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View Full Version : Help! Need advice: Hull filled with water and now frozen solid


DavidMCX30
01-03-2011, 11:38 AM
Had a nasty New Year's Day surprise in Indianapolis. Went to pick up my 2002 MC X-30 from the marina after having it winterized, acid wash, etc. I bought the boat this past spring so am somewhat new to boat ownership. The marina had held on to the boat after winterizing and repairs while getting an estimate for some minor gel coat fixes. When I got to the marina, everything seemed fine, except I was surprised to see the back plug still in. Canvas was tightly secured. I removed canvas for travel and everything looked OK. Towed my boat home only to do some work on it and notice some water on the carpet when I arrived. We have had a long stretch of below-freezing temperatures, but it warmed up for several days. I opened the ski locker and was stunned to find it completely filled with solid ice that had only just begun to melt. I then opened the circular cover that gives access to the plug in the middle of the hull. Another solid block of ice up to the top. Opened the engine and storage compartments to also find water/ice. I nearly puked.

The good news is that I called the marina and the head mechanic immediately apologized and said the plugs never should have been left in. He’s a good guy and former MC dealership owner, and the best I’ve found in the Indy area. He is going to pick the boat up tomorrow and take it to his shop to thaw out and see if there was any damage. I’m scared there may be visible damage, but am also worried that this could cause problems for years to come if the expanding ice put pressure on hoses, values, engine parts, etc.

I first took photos of everything for insurance purposes and, heaven forbid, if we would have to go down a legal route. With temperatures dropping back below freezing, I removed the back drain plug and emptied more than 50 gallons of water, measured in a bucket that I emptied multiple times. And that is just a small fraction of the total volume of water/ice in the boat. A drop in the bucket, so to speak.

So two questions for the kind experts here:
1) What kind of damage should we look for? What type of immediate damage could we find? And what potential damage could occur later on that we wouldn’t know about until something breaks?

2) What could have allowed THAT much water into my boat in the first place? After talking with the mechanic, he said the boat had been outside while we waited on the gel coat estimate (I thought it had been inside the entire time). We did have some heavy rain and a lot of snow over this period. He told me he had brushed the snow off a couple of times. Canvas seems fine and I just had it repaired over the summer. Never have had any issue before with water getting in.

And the shame of it is that I paid for indoor storage at another location, but hadn’t moved the boat yet due to ongoing repairs. Any advice and prayers are greatly appreciated!

east tx skier
01-03-2011, 12:07 PM
I'm so sorry to read this. As for how it got in there, sunbrella canvas is water resistant if regularly treated with something like 303 Fabric Guard, but still breathable. If it has not been regularly treated, it will lose its water resistance. So if the cover was tented, but not treated, it might still leak. If treated, but not tented, it will definitely leak. I'm not sure how they had it set up, but one way or the other, the water came through the cover and that is not uncommon. The real issue is, obviously, that the plugs were not pulled.

If the boat was winterized, the block should be fine. It's the electrical stuff, starter, etc., that will be toast from something like this. I'd also be concerned about the expansion of the freezing water in a confined space stressing the glass and other structures under the deck.

Take a look at your insurance policy to see what your deadlines are for reporting a claim. They may be able to fix the engine and its components, but the structural problems may be latent and I wouldn't want to rely on a marina to warrant them into the future.

DooSPX
01-03-2011, 12:14 PM
So truly sorry to hear this...
I hope your mechanic at the marina is as good about taking responsibility as he appears. If the engine and trans were winterized, I do not see a issue with them, but like Doug, I worry about the starter, blower motor, and the other electrical items that were submerged in the ice as well as the glass and structure of the hull. You may need to speak with him/them and ask if you can take the boat to a known good dealer and have the structure checked as well.

I would also want to get everything in writing. Stating that you picked the boat up full of ice and the mechanic assumed responsibility for the mistake of leaving the plugs in and assumes all cost as well. Take that to your insurance, so they can have everything ready if need be for a legal case.

DavidMCX30
01-03-2011, 01:13 PM
Thanks for your insights. It was tented but I haven't treated since I bought last April and I suspect former owner never treated. It was winterized, thank goodness. He mentioned the starter could be an issue. But, like you said, it's the structural damage that concerns me. Great suggestion on calling insurance. In my disgust, I hadn't considered that as I don't know if there is damage yet. But I am calling now.

