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98ps190
06-29-2005, 12:14 AM
I had a blow out last year on the way up north and needed a quick fix. Long story short, my new tire is a 205 75R14, while my other tire is a 215 75R14. I feel like a knob for not noticing. Which size should I stick with. Thanks

JDK
06-29-2005, 12:59 AM
Stick with both. Not a big deal as long as the new one fits under the fender properly, and I'm pretty sure you're the only one who's ever going to notice the slight difference in size.
Btw, your new tire is a true trailer tire, right?

Tom023
06-29-2005, 10:37 AM
If they are Carlisle tires, get rid of both of them.

sizzler
06-29-2005, 10:39 AM
if they are michelins,,,boycott them for ruining your F1 grand prix :cool:

east tx skier
06-29-2005, 11:26 AM
Good luck (knock wood) so far with my Good Year Marathons.

Tom023
06-29-2005, 11:43 AM
Goodyear Marathons have a good reputation it seems whenever trailer tires are discussed.

BG1772
06-29-2005, 11:46 AM
I agree on ditching the carsliles. I had two blow outs within 150 miles of eachother on tires with less than 1000 miles on them. I headed south on a 6 hour journey. Three hours into the trip south, a blow out. Got to the lake and found a tire shop who ordered me a new tire. On the way home about 5 hours into the journey, the other tire blew out. I will not buy Carsliles again.

98ps190
06-29-2005, 02:21 PM
thanks for the info....they're both Goodyear Marathons. So no big deal using different size tires??

Storm861triple
06-29-2005, 02:31 PM
So no big deal using different size tires??
No. Not on a trailer

P-hat_in_Cincy
07-19-2005, 11:23 PM
I started to check over my brake caliper and such tonight when I noticed a golf ball size bulge on the inside of the opposite tire. It's near where the tread and sidewall meet (more on the sidewall). I always associated this with a belt break w/i the tire. Am I accurate? What can cause this? It's an '02 SA trailer hauling a X10. Can't be more than 2-3K miles on the tires/trailer and I keep the tire pressures up to snuff. Goodyear Marathons.

jraben8
07-20-2005, 01:30 PM
I started to check over my brake caliper and such tonight when I noticed a golf ball size bulge on the inside of the opposite tire. It's near where the tread and sidewall meet (more on the sidewall). I always associated this with a belt break w/i the tire. Am I accurate? What can cause this? It's an '02 SA trailer hauling a X10. Can't be more than 2-3K miles on the tires/trailer and I keep the tire pressures up to snuff. Goodyear Marathons.


I'm not sure exactly what causes it but I am sure that it will blow when it get hot again...

6ballsisall
07-20-2005, 02:12 PM
Whatever you replace them with DO NOT use auto tires/truck tires. There is a difference between the two. Years ago I worked for a customer trailer manufacturer, anyone who they made customer trailers for that did not buy a tire and wheel package from them they made sign a waiver stating the liability of the trailer was no longer the manfacturers but the owners. The side wall construction of a trailer tire (and wheel) is made to handle the twisting received when turning a tight radius when being pulled.

P-hat_in_Cincy
07-20-2005, 02:42 PM
Whatever you replace them with DO NOT use auto tires/truck tires.

No worries there. I'm replacing it with the same model. Luckily, the shop is 1/2 mile down the road.

whitedog
07-20-2005, 03:28 PM
Often times a boat trailer tire will have a cord broken in the sidewall from hitting a bump under the water at the boat launch when pulling the trailer out loaded. This happens most often a ramps where boats of differnt lengths will power load and create an uneven surface under the water. A damaged side wall can also be caused by hitting a curb when turning into a drive way. After 20+ years of pulling boats I have learned to check the tire side walls often.

Workin' 4 Toys
07-20-2005, 03:37 PM
thanks for the info....they're both Goodyear Marathons. So no big deal using different size tires??

