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View Full Version : Anchoring at Lake Powell


seth25
05-26-2010, 07:18 PM
So we are going down to Powell this weekend, first time down there. My first year with this boat, but I have been boating most of my life. We usually would just throw out a simple anchor if we wanting to stay put in a cove, no method to it.

I hear at Powell it will be a little different. We are camping in a cove, not at a campground. It may be a beach, it may be rocky, won't know until we find something. Anyway, what the best method for anchoring overnight? Forecast is calling for clear skies, no storms, so hopefully wind won't be too much of an issue. I am thinking of bringing a piece of carpet to put between the hull and beach if we find one. What about anchoring off the shore in a rocky area?

Thanks

TN X-45
05-26-2010, 09:11 PM
Dont know what Lake Powell is like, but I went camping last weekend on Allatoona and tied the boat between 2 trees from bow and stern in a small cove using old ski ropes. No worries overnight and I didnt have to worry about the anchor breaking loose.

slickwater1
05-26-2010, 09:35 PM
we usually will get a bungy rope and an anchor off the back. pull it towards the bank tie off and let the bungy rope pull it away from the shore. easy to pull back to ya and no worries of it gettin away. JMHO

FrankSchwab
05-26-2010, 09:48 PM
Depends on where you camp.

Some of the coves have rock bottoms. With these, all you can do is hope your anchor finds a crack in a rock to lodge it, because there ain't nothing for the anchor to dig into. You will, of course, have great difficulty recovering your anchor.

Some of the coves have nice sandy bottoms, and the anchor will hold fine. I've used a Box anchor for a number of years with great success (except in the rocky bottomed coves).

You won't know the actual bottom conditions until you get there - with the lake going up and down as much as it does, a nice anchorage this year could be 20 feet in the air next year.

Do make sure that, if you stretch an anchor rope up to shore, you make sure it travels underwater for at least a small distance. We've had rodents climb the line to investigate the boat before; all the piping on one seat is missing as a result.

/frank

5280Hawk
05-26-2010, 10:07 PM
thereys a product called anchor buddy which stretches from about 9-10 feet to 30+ feet. It might help.

http://www.google.com/products?q=anchor+buddy+anchor+line&hl=en&aq=1&oq=anchor+buddy

h2oskifreak
05-27-2010, 11:59 AM
Could be a little windy at Powell this weekend. Be prepared for the wind and anchor a little stronger than you would otherwise. Don't think rain is forcast, but when it says wind, believe it and try to find a protective cove. I was down last week and Rangers were telling folks to get off the lake 60 mph winds. I listened and got off just in time. Believe me it can get nasty weather when it come in at Powell. Be safe and don't drink and operate, they are getting hardcore down there and I am sure this weekend will be patroled very heavy.

jmcentire
05-27-2010, 12:07 PM
What part of powell are you going to?

I take a trip down every year and never have trouble finding a nice sandy beach. The problem we had when anchoring was the sand is so soft the anchor would pull up too easily, so we had to drop our anchor around 100 feet off shore and pull the boat back towards shore(about 15 feet from shore).

Like Frank said make sure you think about rodents when you are anchoring to shore, we usually cut a hole in a plate and put it over the anchor line above the water(about 10 feet from the boat).

Also if you do end up beaching, IMO I wouldn't use the carpet, I would think it would get sand on it and cause more damage than just the beach. The I/O that comes with us beaches at powell every year and we haven't noticed any real damage to the gel.

h2oskifreak
05-27-2010, 04:15 PM
If you are concerned about rodents, use straping type lines. Rodents can't get onto your boat that way. I have used nylon straps for years at Powell, they are srtong and lt. wt. Page end has better beaches than Bullfrog but that's only if that's your destination. Bullfrog end is rockier, but sand can still be found. Sand isn't as soft as you think on your gel coat. Keep your M.C. off shore (rocks hide under sand and grit is an issue as your boat rocks all day and night. Ever hear of "Sandpaper"?

brettmess24
05-27-2010, 04:57 PM
A little late but this is everything you need, www.slideanchor.com and the are actually in lake havasu iirc

Archimedes
05-27-2010, 06:25 PM
Could be a little windy at Powell this weekend. Be prepared for the wind and anchor a little stronger than you would otherwise. Don't think rain is forcast, but when it says wind, believe it and try to find a protective cove. I was down last week and Rangers were telling folks to get off the lake 60 mph winds. I listened and got off just in time. Believe me it can get nasty weather when it come in at Powell.

I was at Powell during one of those intense windstorms once. First day, just arriving at our site with the Houseboat and boats when it hit. Unreal. Didn't last all that long, but I could not have imagined being out on the open lake when it hit. Supposedly the week before we went, they lost something like 20 houseboats in one night due to a storm. This was back around 1995 when they had the old boats.

h2oskifreak
05-27-2010, 08:27 PM
I was at Powell during one of those intense windstorms once. First day, just arriving at our site with the Houseboat and boats when it hit. Unreal. Didn't last all that long, but I could not have imagined being out on the open lake when it hit. Supposedly the week before we went, they lost something like 20 houseboats in one night due to a storm. This was back around 1995 when they had the old boats.