I'm so sorry to read this. As for how it got in there, sunbrella canvas is water resistant if regularly treated with something like 303 Fabric Guard, but still breathable. If it has not been regularly treated, it will lose its water resistance. So if the cover was tented, but not treated, it might still leak. If treated, but not tented, it will definitely leak. I'm not sure how they had it set up, but one way or the other, the water came through the cover and that is not uncommon. The real issue is, obviously, that the plugs were not pulled.

If the boat was winterized, the block should be fine. It's the electrical stuff, starter, etc., that will be toast from something like this. I'd also be concerned about the expansion of the freezing water in a confined space stressing the glass and other structures under the deck.

Take a look at your insurance policy to see what your deadlines are for reporting a claim. They may be able to fix the engine and its components, but the structural problems may be latent and I wouldn't want to rely on a marina to warrant them into the future.

DavidMCX30
01-03-2011, 01:17 PM
Thanks for the sympathy and good advice. I am starting to document everything right now. I have some photos but will take even more tonight when I get home. Really appreciate the responses.

So truly sorry to hear this...
I hope your mechanic at the marina is as good about taking responsibility as he appears. If the engine and trans were winterized, I do not see a issue with them, but like Doug, I worry about the starter, blower motor, and the other electrical items that were submerged in the ice as well as the glass and structure of the hull. You may need to speak with him/them and ask if you can take the boat to a known good dealer and have the structure checked as well.

I would also want to get everything in writing. Stating that you picked the boat up full of ice and the mechanic assumed responsibility for the mistake of leaving the plugs in and assumes all cost as well. Take that to your insurance, so they can have everything ready if need be for a legal case.

Double D
01-03-2011, 01:52 PM
Can you post the pictures? Were kind of sick like that.... :D

bturner2
01-03-2011, 02:06 PM
While my cover seems to be fairly water tight I still get considerable water after hard storms, mostly from the openings in the cover for the tower. Add melting snow to the mix I can certainly see this as a major problem. As a rule I pull the center plug on my boat whenever it's left on the shore station or trailer while not in use.

Don't know the X30 very well but the bilge pumps would probably be toast for sure and I'd be looking real close at any ballast manifolds as well as any plastic hull fittings. If the boat has a hard tank for ballast in the floor I'd really be looking at it to see if cracked due to the pressure and cold conditions. If it is damaged it might be a real bear to replace without separating the hull and deck joint. From a structure perspective I'd be looking at the floor to the hull joint and the stringer system.

As far as other damage it might be well advised to spring for a boat survey to document the condition of the boat. A competent surveyor will go over the hull and mechanical components with a fine tooth comb especially if he has a "heads up" on what the boat's been through. This would also give you a professionally documented report of any damaged that has occurred should you need to pursue legal recourse, god forbid.

Really sorry to hear about this. Best of luck getting this resolved. Let's hope that all that's needed is a good thaw.

DavidMCX30
01-03-2011, 02:45 PM
My pain is your pleasure! I will post some pictures if I can figure out how to do it and find some time!

Can you post the pictures? Were kind of sick like that.... :D

TX.X-30 fan
01-03-2011, 02:45 PM
The ECM too huh

DavidMCX30
01-03-2011, 02:53 PM
Just got off the phone with my insurance agent. He agrees with documenting everything but at this point, there is no known damage. And I am hoping marina insurance will cover any damage. Fortunately the center ballast is a sac, but I bet it’s toast. Question on the survey—who would I call for that? Insurance agent wasn’t sure. Thanks for the good wishes.

While my cover seems to be fairly water tight I still get considerable water after hard storms, mostly from the openings in the cover for the tower. Add melting snow to the mix I can certainly see this as a major problem. As a rule I pull the center plug on my boat whenever it's left on the shore station or trailer while not in use.

Don't know the X30 very well but the bilge pumps would probably be toast for sure and I'd be looking real close at any ballast manifolds as well as any plastic hull fittings. If the boat has a hard tank for ballast in the floor I'd really be looking at it to see if cracked due to the pressure and cold conditions. If it is damaged it might be a real bear to replace without separating the hull and deck joint. From a structure perspective I'd be looking at the floor joint to the hull joint and the stringer system.