I use Goodyears, but I wouldn't leave two different sizes. JMO

P-hat_in_Cincy
07-20-2005, 04:52 PM
A damaged side wall can also be caused by hitting a curb when turning into a drive way. After 20+ years of pulling boats I have learned to check the tire side walls often.

Tire guy said it was probably caused by "blunt trauma." Like a curb hit (not likely for me), or hitting a pot-hole (more likely). Now I will add more detailed tire inspection to my pre-trailering routine!

Kevin 89MC
08-11-2005, 12:07 PM
I have Goodyear Marathons, they are at least 9 years old, and are still in great shape. I worry more about tire rot than wear. I'd tend to agree with workin 4 toys about not leaving the different sizes. While the axle won't care (and there's no diff to worry about like a car), the brakes may tend to pull to one side a bit, and the tracking may be slightly affected. Imagine a huge tire on one side and a tiny tire on the other, and you can see that there would probably be a constant sideways force on the trailer tongue. Probably not much, but no sense in making trailering any harder than it already is. If you mainly stay local, short trips at low speed, you're probably fine, but I wouldn't want to take it on the highway. My $0.02
Kevin

Workin' 4 Toys
08-12-2005, 01:00 AM
And the brakes get applied equal to each, at least by design, so the smalled may lock up. Not that it won't by itself :rolleyes: as in my case, but you get the idea.

atlfootr
01-25-2006, 02:29 PM
Goodyear Marathons have a good reputation it seems whenever trailer tires are discussed.I'd certainly most agree as well, I've got 'em on my '93 MC BFT 200 trailer and my brother's sport'n them as well on his '95 MC PS205 trailer.

Cloaked
01-25-2006, 02:52 PM
I'd certainly most agree as well, ..........:word:

Marathons in the load range C are the shizzle... :firejump:

atlfootr
01-25-2006, 03:00 PM
The Marathon Radial is Goodyear's "special purpose" trailer tire designed specifically for use on travel trailers, campers, boat trailers and fifth wheel trailers used for hauling everything from race horses to racecars.

The Marathon Radial was developed to make towing a trailer more enjoyable and more economical while making it easier to take your big "toys" with you on the weekends.

Special purpose trailer tires are not intended to be used on cars or light trucks.

On the outside, the Marathon Radial features a rounded profile to enhance ride quality, and a symmetric tread design with a solid center rib to provide constant rubber-to-road contact that delivers dependable highway stability, traction and long lasting wear. Internally, the Marathon Radial features twin steel belts (with selected sizes reinforced with nylon cap plies) that stabilize the tread to increase traction and durability. The Marathon Radial features a polyester cord body to help smooth out the trailer's ride.

The Goodyear Marathon Radial's sidewall styling features outline white letters, subtle black letters or black letters reversed out of a circumferential serrated band. Marathon Radial tires are available in 80- and 75-series, Load Range B (35 psi), Load Range C (50 psi) or Load Range D (65 psi) ST-metric sizes for 13" through 16" wheel diameters.

Goodyear Marathon Radial (Special Trailer Service)
Warranty Rating 3 Star
Size: 215/75R14
Blackwall
Trailer Use Only
Price: $71.00 each Special
Estimated Availability:
In Stock

Goodyear Marathon Radial (Special Trailer Service)
Tire Photo Warranty Rating 3 Sidewall Style: Outlined White Letters
Blackwall Shown
Size: 215/75R14
Trailer Use Only
Load Rating C
Price: $78.00 Special
Estimated Availability: In Stock

Special purpose trailer tires are not UTQG rated.


I've heard, if you buy from "TireRack" online, their prices are really good!
Here's what I found from their website:
http://www.tirerack.com/index.jsp

After calling 'em, I was quoted $175 for (2) blkwall tires, including shipping.
Then, don't forget the installation cost! :uglyhamme

TIRE RACKS RECOMMENDED LOCAL INSTALLERS ...
Price Pledge Installer = Installers who participate in the Price Pledge program agree to display exact quotes for installation services based on tire aspect ratio. Additional or optional related installation fees are also displayed.

