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gatorguy
12-29-2010, 02:05 AM
I have a few winter projects I still need to finish (start). I need to make my teak beautiful and I need to build a new rear seat.

I read a few threads already but still need a little guidance. Have a 97 ps205 with original back seat. It is broken in half and the PO built a Mickey mouse frame out of plexiglass that sits underneath for support. It actually works pretty well, but I want it to be right, and need the space for storage (5 kids and a wife tend to bring a lot of stuff).

My plan: deconstruct the old seat saving the old vinyl. Use the broken aluminum frame as a templet to cut a new seat out of 3/4" plywood. Cut a few holes in the plywood so air has a way to escape when you sit on the seat, and to lighten the board so small people can still lift it. Waterproof the plywood with some kind of sealant (suggestions please). Then recover it using the old foam and vinyl.

I've never done any vinyl work, so I don't know how hard this will be. Can I reuse the old stuff, or will it all fall apart? I was planning a compete reupholstering and carpet job this winter, but I got to put a new trany in the Honda instead. So I need this to last a year or two until I can redo everything (actually have someone who knows what they are doing redo everything).

gatorguy
12-29-2010, 11:48 PM
Got the old seat taken apart tonight. A couple of hours of pulling staples. My fingers are a little sore. Tomorrow I'll cut out my plywood and waterproof it. It's not hard work, but it bugs me that I'm going to all this work, and then putting the old cover back on.

1redTA
12-30-2010, 09:25 AM
I would cover the wood in fiberglass resin to water proof it

CantRepeat
12-30-2010, 09:33 AM
Check out this resto thread, start at post 136.

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=33649

thatsmrmastercraft
12-30-2010, 09:33 AM
Fiberglass is the best way. If you have to do it on the cheap, this will do the job. Three coats, especially on the edges with plenty of dry time between coats.

east tx skier
12-30-2010, 11:39 AM
I'd go with the resin for water proofing. I'd also put a couple of parallel wooden cross pieces across the center 1/3 of the seat (maybe 3 pieces from front to back) to add a little rigidity in that spot where people tend to step, i.e., the reason that seat is broken in the first place.

On the vinyl, use stainless steel staples and work from the center to the edges, stretching as you go.

gatorguy
12-30-2010, 12:39 PM
Thanks. I was thinking to sandwich to sheets of 1/2" ply for a total of 1". Do you think that will be thick enough on its own without any brackets?

mccobmd
12-30-2010, 05:04 PM
You might want to check at the hardware stor for a piece of 1/2 inch poly board. No chance then that it will absorb water. Used it in my engine compartments as dividers to keep the fat sac's off the manifolds and it works great.

gatorguy
12-30-2010, 05:18 PM
You might want to check at the hardware stor for a piece of 1/2 inch poly board. No chance then that it will absorb water. Used it in my engine compartments as dividers to keep the fat sac's off the manifolds and it works great.

I thought of that too, but didn't think it was ridgid enough without a leg to support it.

gatorguy
01-01-2011, 06:51 PM
Here is my new back seat bottom as it dries after the 1st coat of polyurathane.

rjracin240
01-01-2011, 09:08 PM
Sweet, looking forward to seeing each step. Keep up the good work you are inspiring me to get mine done!

gatorguy
01-03-2011, 12:36 AM
Ok, I did the fat lady test on my new back seat bottom today! Me (198lbs) and a friend (220lbs) stood on the middle of the plywood and bounced while only the ends were supported. It flexed a little bit but not much, and better yet it didn't break.

So for all you who were wondering it looks like 2 pieces of 19/32 plywood glued together with tightbond 2 and a hand full of zip screws is strong enough to hold up you fat aunt Bretha and her pet chihauhau.

