have excellent deals (will ship around the country).

If you want to see some of our crew and progression in riding from a year ago to now, check out the vids here (http://http://www.liveday1.com/video/work-it-out) or here (http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0fmxoc7tRc).

Hope this helped :)


Live Each Day as Though it is Your First. Live Day1 (http://www.liveday1.com).

milkmania
01-20-2011, 02:44 AM
Quick tips from a guy who just started riding hard about 18mos ago:

Me: 35 years old, 6'1" and just over 200 pounds

I Started with a Liquid Force "Omega". It had a continuous rocker, so was very forgiving, not too poppy, and compared to the board I have now, heavy as a Mac truck. My boots were open toed and did the job nicely.

Enter a new world. I decided after really getting the hang of riding that I wanted something more aggressive and agile in the water (transferring 20+ years of snowboarding). I stepped up to the Ronix One (137) board and boots - it is a different sport all based on the setup. If you want to be able to progress in the sport (you and your son), buy something that is a little more advanced then you are. With a significantly lighter board, a real 3-stage rocker, and closed toe boots you will notice an amazing amount of control, speed, pop, and agility. I took my riding from barely being able to clear the wake to pulling inverts in the first year. Again, I'm 35, 6'1, and over 200lbs - the right gear really helps my way-post-teen body and the 50+ lbs I have on the guys I ride with keep from simply being an embarassment.

My advice - buy a cheap board to make sure you love the sport, then step up and buy something that is going allow you to advance. The guys at Grizzly Sports (http://http://www.grizzly-sports.com/store?tag=Wake/Boards) in Washington state are great and have excellent deals (will ship around the country).

If you want to see some of our crew and progression in riding from a year ago to now, check out the vids here (http://http://www.liveday1.com/video/work-it-out) or here (http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0fmxoc7tRc).

Hope this helped :)




something like these?:confused:

rjracin240
01-20-2011, 07:41 AM
Quick tips from a guy who just started riding hard about 18mos ago:

Me: 35 years old, 6'1" and just over 200 pounds

I Started with a Liquid Force "Omega". It had a continuous rocker, so was very forgiving, not too poppy, and compared to the board I have now, heavy as a Mac truck. My boots were open toed and did the job nicely.

Enter a new world. I decided after really getting the hang of riding that I wanted something more aggressive and agile in the water (transferring 20+ years of snowboarding). I stepped up to the Ronix One (137) board and boots - it is a different sport all based on the setup. If you want to be able to progress in the sport (you and your son), buy something that is a little more advanced then you are. With a significantly lighter board, a real 3-stage rocker, and closed toe boots you will notice an amazing amount of control, speed, pop, and agility. I took my riding from barely being able to clear the wake to pulling inverts in the first year. Again, I'm 35, 6'1, and over 200lbs - the right gear really helps my way-post-teen body and the 50+ lbs I have on the guys I ride with keep from simply being an embarassment.

My advice - buy a cheap board to make sure you love the sport, then step up and buy something that is going allow you to advance. The guys at Grizzly Sports (http://http://www.grizzly-sports.com/store?tag=Wake/Boards) in Washington state are great and have excellent deals (will ship around the country).

If you want to see some of our crew and progression in riding from a year ago to now, check out the vids here (http://http://www.liveday1.com/video/work-it-out) or here (http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0fmxoc7tRc).

Hope this helped :)


Live Each Day as Though it is Your First. Live Day1 (http://www.liveday1.com).


Thanks for the great advice, exactly what I am looking for.
When you say poppy guess this means the flex in the board and the ability to use the board to jump and the reaction of the board to transitting across the wake and "popping" up over the wake instead of cutting through it?

When talking about "Rocker" would this be a curl or some sort of chine running along the outer edge of the board? When you say three stage rocker would that be a progression of curl/chines running from the inner part of the board to the outer edge?
Would the rocker/rockers give you bite to cut/turn?

My son and daughter live in Puerto Rico so come out for the summer to visit, wanting to insure they get boards that enable themselves to pick up the sport fairly quickly but not a board that would be so challenging that they get discouraged and they go home with a bad experience.

Thanks you guys for your patience and help for this newbie to become more educated in this sport.

TXMC-06X2
01-20-2011, 09:19 AM
Board sounds like a good deal, so my only advice would be about the bindings. Since you guys have about the same size foot I would definitely get bindings that are sized rather than the ones that say...fits sizes 8 to 12. From personal experience these kill your feet, especially if your on the high side of the spectrum. I would take your son down to the boardshop and have both of you find/agree on the same pair of bindings that will be comfortable for both. Nothing ends a session quicker than aching feet!!

vision
01-20-2011, 10:28 AM
Many aspects of a board affect how it rides. The main issues are degree of rocker (bend), shape of the rocker (continuous curve or flatter in the center which is termed 3-stage), shape of the bottom and fins (affect how loose the board will feel in the water), weight, and degree of flex.

It is all personal preference. I learned on a 3 stage rocker but now ride a continuous. In general, boards with more bottom features (fins), and continuous versus 3-stage rockers are easier to ride and more predictable.

The general trade offs are:

Continuous rocker boards are more forgiving and tend to be faster.
Three stage rockers give more upward pop when you hit the wake, but it is more abrupt and usually less forgiving on the timing of the pop. They are generally slower boards.
Less bottom features often means a faster board and a looser board which can be difficult when learning but often preferred by advance riders and give more of a surfing feel. A deep spine in the center of the board often makes it land softer by breaking the surface easier. SOme folks feel a board with more flex is often softer on landings as well.

BMcD
01-20-2011, 06:56 PM
Those boards look suitable. Whatever you buy, take a good look and make sure it hasn't been to badly beat up. Believe it or not, these things are kind of fragile. Deep nicks or dings can effect performance. I agree with the tip on buying a fitted boot - you don't want to be slopping around and you don't want to be stuffed in. The more comfortable and in control you feel, the more fun you will have.

A couple more personal opinions: After getting about 20 newbies a season up for their first time, I strongly recommend renting or borrowing a board with a continuous rocker (side profile does not sharply rise at tip and tail), then demo other boards to get a feel for style. Most people start out on my Liquid Force Omega - smooth ride, doesn't throw them in the air over the wake like a 3 stage rocker, has a center fin on each end to allow for good tracking, but less abilty to carve on your edge - the board slides more in the turn.

Within one or two rides once the newbie gets up, especially if they have any board sport experience, they want to ride the more advanced board (Ronix (http://http://www.ronixwake.com/default_mens.aspx#)One). It has outer fins on the tip and tail that really allow you to carve like you would coming down a hill on a snowboard. It also has the 3 stage rocker for those that want to get more "pop" or air when jumping the wake.

Good site for terminology definition, click here (http://http://www.wakeboarder.com/tricks/glossary.phtml).

Hopefully this helps. I give a thumbs up to the inexpensive first step with boots that feel good, then move on by demoing new/different gear.


Live Each Day as Though it is Your First. Live Day1 (http://www.liveday1.com)