COMMUNITY TIRE & AUTO SERVICE
Mounting & Balancing (per tire)
Tires: $12-$20 Ea for most
Rubber Valve Stems: $1.00
Metal Valve Stems: $2.50
Tire Disposal Fee: $3.00 Ea

TIRE DOCTOR
Mounting & Balancing
Tires: $15-$20 Ea.
Rubber Valve Stems: $1
Metal Valve Stems: (Call)
Tire Disposal Fee: $2 Ea.

VIP AUTOCARE
Mounting $11.50 Ea for most Std Bal, $15 Ea for most Lifetime Bal Rubber Valve Stems: N/C
Metal Valve Stems: Priced per application
Tire Disposal Fee: $2.25 Ea


I then called "Tires Plus" and was quoted $87 per tire -
Installed & NO Shipping Fees. Hmmm, NOT REALLY that tough of a decision.

BOTTOM LINE -TIRES PLUS.

Kevin 89MC
01-25-2006, 03:14 PM
They are great. Mine were original (I think), and lasted 16 years. After posting in this thread earlier about their longevity, I proceeded to run over a metal piece at the boat launch and shred it getting it to level ground to change it. Put on new Marathons, used the older good one for my spare. :steering:

atlfootr
01-25-2006, 03:27 PM
They are great. Put on new Marathons, used good one for spare. :steering:Yea Kev, that's what I'm plann'n on do'n as well :D

BriEOD
01-25-2006, 04:42 PM
Good luck (knock wood) so far with my Good Year Marathons.
Ditto I bought mine from TireRack.com the same time ETS did. They have done fine and made 2 8+ hour (one way) trips last year.

Jim
01-28-2006, 09:47 PM
If they are Carlisle tires, get rid of both of them.

I second that!

vogelm1
01-28-2006, 09:58 PM
A bit of a thread jack here, but certainly related....I noticed when picking up my new rig last summer, that the trailer tires didn't have balancing weights on them. An issue?? A local tire shop said they could certainly do it, but it "wasn't necessary" on trailer tires. Figured they'd wear/ride better at the very least. Plus really hated to have them hammer weights on those gorgeous aluminum rims!! Any thoughts?

Footin
01-28-2006, 10:02 PM
I had mine balanced last year, one of them took 1 and 3/4 oz to get it in balance and that is alot. It's got to be easier on the bearings and tires to have them balanced.

Sodar
01-29-2006, 02:48 AM
You know, this is truly a good question... I paid $10 a tire to be "mounted and balanced" when I got my new tires in July. I have never noticed weights though... If I paid for it, I want it!!!

TMCNo1
01-29-2006, 11:35 AM
Balancing of your trailer tires should be a must. You won't necessarily feel the imbalance in the trailer tires while towing but over time your tires will appreciate it. Most tire shops will dynamically balance tires, front to back on a spin balancer, but wind up trying to put weights on the front of the wheels and the backside, and yes it sometimes can do damage to the pretty wheels and looks ugly, so just ask them to balance them the old way and use the stick on weights inside the back side of the wheel where they won't be seen. Balancing them 90% right is better than nothing! Until the dynamic spin balancer that was all anyone had anyway [called bubble balancing]. Just make sure YOU clean the wheel surface inside so the weights will stick, most tire shops will just wipe the dust off just to get you out of there, then you lose a weight or two and you have to start all over........later

vogelm1
01-30-2006, 10:26 PM
Balancing of your trailer tires should be a must. You won't necessarily feel the imbalance in the trailer tires while towing but over time your tires will appreciate it. Most tire shops will dynamically balance tires, front to back on a spin balancer, but wind up trying to put weights on the front of the wheels and the backside, and yes it sometimes can do damage to the pretty wheels and looks ugly, so just ask them to balance them the old way and use the stick on weights inside the back side of the wheel where they won't be seen. Balancing them 90% right is better than nothing! Until the dynamic spin balancer that was all anyone had anyway [called bubble balancing]. Just make sure YOU clean the wheel surface inside so the weights will stick, most tire shops will just wipe the dust off just to get you out of there, then you lose a weight or two and you have to start all over........later

