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View Full Version : Minor Damage to 2000 205V


jamica joe
02-05-2010, 09:13 AM
Not sure how this happened (no one's fessing up), but the back end of my 2000 205V has been sliced and diced! If I had to guess, I think that the nose of a pontoon cut the rail.

Any ideas on repair... Can you just replace the damaged area or will you have to replace all around the boat?

BriEOD
02-05-2010, 09:17 AM
Pictures....

TMCNo1
02-05-2010, 09:25 AM
More than likely, the rubrail has splices/joints in it anyway, so piecing it may be a option if you can get replacement rubrail pieces from a MC dealer or aftermarket in the color you have. Otherwise you may have to replace the entire rubrail if you can't get replacement pieces in your color in your color.

Here is a link to a site that has replacement rubrail, http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rub-Rail--rubrail.html. (http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rub-Rail--rubrail.html)
Here is the rigid rubrail with the flexble insert if that's what you have, match up the size you have and inquire to them about the colors available, http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rigid-Rub-Rail-with-Flexible-Insert--Rigid_rubrail_flex_insert.html

jamica joe
02-05-2010, 11:08 AM
More than likely, the rubrail has splices/joints in it anyway, so piecing it may be a option if you can get replacement rubrail pieces from a MC dealer or aftermarket in the color you have. Otherwise you may have to replace the entire rubrail if you can't get replacement pieces in your color in your color.

Here is a link to a site that has replacement rubrail, http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rub-Rail--rubrail.html. (http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rub-Rail--rubrail.html)
Here is the rigid rubrail with the flexble insert if that's what you have, match up the size you have and inquire to them about the colors available, http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rigid-Rub-Rail-with-Flexible-Insert--Rigid_rubrail_flex_insert.html
Thanks for the info... The diagrams on the site do not seem to match my boats rub rail. is there a Mastercraft site that would have an "exact" match.

Is there is a thread some where on this site detailing installation?

JimN
02-05-2010, 11:22 AM
More than likely, the rubrail has splices/joints in it anyway, so piecing it may be a option if you can get replacement rubrail pieces from a MC dealer or aftermarket in the color you have. Otherwise you may have to replace the entire rubrail if you can't get replacement pieces in your color in your color.

Here is a link to a site that has replacement rubrail, http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rub-Rail--rubrail.html. (http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rub-Rail--rubrail.html)
Here is the rigid rubrail with the flexble insert if that's what you have, match up the size you have and inquire to them about the colors available, http://tacomarine.com/cat--Rigid-Rub-Rail-with-Flexible-Insert--Rigid_rubrail_flex_insert.html

A rub rail only has one joint and that's in the middle, behind the MasterCraft emblem with two screws above the swim platform.

JimN
02-05-2010, 11:25 AM
Not sure how this happened (no one's fessing up), but the back end of my 2000 205V has been sliced and diced! If I had to guess, I think that the nose of a pontoon cut the rail.

Any ideas on repair... Can you just replace the damaged area or will you have to replace all around the boat?

That would need to be replaced all around. I wouldn't recommend trying it in winter unless you're in a place that stays warm all year or has hot spells before Spring.

jamica joe
02-06-2010, 02:12 PM
Thanks Jim... Is this a project that I can do or is there someone in the Atlanta area that you would recommend

JimN
02-06-2010, 03:54 PM
Thanks Jim... Is this a project that I can do or is there someone in the Atlanta area that you would recommend

It's not so much that replacing a rub rail is hard as it's kind of a pain in the tookas. If it's warm, it's not as bad but here in the Milwaukee area, it's almost guaranteed that it has to be done during the cold season. The insert comes out easily after removing the metal or plastic piece at the center of the rear joint. Then, the screws or rivets need to come out, all loose silicone needs to be removed (denatured alcohol) and then the hull/deck joint needs to be checked for any leaks- dig out any loose sealant, wipe it with denatured and seal it. Also, it's almost impossible to re-use the holes and they won't hold well the second time around, anyway. Seal those or fill them with epoxy. Then, the rail itself goes on- hopefully, it's a little too long so it can be cut to length. Find the mid-point and tape it in place at the bow so you can work your way from front to back, drilling and screwing or riveting as you go. If you use rivets, use a backing washer- this means you'll need another person inside as you go. You can decide whether you want to use pan head screws or through bolting the rail on if you don't rivet it. I would go about every 9" with either screws or rivets. A dab of sealant on each head before the insert goes in. Cut it to length and attach at the stern. A thin bead of sealant on the bottom edge of the rail will help to keep water out.

Insert installation:

If it's warm, this part will be less of a PITA. Find the mid-point of the insert and, using a clean dead-blow mallet, slip the upper edge into the groove at the top of the insert so you can pound it in at the bottom. It doesn't really matter where you start with this because it's more flexible and it will have to be cut to length when you're done. Before cutting this, let it sit in a warm place for about a day- this always stretches a bit when it goes in and it'll naturally try to go back to it's original shape & size. Once it relaxes, cut it to length, seal the joint and install the cover.

tph
02-06-2010, 06:17 PM
Instead of filling the old holes, I inserted rivets in them. May have added a little strength.

It's not so much that replacing a rub rail is hard as it's kind of a pain in the tookas. If it's warm, it's not as bad but here in the Milwaukee area, it's almost guaranteed that it has to be done during the cold season. The insert comes out easily after removing the metal or plastic piece at the center of the rear joint. Then, the screws or rivets need to come out, all loose silicone needs to be removed (denatured alcohol) and then the hull/deck joint needs to be checked for any leaks- dig out any loose sealant, wipe it with denatured and seal it. Also, it's almost impossible to re-use the holes and they won't hold well the second time around, anyway. Seal those or fill them with epoxy. Then, the rail itself goes on- hopefully, it's a little too long so it can be cut to length. Find the mid-point and tape it in place at the bow so you can work your way from front to back, drilling and screwing or riveting as you go. If you use rivets, use a backing washer- this means you'll need another person inside as you go. You can decide whether you want to use pan head screws or through bolting the rail on if you don't rivet it. I would go about every 9" with either screws or rivets. A dab of sealant on each head before the insert goes in. Cut it to length and attach at the stern. A thin bead of sealant on the bottom edge of the rail will help to keep water out.

Insert installation:

If it's warm, this part will be less of a PITA. Find the mid-point of the insert and, using a clean dead-blow mallet, slip the upper edge into the groove at the top of the insert so you can pound it in at the bottom. It doesn't really matter where you start with this because it's more flexible and it will have to be cut to length when you're done. Before cutting this, let it sit in a warm place for about a day- this always stretches a bit when it goes in and it'll naturally try to go back to it's original shape & size. Once it relaxes, cut it to length, seal the joint and install the cover.