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CruisinGA
12-31-2010, 04:41 PM
Got a free 12ft aluminum jon boat from a buddy. We had to cut out the trees that had grown next to it and dig out the ones in it. :D (See dark line on inside of boat)

Got a free 1966 Evinrude 6hp for it. Runs/idles/shifts great. Haven't even changed the spark plugs yet.

Need to replace the wood in the transom and repair the area where the drain plug should be. A root grew through and opened it up. Also sure there's going to be leaky rivets etc.

Questions:

Should I use Gluvit or 5200 to seal rivets and places where I use bolts to replace rivets I had to remove?

Should I go to trouble of TIG welding the drain repair, or is brazing using AL flux core braze rod OK? (I can braze the repair at home, but to TIG weld have to take it to a friends shop across town and use a favor)

Is regular treated plywood OK for the transom, or do I need to paint/coat it or should I use something else all together?

Thanks for the help!

CruisinGA
12-31-2010, 04:57 PM
More pictures-

loeweb
12-31-2010, 11:14 PM
I'd have a buddy TIG the rivots just because I wouldn't want to put bolts in all the holes. Pressure treated plywood should work and I'd braze the plug hole.

Jorski
12-31-2010, 11:41 PM
I am luvin' the vice grips shift lever...

I have a free aluminum, and a really cheap old outboard on it, for the kids...leaks, and it's pretty ugly...and they love it!

Poulin
01-03-2011, 06:21 PM
No such thing as a "free boat".

atlfootr
01-06-2011, 07:50 AM
No such thing as a "free boat".Boy, ain't that the truth :rolleyes:

Bail,

I always wanted to start a thread like --- glad YOU did!

I had (note the word had is 'n past tense) a 12 footer like that as well, bought it in Gainesville from a guy for 100 bucks :D
Then came across a 6 HP Twin Sport Evinrude GREAT MOTOR, indestructible tuff as nails and super easy to work on -- fired up on at least the second pull.

Still have that motor, saving it for my next Jon boat - coming soon!
There should be some great times ahead!

atlfootr
01-08-2011, 12:18 PM
If that one doesn't work out for you, here's another one close to home.
Even gives you an excuse to come down and barefoot!

The seller can't spell w/ c*@p
14" foot John boat with a 9.9 motor for sale (pics)
http://lakeland.craigslist.org/spo/2144310223.html

CruisinGA
01-13-2011, 08:41 PM
I guess the boat's not completely free- I've already got $30 in a gas tank and line. :D

Rob- Like I said on the phone, this will be a serious frog giggin rig :steering: . I have a hunch though that it'll get used a lot instead of the X9 or Ranger just mozying from dock to dock and fishing up in the rapids where the Toccoa runs into the lake.

So pressure treated plywood should be OK, but I'd rather use marine plywood if I can find it, however, I sure don't need a 4x8' sheet. Just a scrap of 3/8" and 3/4." Anyone got any idea where I could find cutoffs or partial boards around Atlanta/ Athens GA? Would also use some of that new composite stuff if I could find it.

atlfootr
01-13-2011, 08:56 PM
Bailey,

Last time I looked Marine Plywood was go'n for $100 bucks a sheet ... 4 x 8 3/4" don't blieve it's available in 1/2"
I may know of a place in Buford that you possibly can call tomorrow, they may have a small piece laying around :)

daverbeck
01-16-2011, 09:46 PM
I hope you're wrong about the no such thing as a free boat. Just bought a cottage and they left a 14' row boat that wasn't included in the deal. I'll have to wait until spring to see if it floats - burried under snow for the next few months. Then I will know if I actually got a "bonus" boat or some trash they didn't want to haul away.

psychobilly
01-16-2011, 10:19 PM
If you want this to last fer the kids and have a good frog gigg'n rig fer years to come, I would get the Marine plywood. Cut the transon to fit and then encapsulate it with the West System epoxy. This will seal it and it will last. I would also use the favor from across town like some others have suggested and get it welded up. Use a scrap pice and put on the transom across the ply where the outboard mounts screw in to keep from wearing out your plywood and epoxy investment.

Use the left over epoxy and plywood for a false floor in the boat. makes fer easier walking and putting coolers and stuff on the floor.

Oh and make sure you clean that pot real good before bawl'n crawfish in it next time. lol

my 2 cents

TRBenj
01-20-2011, 10:59 AM
If you want this to last fer the kids and have a good frog gigg'n rig fer years to come, I would get the Marine plywood.
This is terrible advice. Why would you recommend marine ply?

Exterior ply (1/6 the cost) uses the same waterproof glue as the marine grade. The only difference between the 2 is the number of allowable voids in the wood. Unless youre using the wood on a boat hull, there is no need for marine grade.

I would CPES (clear penetrating epoxy sealer) once the wood is cut to shape first, then recoat with epoxy resin. You can make your own CPES by thinning the resin slightly with xylene. No need for West System ($$$) epoxy, there are many choices out there that perform great at a fraction of the cost. Check out US Composites. Make sure you topcoat the finished product with paint- epoxy resin does not have UV inhibitors in it so it should not be left exposed to the elements.

As far as rivits go, why not simply replace the rivits that are loose or missing? You can pick up rivits and a gun for cheap at home depot. Gluvit is the ticket for repairing leaky (but not visibly loose) rivits. It works good from the outside, but its supposed to be even better if applied to the inside.

CruisinGA
01-25-2011, 07:15 PM
What about treated plywood? Is this what you mean by 'exterior' ply? I can't find any in a 1" thickness around here, but I could buy 1/2" and us it for the outside of the transom and laminate it for the inside using waterproof polyurethane wood glue.

Strongly considering the CPES, thanks for the recommendation.