Now I just need to finish the final coats of polyurethane (cold weather makes for slow dry times), then recover it, and I'm done. Sound easy, I'll let you know.

dirtk38
01-16-2011, 12:36 AM
I'm interested if you finished this yet and how difficult it was to re-cover it. I need to do some work to the rear seat of my '98 205, but I haven't done vinyl work before either. Got any tips or advice you can share before I rip mine open?

gatorguy
01-16-2011, 12:52 AM
I was planning to finish it today, but with the nice weather I decided to finish the work I needed to do on my trailer. The quick disconect on the break line for my removable tounge had a leak so I replaced it and flushed/blead my brakes. I also identified which lights need replacing. I plan on finishing the seat on Monday. I'll let you know how it goes.

gatorguy
01-18-2011, 12:36 AM
Alright I finished the rear seat finally. I think for having never done it before, and reusing the old vinyl and foam it turned out pretty good. It should last for a few years until I either get it redone by a pro, or I buy a brand new x7 or x14. I took a hand full of picts with the iphone, so they are not the best quality, but I will try to get them on here. Also I'm not sure how many per post I can put on so there may be a few posts.

After gluing up the plywood I put 3 coats of polyurethane on and let it dry for about a week. Then I screwed the black plastic rail back on that is the front edge of the seat. I then stapled the little cloth divider onto the wood, and applied a little glue. These two steps are supposed to keep the foam from sliding around inside the seat.

The front edge of my foam was a little beat, so I put some duct tape on it to help it keep its shape as I recovered it. I think once it's encased by vinyl it wont matter. Then I pulled the vinyl over the foam, flipped the whole thing upside down on the floor, and went to town with the staple gun. I put everything back where it was originally. I think it looks fine, even better is that it is not broken in the middle, and will be able to hold a couple of real heavy weights. (my friend and I both stood in the middle and bounced and it didn't break and we combined are 420lbs.)

Lastly I had my wife lift it up. She could, so it passed the "wife test". She wouldn't hold still for the picture though.

dirtk38
01-18-2011, 10:25 PM
Nice work gatorguy, doesn't look like it was too hard. My seat still has the original aluminum frame, but the edges have gotten bent up pretty and are starting to fall apart (its no longer wide enough to fit all the way across the boat, so I have to stuff a fender under it to keep it from falling to the floor). I wanted to avoid putting wood on the boat, but I don't see many options...

gatorguy
01-18-2011, 10:56 PM
I wanted to avoid putting wood on the boat, but I don't see many options...

I wanted to avoid wood also, but I figured a wood seat that works as intended beats an aluminum one that doesn't.

dirtk38
02-12-2011, 07:31 PM
Finished the base of my seat today. Pretty much constructed it like gatorguy, but I added two strips of aluminum angle iron on the bottom to make it stiffer (mine was flexing too much). Also attached a drawing I made in Google Sketchup in case anyone else is looking to build one (PM me if you want the original project file). Now I just have to get it covered...

643426434164343

MC4SNETS
02-13-2011, 01:11 AM
Having moved forward from a 1986 Beachcraft runabout (which was a great boat), it is so nice to have ZERO wood in my boat now.....having said that, it looks like you did a quality job on that seat, great work.

I can't believe that in the 20th century folks built seats with poorly treated plywood and steel staples (rust!).....that's what was in the old boat. Thankfully my father-in-law was on top of it and replaced I think every staple on that boat with stainless steel staples before he passed. He would have been proud of the MC I bought to replace it.....and he could have gotten rid of his stainless steel staple collection.

Nice job....

dirtk38
02-13-2011, 01:44 AM
I hear ya...it was a tough decision to put wood in the boat. I'm just telling myself that it's better than no seat at all, and this is just to get me through a few seasons. Maybe one day I'll find someone to make me a new one out of aluminum...or carbon fiber!

thatsmrmastercraft
02-13-2011, 02:25 AM
Might cost a few bucks, but StarBoard would get the job done.

Willytown
02-13-2011, 10:10 AM
does anybody know where you can buy the trim for the bottom that runs around the edge after you staple the vinyl to the seat base?

gatorguy
02-13-2011, 11:17 PM
Finished the base of my seat today. Pretty much constructed it like gatorguy, but I added two strips of aluminum angle iron on the bottom to make it stiffer (mine was flexing too much).

I was afraid of the seat flexing, and had thought About adding angle iron to mine too, but i was afraid it would cut the fat sack I planned to put under the seat in the future. I thought about putting it on the foam side of the board to keep it from ripping anything that was shoved under the seat. But after I did my 420lb bounce test I figured I didnt need anything.