Cool - Thanks for the reply guys and TMCNo1. Kinda figured that was the case...sounds like stick-on weights for me and hopefully they stay put over time. I do quite a bit of trailering at highway speed, so this is good info. Thanks again.....

atlfootr
01-31-2006, 10:39 PM
This is like a needle in a haystack. I'm in need of a 14" spare rim for my brother's '95 PS205. Pictured below is his boat w/ the rim that's currently on his trailer. It has 10 holes w/ a 5 bolt pattern, I'm guessing it's the standard stock kind.

He just had GDY Marathon's installed today, plans on keeping one of the better tire's as the spare. What kind of "Rim Style", do you call what he has? And where can I find one?

Any and all help is great appreciated :cool:
Thanks ...

east tx skier
01-31-2006, 11:02 PM
This may not bear fruit, but try looking for American Racing rims that would fit a Ford Ranger.

Or Overtons.

http://overtons.com/modperl/overtons/detail/pdetail2.cgi?r=detail_view&item_num=35116&fcat=2AN10

TRBenj
01-31-2006, 11:15 PM
This is like a needle in a haystack. I'm in need of a 14" spare rim for my brother's '95 PS205. Pictured below is his boat w/ the rim that's currently on his trailer. It has 10 holes w/ a 5 bolt pattern, I'm guessing it's the standard stock kind.

He just had GDY Marathon's installed today, plans on keeping one of the better tire's as the spare. What kind of "Rim Style", do you call what he has? And where can I find one?

Any and all help is great appreciated :cool:
Thanks ...

There are a lot of places online that carry similar looking wheels. Do a google search for aluminum trailer wheels. I believe that you are looking for a "mod" style. You should be able to find one for less than $100.

atlfootr
01-31-2006, 11:56 PM
There are a lot of places online that carry similar looking wheels. Do a google search for aluminum trailer wheels. I believe that you are looking for a "mod" style. You should be able to find one for less than $100.Your right! Thanks evryone for the help, here's what I found :)

14" 5 on 4.5 Lug Aluminum Trailer Wheel

Rim Pattern: Modular
Tire Diameter: 14"
Rim Width: 5.5"
Rim Finish: Polished Aluminum
Rim Weight Rating: 1900 lbs. each
5 lug on 4.5" Bolt Circle, 3-1/8" Center Hole

Stock # : 1350115
Our Price : $97.50
Eastern Marine (http://shop.easternmarine.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=catalog.prodInfo&productID=6258&categoryID=162)

It's in Delaware, so I'm sure there's some closer to home.

atlfootr
02-02-2006, 07:52 PM
Well, thanks to everyone's help I found the needle.
After some extenstive research for an "Aluminum Alloy" Modular Style Rim, it pays BIG!!
I found most to average around $100 buck a piece online, then you tack on add shipp'n cost came out to around $150. It was the same price, $100 buck at a few local Tire and Wheel shops.

I then made a call to a "mom'n pop / hole'n the wall tire store about a mile away, he only charged me $83 bucks w/ sales tax $86'n change. Ended up w/ an American Racing "Aluminum Alloy" Modular Style OutLawII.

I had TiresPlus install the spare @ NoCharge, since I bought the two new Marathons from them anyway.
The irony is on the inside center of the rim it said, "Made in China" and the brand's American Racing (go figure) guess they call that "JOB OUTSOURCE".

Neverthless, my brother's xsatic, :woohoo: he thinks now lil' bro's quite the savy shopper! :D

Thanks again to U all.