Doesn't matter how old or new they are, they all sink in the right conditions (well maybe not a Whaler). About 3 years ago we saw a big one coming, we secured the anchor lines on the house boat. Doubleled the lines into the wind and still had to stay up until 3 A.M. w/ the motors under power pushing against the wind. People who don't know what they are in for can get in real trouble. Just last year we had another one and the neighbor on the beach freaked out (a little drunk) pulled his anchor and went back to the slips in the middle of the night. all he had to do was ask for help. We had plenty of rope and steaks to help him out, instead he risked his life and his wife's. He was pretty remorsefull the next A.M. when he returned.

Archimedes
05-27-2010, 11:21 PM
Doesn't matter how old or new they are, they all sink in the right conditions (well maybe not a Whaler). About 3 years ago we saw a big one coming, we secured the anchor lines on the house boat. Doubleled the lines into the wind and still had to stay up until 3 A.M. w/ the motors under power pushing against the wind. People who don't know what they are in for can get in real trouble. Just last year we had another one and the neighbor on the beach freaked out (a little drunk) pulled his anchor and went back to the slips in the middle of the night. all he had to do was ask for help. We had plenty of rope and steaks to help him out, instead he risked his life and his wife's. He was pretty remorsefull the next A.M. when he returned.

Yup, IIRC we spent about 90 minutes with one person at the throttle and four of us holding two ropes, keeping the houseboat pointed in the right direction. The wind made a pretzel of the brand new awning I had set up on the top deck before I could even get up there and get in uncinched.

It was our first night there and I remember thinking 'what the heck did we get ourselves into?', then it was beautiful for the next 7 days.

h2oskifreak
05-27-2010, 11:55 PM
Here is another reason to not use carpet and put her on the shore. The reason Red Sand. Lake Powell sand can stain carpet under the right conditions. Anchoring with the bow out as stated prior with a bunngie allows people the benifit of washing the sand off and entry on the platform. Be careful when bringinging in the boat to keep it deep enough to keep the prop off the rocks. Sounds basic, but a friend loaded a big person on the platform and bent a blade in the process.

FrankSchwab
05-28-2010, 12:41 AM
I'll echo the other comments - don't beach it.

Drop the anchor as far out as you have anchor line (150' makes a nice length, but having a second 150' length for deep coves wouldn't hurt) - a second boat makes this easy. Hold the boat near shore, stern to the beach, take the anchor to the end of the line and drop it. Have a chain rode on the anchor - it helps a lot. Set the anchor well.

Have a couple of friends hold your boat as close to the shore as you want it to get - make sure nothing expensive is going to pound on the bottom. Pull the anchor rope as tight as you can, put a loop in it, and put a steel carabiner through the loop. Attach the 'biner to your bow eye. Verify that you can't pull the boat too close to shore. You've got an anchor line.

Attach a rope to the stern with a carabiner. Let the boat out; it should get pulled out 5 or 10 feet by the tension on the rope. Tie off the stern line to the shore with rodent protection. I just anchor the stern lines in 6" of water; it guarantees the little bastards won't get on the line.

When you want to get on the boat, pull it to shore with the stern line. Disconnect the biner, float away from shore, disconnect the anchor line biner, and go skiing.

Oh, by the way, did I mention that you should put a big float on the anchor line so you don't lose it?

Anyway, come back, attach the anchor line, and apply light power towards the shore; as the anchor line comes taut the boat will rotate stern to the beach. Have someone jump off, grab the shore line, click it onto the stern, and you're anchored.

If you don't have enough stretch in the anchor line to get the boat moved safely offshore, tie something heavy to the anchor line about 25-50' from the anchor. I use a 5-pound mushroom anchor. When you pull the boat to the shore, it lifts the mushroom anchor off the bottom. When you release, the mushroom anchor pulls the boat out as it sinks.

I haven't tried the anchor buddy, but I've looked at buying one a couple of times. Never pulled the trigger, though.

Good luck if you get this message. Post a new thread with pictures when you get back.

/frank

Thrall
05-28-2010, 09:52 AM
Seth25..........you stink! :D
Saw you going thru Vail about 45min ago, lucky dog.

We don't get to leave until this afternoon, boat's sittin in the drive, hooked up ready to go!

seth25
06-01-2010, 01:46 PM
Hey Thrall, you were the ones with the black X2? We saw you alot over the weekend. I think that you even went right past us when we were back in the cove by the huge cave on Saturday.

Thrall
06-01-2010, 02:44 PM
Yeah, that was us. Saw you guys surfing alot. Good time was had by all on this end!
Yep, saw you back by those big ampitheaters too.

seth25
06-01-2010, 02:50 PM
How about that wind on Friday!!! We had some not so happy females when we finally reached camp, wow!!

Thrall
06-01-2010, 04:20 PM
Didn't get there until Fri night, put the boat in Sat am. Heard horror stories about Friday. One of my buddies who just bought a 'bu, first time out, first time boater was out Fri. Said he got it back on the trailer in one piece, one shot, but it wasn't pretty! Fish cops told me 6 boats went under on Fri and several people in the hospital. Great weather the rest of the time.

Skipper
06-02-2010, 05:17 PM
I lived at the lake from 1968 to 1996. When those big storms come up the best thing to do is find a sheltered canyon, cove, or draw and hunker down until it passes. Get out of the open water. I have seen waves taller than houseboats. In the 70's it used to rip the marina loose from shore until a better anchoring system was developed.