As far as other damage it might be well advised to spring for a boat survey to document the condition of the boat. A competent surveyor will go over the hull and mechanical components with a fine tooth comb especially if he has a "heads up" on what the boat's been through. This would also give you a professionally documented report of any damaged that has occurred should you need to pursue legal recourse, god forbid.

Really sorry to hear about this. Best of luck getting this resolved. Let's hope that all that's needed is a good thaw.

DooSPX
01-03-2011, 03:22 PM
The center ballast is a bag, but do you have any other ballast systems? I'm sure they are all toast if they were in the ice.

Good luck!
Please keep us informed

bobx1
01-03-2011, 04:39 PM
I am not an insurance agent and have never played one on TV but I had a lightning hit on my house a few months back and we were not sure if I would be able to meet the deductible but my agent went ahead and started a pre-claim process so everything would be documented in case I ran into issues over the next 12 months. Certain things appeared normal at first but the security system ended up being partially fried, the cable was partially fried, certain receptacles needed to be replaced, etc., etc. My point is that things can and will start to add up and it may be months before you know all the damage and my agent said I had up to a year to file all items on the claim.

I would get some written documentation (not just "we spoke on the phone at the begining of the year") back from your insurance AND the marina indicating you have put them on notice for possible damage.

A marine survey is a great idea BUT I am not sure how much stuff they can/will find during the winter. They can de-winterize and start doing some things but then you will have to re-winterize and I bet some things will not come to light until you get it out on the water for an extended period of time.

vision
01-03-2011, 06:12 PM
Your ballast bag and any rear tanks may actually be fine. The bag should not be damage from the expansion of external ice. The rear hard tanks could have been damage by compression, but those tanks are fairly thick and may not have split. They may have partially collapsed and if so, may have prevented damage to your hull by absorbing some of the expansion of the ice. The compressive forces on the ballast hoses should have been fairly equal and the hoses may not have collapsed.

Any electrical equipment that was under water was likely damaged by the moisture if not the ice. Battery cases are not terribly thick and may have cracked from the external ice pressure. Make sure you pull the battery as soon as you can to avoid leaking acid into your boat.

Was the floor bowed up at all? If the ballast tanks did not absorb enough of the expansile force, I would guess that the floor would be the next item to bow as it is thinner than the hull.

It is amazing that much rain came in through your cover in that short a period. You must have had some serious rain the last few months!

I hope the dealer and your insurance company make it right. Clearly there was no owner error in this scenario.

JLeuck64
01-03-2011, 06:13 PM
I would second the need to call a Marine Surveyor. Should be able to find one in the yellow pages

JMann
01-03-2011, 07:26 PM
My boat was hit by some kids in an aluminum fishing boat and my insurance had this place come do the survey. They are international and might have someone in your area. The guy that did mine was good. There can be invisible cracks they have ways of detecting which can or can not be structural.

http://www.daviscoltd.com/

I met the guy at the shop and we reviewed everything together. Take the day schedule when you can meet him at the shop and take the time to do it. Good luck I hope they don't find to much damage.

TX.X-30 fan
01-03-2011, 08:17 PM
I would be worried the rest of the time I owned the boat about what will go wrong next, might want to feel the guy out and see how well insured he is and just let him pay for the boat and keep it.

east tx skier
01-03-2011, 08:25 PM
I would be worried the rest of the time I owned the boat about what will go wrong next, might want to feel the guy out and see how well insured he is and just let him pay for the boat and keep it.

That's the inner lawyer I knew you had. Listen to Stu, he's pre law.

2RLAKE
01-03-2011, 09:34 PM
do you have a heater? If so, make sure it was completely drained

Slinkyredfoot
01-03-2011, 09:57 PM
Where in Indy are you and where did you take and store you boat? Remedies my friend, I am a local and maybe I can help. ;)

bturner2
01-04-2011, 10:56 AM
You can also find some marine surveyors at boatus.com.....

http://www.boatus.com/insurance/survey.asp

Nice write up on what to expect and how to choose a surveyor also.

bobx1
01-04-2011, 11:06 AM
....Listen to Stu, he's pre law....

How many years has he been in pre-law??