Also- anyone know anything about flotation foam? Thinking about filling the now hollow seats with the stuff so I won't lose my engine if the boat capsizes.

CantRepeat
01-25-2011, 08:21 PM
I keep looking at this and the one thing that comes to my mind is a sheet of 18 gauge aluminum and pop rivets and then just silicone it up. I don't think I would put much effort into it.

TRBenj
01-28-2011, 10:03 AM
What about treated plywood? Is this what you mean by 'exterior' ply? I can't find any in a 1" thickness around here, but I could buy 1/2" and us it for the outside of the transom and laminate it for the inside using waterproof polyurethane wood glue.

Strongly considering the CPES, thanks for the recommendation.

Also- anyone know anything about flotation foam? Thinking about filling the now hollow seats with the stuff so I won't lose my engine if the boat capsizes.
No, do not use treated ply unless you dont plan to coat it with anything. The chemicals used to treat it wont allow epoxy resin to stick to it. I believe all of the untreated ply that Lowes and Home Depot carry is exterior grade (with waterproof glue).

I dont think you need 1" of ply on the inside of your transom. I used 5/8" on the inside and went full width to strengthen it. I made a smaller piece for the outside. I didnt bond them to the boat- I through bolted everything with SS hardware. Its rock solid now with a small jack plate and 15hp Johnson on it.

CantRepeat's advice on the hole repair isnt a bad one if youre looking for a quick fix... except I wouldnt use silicon. JB weld would be a better choice.

CruisinGA
01-28-2011, 01:26 PM
What is better, treated plywood or untreated exterior coated with cpes?
Treated would be half the cost.

You're right, I probably don't need 1" on the inside, but that is what was there and the hull is formed to accept it. Easier to stick with 1" than change.

There were some sound repairs using jb weld, but since I already have aluminum stock and I enjoy welding, I'd rather just fix it right. It would also be tricky to jb weld in a new drain tube. Also, I could be traveling pretty far from the dock in this boat and getting into some rapids trout fishing, would really hate to knock some jb weld loose and get wet a couple miles from home.

Thanks for your help!

TRBenj
01-28-2011, 03:39 PM
What is better, treated plywood or untreated exterior coated with cpes?
Exterior coated with CPES and then epoxy resin will be superior. Youre essentially pasticizing the wood with the resin. Besides cost, the other downfall is that you need to topcoat it (paint, etc) as epoxy resin is susceptible to UV.

CruisinGA
03-15-2011, 08:28 PM
Well, been making incremental progress since this thread.

TRBenj- thanks for the CPES advice. The two pint kit (~$30) was just about the right amount and if it makes the wood last 10 years or so, it's worth it.
Rather than find 1" thick wood, I bought 1/2" which gave me what I needed for the outside of the transom and then laminated it for the inside of the transom. I treated each piece independently with CPES and then glued.
I also added a small piece of aluminum to the inside of the transom to keep the outboard screws from tearing up the wood.

This is nothing compared to many of the large scale boat restorations on here, but nonetheless a little inexpensive project that has been fun and should be a lot more when I'm giggin frogs at midnight in August!

CruisinGA
03-15-2011, 08:31 PM
Couple more pics of the repaired drain plug. Also welded up a bunch of other small spots on the hull. First time tig welding aluminum.

CantRepeat
03-15-2011, 08:56 PM
Well, been making incremental progress since this thread.

TRBenj- thanks for the CPES advice. The two pint kit (~$30) was just about the right amount and if it makes the wood last 10 years or so, it's worth it.
Rather than find 1" thick wood, I bought 1/2" which gave me what I needed for the outside of the transom and then laminated it for the inside of the transom. I treated each piece independently with CPES and then glued.
I also added a small piece of aluminum to the inside of the transom to keep the outboard screws from tearing up the wood.

This is nothing compared to many of the large scale boat restorations on here, but nonetheless a little inexpensive project that has been fun and should be a lot more when I'm giggin frogs at midnight in August!


I have that same air nozzel!!

And is that a Miller Econo Tig?

CruisinGA
03-16-2011, 08:39 AM
It's a Miller 175 mig, my first welder, got it back in '04.
I've also got a Miller XMT 304, and I'm working on a home built "weldernator" for my '74 Land Cruiser. Unfortunately, I have to bum time on a Tig when I need to do some aluminum work.

TRBenj
03-16-2011, 11:12 AM
thanks for the CPES advice. The two pint kit (~$30) was just about the right amount and if it makes the wood last 10 years or so, it's worth it.
If you saturated it good, it should last longer than that!

Dont forget to paint it before installing though- epoxy resin does not have any built in UV protection, so it will deteriorate if left exposed to the sun.

CruisinGA
03-16-2011, 12:59 PM
I brushed the wood in two sessions until it wouldn't take anymore and glossed up on the surface! I doubt you could get much more in it even by submerging.

I didn't post a picture but both pieces have been prepped with some 220grit and painted with Valspar.

What I found interesting is how the wood changed "tone" after being treated with CPES. It sounds more like fiberglass or a hard composite when knocked than the soft pine plywood it started out as.

Thanks again for the help.

TRBenj
03-18-2011, 12:15 PM
I brushed the wood in two sessions until it wouldn't take anymore and glossed up on the surface! I doubt you could get much more in it even by submerging.

I didn't post a picture but both pieces have been prepped with some 220grit and painted with Valspar.

What I found interesting is how the wood changed "tone" after being treated with CPES. It sounds more like fiberglass or a hard composite when knocked than the soft pine plywood it started out as.


Sounds like you did a bang up job- nicely done.

When saturated with CPES, the wood basically becomes plasticized... it should last darn near forever now.