John "Bluto" Blutarsky: "Christ, seven years of college down the drain. Might as well join a ***** peace corp."

merCrewser
01-04-2011, 11:27 AM
Long time lurker (8+ years), I registered to answer as this happened to me. You're doing the right thing in documenting and letting the mechanic handle it. I did want to say though, as unsettling as seeing a boat full of ice is, the damage is usually not too bad. I did not replace anything, not even the starter on my boat (an I/O not a MC). I even had water in my engine oil. It will take quite a while to thaw out, even in a heated shop. Mine took a week (!) before I could break up the remaining ice.

I wanted to put your mind at ease that this will probably all work out fine, with just minor things being replaced. I would insist on the starter and any other electrics that were submerged for piece of mind as this was not your fault. I would think the hull will be fine. Mine was and it was no MC.

BTW, you'd be surprised how often this happens! (And think of all the used boats exchanging hands out there) Something to think about....

BTW, I was around for that frozen (I think Supra?) left in the lake, back in '03 or so. Guys took pics of them playing on it, frozen on the ice. And as I remember the damage wasnt as bad as everyone thought it would be. Maybe someone could dredge that thread up?

James

broncotw
01-04-2011, 11:41 AM
Wow! Sorry to hear of your misfortune... It's hard for me to imagine 50 gallons of water entering into your boat although it was covered... That's a substantial amount of water... I guess I cannot envision how much 50 gallons of water actually is.... I am glad to hear the mechanic at your marina is taking responsibility and assisting you.... Keep up posted and please post some pictures...

east tx skier
01-04-2011, 11:45 AM
Ah, the Frozen Tigé.

http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/attachment.php?attachmentid=4613&stc=1&d=1135187398

Link to Thread (http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=6368&highlight=frozen+tige)

milkmania
01-04-2011, 12:07 PM
Ah, the Frozen Tigé.

http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/attachment.php?attachmentid=4613&stc=1&d=1135187398

Link to Thread (http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=6368&highlight=frozen+tige)


ah, the good ol days

2gofaster
01-04-2011, 01:01 PM
In reality, the only thing I'd worry about is the steering cable. The rest will be fine. I know you've spent a lot of $ and so your first thought on this is horror. But it's not as bad as you'd think.

Mgboyd25
01-04-2011, 07:45 PM
ah, the good ol days

Haha what is the story behind this one

Mgboyd25
01-04-2011, 07:49 PM
I just read the previous thread, wow I just dont understand how that got in the middle of the lake

TX.X-30 fan
01-04-2011, 07:58 PM
Ah, the Frozen Tigé.

http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/attachment.php?attachmentid=4613&stc=1&d=1135187398

Link to Thread (http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=6368&highlight=frozen+tige)




Was that pic taken in Lubbock??

Eagle Lake Rebel
01-04-2011, 09:12 PM
Get the boat running ASAP, flush engine oil and don't forget about dumping the tranny oil.....it probably does have water in it that came in via the breather.

east tx skier
01-04-2011, 09:37 PM
I just read the previous thread, wow I just dont understand how that got in the middle of the lake

Pretty close to shore. Just waited a little too long to get the boat out of the water. It was in Washington if I recall correctly.

TallRedRider
01-05-2011, 12:08 PM
At least the boat wasn't quite like this one!

As I understand it, the water was pretty much up to the rubrail on this one.

east tx skier
01-05-2011, 12:19 PM
That should buff out. :o

dpolen
01-05-2011, 01:02 PM
At least the boat wasn't quite like this one!

As I understand it, the water was pretty much up to the rubrail on this one.

Magic Eraser should clean that one right up :rolleyes:

thatsmrmastercraft
01-05-2011, 01:04 PM
If only they had saved a couple of those little bags of desicant from the last time they bought shoes. :rolleyes:

sand2snow22
01-05-2011, 01:06 PM
No problem with 1 to 2 bottles of magic cleaner from the dollar store.

scott023
01-05-2011, 01:19 PM
Yikes, that's a fugly mess.

flipper
01-05-2011, 01:49 PM
Yeah it is

Joseph
01-05-2011, 04:59 PM
don't "feel the guy out"- you may get in trouble. When we bought our boat, the dealer had left the boat out and not taken out the plugs either. the owner had towed the boat to their garage and it was filled with water and transmission fluid in the hull for 2 months. somehow, the water had gotten into the transmission and displaced the fluid. The water level was 1/2 way up the ski locker. We rebuilt the tranny and no problems since-how do you do a cross your finger smiley. (well, except for hitting some concrete :) The dealer here was not so accomadating and denied any responsibility. They said that they "never" remove the drain plugs so that customers don't sink their boats when putting them back in the water.-hmmm But i'm with the others. if ice can freeze and crack a metal engine block-whats it going to do to the hull? Is there some sort of uv light scan or imaging they can do to the hull? Thought they do something like that for concrete bridges.

Joseph
01-05-2011, 10:14 PM
holy crap. i love this site! no matter how bad you mess up, someone here will show you worse and in doing so, make you feel better. Sooooo therapeutic!!

DavidMCX30
01-05-2011, 10:36 PM
Quick update on my boat and a link to some photos on a public Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2065898&id=1432767256&l=ce34d22f82


First, a BIG thanks to all who have responded. You’ve given me a great punch list of things to check out. This community is amazing. And I also appreciate all who have tried to help me off the ledge. It has been unsettling to say the least. But, at least my boat isn’t frozen in the middle of a lake or look like it was part of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill….I guess it’s all relative.

My mechanic picked up the boat today to start the great melt down. He offered to put everything in writing and assume all responsibility for any damage related to freezing. As I said, he’s a good guy and I’m going to work with him to see if we can get this straightened out. I looked into marine surveyor but the closest ones are in Ohio or Chicago. Rather than let the water unfreeze and refreeze multiple times before I could arrange to haul the boat over the state line, I want to get the water out. So it’s in the shop thawing now.

I have also spoken to a friend who is a lawyer and he is going to help guide me through this process. I continue to hope that we don’t have to go down a legal path. But as they say, hope isn’t a strategy….

The good news – I think -- is that the ice seems to be worse in the mid section of the hull. It’s not nearly as deep/thick back by the engine and in the storage compartments. So I think my engine and hard ballast tanks will be OK, but we’ll see. He’s going to use a camera/scope to inspect the entire hull. So I’m in wait-and-see-and-pray mode. I’ll keep everyone posted.

Thanks again!

vision
01-05-2011, 10:44 PM
Thanks for the update. I feel for your pain but appreciate you taking the time to post the images. It helps remind me not to leave the plugs in my boat when outside!

I agree with your assessment. Based on the images from your engine compartment, the damage (knock on wood) may actually be quite minimal. I would be surprised if you had any hull damage. I hope it all works out.

Sounds like you have a great mechanic!

kevkan
01-05-2011, 11:16 PM
David: Hope everything works out. Sounds like your mechanic is doing what he can to fix an obvious screw up. I don't think I would worry so much about the structure of the boat. There are so many things below the floor that would collapse before the hull would crack (flex hose, ballast bag, etc.). Now electrical components may be a different story.

Good luck.

gotta_ski
01-19-2011, 03:32 AM
Just spotted this. Wanted to chime in on the frozen Tige. It all turned out ok. The block was cracked, but everything else was just fine. The owner and I pulled it to the launch in the spring, his mechanic put a new block in it, and we've been skiing it for the last 5 or 6 summers (how long ago was that now?) I do love our mastercrafts, but I think this proves Tige builds a pretty decent hull too. Sadly I can't seem to find any pics from last summer, but the boat is doing well. And yes, as I'm sure someone is about to ask, it has made it out of the water before the ice since then. Barely.

JohnE
01-19-2011, 08:33 AM
Thats good to hear. Thanks for the update.

BNIROOSTER
01-19-2011, 04:26 PM
Quick update on my boat and a link to some photos on a public Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2065898&id=1432767256&l=ce34d22f82


First, a BIG thanks to all who have responded. You’ve given me a great punch list of things to check out. This community is amazing. And I also appreciate all who have tried to help me off the ledge. It has been unsettling to say the least. But, at least my boat isn’t frozen in the middle of a lake or look like it was part of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill….I guess it’s all relative.

My mechanic picked up the boat today to start the great melt down. He offered to put everything in writing and assume all responsibility for any damage related to freezing. As I said, he’s a good guy and I’m going to work with him to see if we can get this straightened out. I looked into marine surveyor but the closest ones are in Ohio or Chicago. Rather than let the water unfreeze and refreeze multiple times before I could arrange to haul the boat over the state line, I want to get the water out. So it’s in the shop thawing now.

I have also spoken to a friend who is a lawyer and he is going to help guide me through this process. I continue to hope that we don’t have to go down a legal path. But as they say, hope isn’t a strategy….

The good news – I think -- is that the ice seems to be worse in the mid section of the hull. It’s not nearly as deep/thick back by the engine and in the storage compartments. So I think my engine and hard ballast tanks will be OK, but we’ll see. He’s going to use a camera/scope to inspect the entire hull. So I’m in wait-and-see-and-pray mode. I’ll keep everyone posted.

Thanks again!


Something that I haven't seen anyone say yet is that you definately need an auto bilge!!! It's not a substitute for pulling your plug but it will keep you out of trouble when you overlook the plug.

Jim@BAWS
01-19-2011, 05:19 PM
Just spotted this. Wanted to chime in on the frozen Tige. It all turned out ok. The block was cracked, but everything else was just fine. The owner and I pulled it to the launch in the spring, his mechanic put a new block in it, and we've been skiing it for the last 5 or 6 summers (how long ago was that now?) I do love our mastercrafts, but I think this proves Tige builds a pretty decent hull too. Sadly I can't seem to find any pics from last summer, but the boat is doing well. And yes, as I'm sure someone is about to ask, it has made it out of the water before the ice since then. Barely.


BUT ITS ALL OK!!!

east tx skier
01-19-2011, 05:41 PM
All things considered, I'd say it could have been worse. :)

http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/attachment.php?attachmentid=4613&stc=1&d=1135187398

Luv2Ski
01-19-2011, 06:14 PM
Wow, now that is what I call "forgetting to winterize"

CantRepeat
01-19-2011, 06:44 PM
BUT ITS ALL OK!!!

It's all relative, I guess.

If you don't give squat enough to get your boat out of the water, then a busted block isn't that bad considering what could have happened, I guess.

I know we've all had bad luck in our lives, but sometimes you make your own luck, I guess. :rolleyes:

IE I guess he was lucky it didn't crush the hull and sink to the bottom.

Miss Rita
01-19-2011, 07:13 PM
If you look back about six posts you'll read the rest of the story re the Tige.

thatsmrmastercraft
01-19-2011, 07:22 PM
Just spotted this. Wanted to chime in on the frozen Tige. It all turned out ok. The block was cracked, but everything else was just fine. The owner and I pulled it to the launch in the spring, his mechanic put a new block in it, and we've been skiing it for the last 5 or 6 summers (how long ago was that now?) I do love our mastercrafts, but I think this proves Tige builds a pretty decent hull too. Sadly I can't seem to find any pics from last summer, but the boat is doing well. And yes, as I'm sure someone is about to ask, it has made it out of the water before the ice since then. Barely.

What is the rest of the story on how the boat came to be frozen in the middle of the lake?

CantRepeat
01-19-2011, 07:51 PM
If you look back about six posts you'll read the rest of the story re the Tige.

I knew the rest of the story when I posted. I was reenforcing Jim's point that it was all ok, I guess. 8p

east tx skier
01-19-2011, 08:03 PM
What is the rest of the story on how the boat came to be frozen in the middle of the lake?

I posted this link (http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=6368&highlight=frozen+tige)earlier in the thread about the Frozen Tigé a/k/a Tigécicle a/k/a Tigéerita. I think the explanation is in there somewhere. I think the owner was out of town and didn't get back in time, but memory fades. It's 11 pages of fun reading. But I've already read it once. The pictures are classic!

Table Rocker
01-19-2011, 08:18 PM
I posted this link (http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=6368&highlight=frozen+tige)earlier in the thread about the Frozen Tigé a/k/a Tigécicle a/k/a Tigéerita. I think the explanation is in there somewhere. I think the owner was out of town and didn't get back in time, but memory fades. It's 11 pages of fun reading. But I've already read it once. The pictures are classic!Can we just call it Endurance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endurance_%281912_ship%29)? Sir Ernest Shackleton would have been proud.

east tx skier
01-19-2011, 08:31 PM
Those guys should have winterized sooner. ;)

gotta_ski
01-22-2011, 07:17 AM
Jim, I totally missed how funny this was until you pointed it out. I wasn't the one paying the repair bill, so it didn't seem like as big a deal to me. When I looked at your post with the highlighted section from mine I laughed out loud. One other detail that might help explain the pictures is that the boat lives on a buoy in front of the dock instead of being tied to it. This is why it looks like its out in the middle of the lake. That said, Its all OK!!:)

Just to show that a lack of brains seems to be in the water around here, here's a pic of pulling my boat out this fall (winter?). I hope this doesn't get me kicked off here for appearing to be an idiot. We had to use the blower to clear wheel tracks up the ramp.

gatorguy
01-22-2011, 09:13 AM
We had to use the blower to clear wheel tracks up the ramp.


Now that is awesome. Anytime you have to use a snow blower to go skiing I think you get extra "tough" point.

captain planet
01-22-2011, 08:54 PM
Had a nasty New Year's Day surprise in Indianapolis. Went to pick up my 2002 MC X-30 from the marina after having it winterized, acid wash, etc. I bought the boat this past spring so am somewhat new to boat ownership. The marina had held on to the boat after winterizing and repairs while getting an estimate for some minor gel coat fixes. When I got to the marina, everything seemed fine, except I was surprised to see the back plug still in. Canvas was tightly secured. I removed canvas for travel and everything looked OK. Towed my boat home only to do some work on it and notice some water on the carpet when I arrived. We have had a long stretch of below-freezing temperatures, but it warmed up for several days. I opened the ski locker and was stunned to find it completely filled with solid ice that had only just begun to melt. I then opened the circular cover that gives access to the plug in the middle of the hull. Another solid block of ice up to the top. Opened the engine and storage compartments to also find water/ice. I nearly puked.

The good news is that I called the marina and the head mechanic immediately apologized and said the plugs never should have been left in. He’s a good guy and former MC dealership owner, and the best I’ve found in the Indy area. He is going to pick the boat up tomorrow and take it to his shop to thaw out and see if there was any damage. I’m scared there may be visible damage, but am also worried that this could cause problems for years to come if the expanding ice put pressure on hoses, values, engine parts, etc.

I first took photos of everything for insurance purposes and, heaven forbid, if we would have to go down a legal route. With temperatures dropping back below freezing, I removed the back drain plug and emptied more than 50 gallons of water, measured in a bucket that I emptied multiple times. And that is just a small fraction of the total volume of water/ice in the boat. A drop in the bucket, so to speak.

So two questions for the kind experts here:
1) What kind of damage should we look for? What type of immediate damage could we find? And what potential damage could occur later on that we wouldn’t know about until something breaks?

2) What could have allowed THAT much water into my boat in the first place? After talking with the mechanic, he said the boat had been outside while we waited on the gel coat estimate (I thought it had been inside the entire time). We did have some heavy rain and a lot of snow over this period. He told me he had brushed the snow off a couple of times. Canvas seems fine and I just had it repaired over the summer. Never have had any issue before with water getting in.

And the shame of it is that I paid for indoor storage at another location, but hadn’t moved the boat yet due to ongoing repairs. Any advice and prayers are greatly appreciated!

I'm so sorry to read this. As for how it got in there, sunbrella canvas is water resistant if regularly treated with something like 303 Fabric Guard, but still breathable. If it has not been regularly treated, it will lose its water resistance. So if the cover was tented, but not treated, it might still leak. If treated, but not tented, it will definitely leak. I'm not sure how they had it set up, but one way or the other, the water came through the cover and that is not uncommon. The real issue is, obviously, that the plugs were not pulled.

If the boat was winterized, the block should be fine. It's the electrical stuff, starter, etc., that will be toast from something like this. I'd also be concerned about the expansion of the freezing water in a confined space stressing the glass and other structures under the deck.

Take a look at your insurance policy to see what your deadlines are for reporting a claim. They may be able to fix the engine and its components, but the structural problems may be latent and I wouldn't want to rely on a marina to warrant them into the future.

If this boat is a 2002, they MC used a press in floor where the voids were completely injected with foam. Then the decks were set in that had the seats built into them. I would think that if this boat were a 2006 or so when MC changed to the grid stringer system there would be a greater chance for damage since the entire floor of the boat is incorporated into the deck mold. The floor sits on the stringers and if there was water that expanded in there it might lift up on the deck portion of the boat and you would see stress along the deck joint. The older boats such as this don't have this system and I would think would be alright.

DavidMCX30
03-16-2011, 12:26 PM
Original poster here …. After a winter of some fretting but mostly trying to chill out over my frozen boat situation, I am looking forward to my spring start so I know where things stand. In the meantime, I’ve had conversations with three different lawyers – all who are friends or friends of friends – and, just today, with a marine surveyor. All three lawyers counseled that there is no known damage at this point and that the marina is approaching the issue in the right way.

My conversation with the marine surveyor today also eased my mind. He told me that the only real issues would be the starter and alternator. He highly doubted there would be any structural issues – and if so it would only be the floor coming loose, which would be visible/noticeable. He was great to speak with and counseled against doing a survey. I thought that was very cool so I would recommend David and Co. Marine Surveyors for those of you in the Midwest who might need their services: 1-800-223-8816.

So, waiting until spring to see what – if any –issues I have … and hoping my marina stands behind its promise to fix anything that’s wrong. I’ll keep everyone posted. Thanks for all the empathy and suggestions.

David4MCSammyDuvall
03-16-2011, 03:15 PM
David, Thanks for sharing this with all of us. I'm praying that things will go smoothly to bring the boat back in shape. I just seem don't understand why would MasterCraft make cheap MC covers on boats. My MC cover does not keep the water out of the boat. I had to take my MC to the repair shop for some repairs. I brought a tarp with me. I warned the repair man that my MC needs to have a tarp over the MC cover. It was sitting outside in the rain without the tarp. He assumed that the MC cover would take care of it. NOT !!!! There was mold and mildew all over my boat. I was so furious about it. Had to clean it up and let the sun in. I decided not to depend on others to put it inside or tarp over the cover. I have to do it myself. Why build a beautiful expensive boat and not put a expensive cover on it ? Wish there's a GORTEX cover for MC boats.

bturner2
03-16-2011, 04:22 PM
Switched my cover out this year for the same reason. Sure Last Sure Sucks for keeping water out. Went to Sunbrella and will be waterproofing every year to make sure I can keep as much as the water out as possible.

It's too bad, I really liked the way the factory cover fit. Just wish it was made of Sunbrella.

j4rowell
03-16-2011, 04:38 PM
Original poster here …. After a winter of some fretting but mostly trying to chill out over my frozen boat situation, I am looking forward to my spring start so I know where things stand. In the meantime, I’ve had conversations with three different lawyers – all who are friends or friends of friends – and, just today, with a marine surveyor. All three lawyers counseled that there is no known damage at this point and that the marina is approaching the issue in the right way.

My conversation with the marine surveyor today also eased my mind. He told me that the only real issues would be the starter and alternator. He highly doubted there would be any structural issues – and if so it would only be the floor coming loose, which would be visible/noticeable. He was great to speak with and counseled against doing a survey. I thought that was very cool so I would recommend David and Co. Marine Surveyors for those of you in the Midwest who might need their services: 1-800-223-8816.

So, waiting until spring to see what – if any –issues I have … and hoping my marina stands behind its promise to fix anything that’s wrong. I’ll keep everyone posted. Thanks for all the empathy and suggestions.

Probably too busy. Busy time of year for these guys with all the new boat purchases. Without it in the water it'd probably be him just speculating anyways. I'd hold off on that recomendation and see if you boat still floats first. j/k

DavidMCX30
05-14-2011, 01:53 AM
I just wanted to follow up with what happened. She fired up beautifully last week. Took her out for two runs and she ran great. No damage as far as I can tell. The mechanic said my temperature rose to 170 degrees right at the beginning and then went down to normal quickly. He told me to keep an eye on the temp gauge but that this was not uncommon after winter storage. He said impeller may be a bit slow to move after storage. We ran her soft then a bit harder then WOT with no issues.

I want to thank everyone who offered tips and suggestions, especially those who talked me down from the ledge over the winter months when there wasn’t much I could do but fret. A call to a marine surveyor also helped put me at ease as he thought no to little damage would be done. I am keeping an eye on starter and alternator and we have an agreement if they go out this summer, my marina will replace.

As for the water getting in in the first place, seems my cover isn’t doing its job. I’ve just ordered a replacement through Evolution Covers based off the recommendation of some on this site. A salty price tag, but it’s a sexy beast.

Thanks to all and happy boating.