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TEAL98
01-27-2010, 10:26 PM
Ok, not sure whether or not to post here or in winterization, but since it's me asking a maintenance question, I'm sure you guys will find some idiotic humor in it, so here goes:D

Monday was the first day I had some free time during a weekday for a while, and since it was damn near 70 degrees, it had me contemplating about when I would be able to slip my beloved MC back in the water. Since I was originally in a rush (because of procrastinating for so long), I kinda half-a**'ed my winterizing. I wanted to run AF through the engine, while running, but since it was only me with no other help and in a time crunch, I just drained the block, removed all hoses, and let the water drain. On the back of my Indmar 350, it had black plastic plugs on the backsides of the manifolds. I decided to just drill them out and then chase the threads and install some NPT brass 3/4" plugs, like was suggested to me originally. Turns out NAPA gave me the wrong ones by a long shot. Partially my fault as I told him they looked big but he assured me they were the correct 3/4" ones I needed. Coulda/woulda/shoulda... didn't, oh well!

So I was able to drill both out and only chase one of the manifold threads before I was dead tired and freezing cold in the garage. I put the knock sensor and other plug in on the bottom of the block for both sides. Reconnected all the hoses, and the motor took right around 2 gallons of non-mixed AF. In a rush, I decided to pour AF into the inlets of the manifolds where the hoses would connect until I saw a tiny stream drain out the back of both of them. HERE IS WHERE MY POSSIBLE PROBLEM LIES!

I did this because I didn't want any water just sitting inside, and just thought I'd run some AF through it just to be sure. Not even thinking:rolleyes: could I have possibly gotten AF in my cylinders because of some of the exhaust valves being opened? I'm still new with all this and learning, but I wouldn't see why a water passage would flow right through a given area where exhaust gasses are being released? Wouldn't they have their own "pockets", or would they? I'm storing the boat in my buddy's insulated garage for the winter, and thought about going over there and pulling off the heads, just to take a peak (and of course replacing head gaskets while I'm at it). I already know I'm an idiot, so I expect some dumb remarks from this post, but a little constructive criticism would be helpful:D;) Do I have anything to be worried about? Thanks in advance fellas

~Jon

And here are those plugs if anyone was curious..

EricB
01-28-2010, 12:16 AM
Teal;
To ease your mind, you could go and pull the spark plugs to see if coolant runs out. You can then rotate it slowly so the pistons travel up and see if coolant drips out too.
Pulling the heads first seems a little drastic.

Kyle
01-28-2010, 12:40 AM
I would take the 3/4 plug out and let the fluid drain. I would go to the part store and get a 3/4 tap and clean up the threads on the manifold for the plug to go in cleanly. and I would look at the plug to evaluate replacement.

I always replace my spark plugs every year and do an oil change. I would take the plugs out and turn the key and let it turn over a time or two with out the coil wire attached. If nothing comes out you will be fine. That plug that in your pic should have fluid behind it.

The exhaust and water mix inside the piece that attaches to the exhaust hose. not at the head and manifold where you have taken the pic. If you poured af in the hose that is the water inlet you did not hurt anything. Clean up the threads and put some teflon tape on the plug to stop the drip.

In a truck it takes 2 gal of af to fill up the radiator and block, Keep in mind you have a lot of hoses and a block and risers and exhaust pipes that have to get water running through them before you see water come out the back of the boat.

I really dont think that you hurt anything. Next time be a little more patient.

TEAL98
01-28-2010, 09:19 PM
Advice taken, I thought about doing that, but I just didn't know the difference in space between the bottom of the plug hole and the the top of the piston at TDC? Main reason why I'm asking, besides the obvious, is because of a known problem with some LS1 ram-air TAs.

Seems as though the 98-02s w/ the WS6 hood, tend to leak water between the seal by the firewall/windshield and the back of the cowl on the hood. This would lead to water sitting on top of the intake, which would then accumulate during constant heavy rainfall. This accumulation would of course pile up past the injectors, with somehow water seeping through the O-ring and into the cylinder. The guy I know started his car up after 3 days of constant rain, went to go back inside to let it warm up and heard what he described as somebody shooting off a gun. End result was the car idling rough, a chunk of aluminum the size of a thumbnail laying in the driveway(looked a hair bigger to me), and oil puking out of the block. Though I, personally, have only been around a circumstance such as this, it still has made me ponder with curiosity as to how this may relate to my situatioin. We all know water doesn't combust, and though AF isn't water, I just figured I would play it safe and see what you guys would consider the best approach to take in making sure nothing got in the cylinders.

Annnnnnnnnnnnnnnyways, story time over:D. I guess this weekend I'll just take out all 8 plugs, and turn the engine over a few times (coil wire detached of course), and that should be good enough I would think. Thanks for the advice fellas

Jerseydave
01-29-2010, 11:12 AM
Turn engine over by hand first, or bump the starter just in case there is any liquid in the cylinders. Spray fogging oil in each cylinder when you're done, spin it over one more time and re-install your spark plugs.

Is it april yet? Let's go footin'! :D

TEAL98
01-30-2010, 09:32 AM
Turn engine over by hand first, or bump the starter just in case there is any liquid in the cylinders. Spray fogging oil in each cylinder when you're done, spin it over one more time and re-install your spark plugs.

Is it april yet? Let's go footin'! :D

I'm SOOOOOOOOO ready! We're getting snow this morning, waitin' on the ole' lady to get ready so we can go out. Little depressing, I was just thinking about how close we might be to putting the boat back in too:( Ah well, it'll come soon enough:D

JLeuck64
01-31-2010, 06:25 PM
what is AF???

TMCNo1
01-31-2010, 06:52 PM
what is AF???

Anti-Freeze

JLeuck64
01-31-2010, 08:55 PM
LMAO.... been trying to figure that one out since this thread first appeared!

JLeuck64
01-31-2010, 09:00 PM
Maybe I can provide something useful to this thread...

When ever I have struggled to get a threaded plug out it is much easier to apply some heat followed by some water to loosen up the threads. What I do is use an oxy-acetelene torch (propane torch may work in a pinch too) to heat up the plug until it is glowing orange. Then mist some water on the plug until it stops steaming. Do this procedure three times in a row and those plugs will just about fall out, I promise!

TEAL98
02-01-2010, 01:11 AM
Yeah, but heat and plastic don't usually go too well together:D

Hollywood
02-01-2010, 12:36 PM
In a rush, I decided to pour AF into the inlets of the manifolds where the hoses would connect until I saw a tiny stream drain out the back of both of them. HERE IS WHERE MY POSSIBLE PROBLEM LIES!

I did this because I didn't want any water just sitting inside, and just thought I'd run some AF through it just to be sure. Not even thinking:rolleyes: could I have possibly gotten AF in my cylinders because of some of the exhaust valves being opened?

Why is anyone even thinking this is possible? Unless you have rusted out manifolds, in which case you'd already have a locked up engine due to cooling water getting into the cylinders, this will NOT cause any A/F to get into your cylinders. You poured A/F into the water jackets of your exhaust manifolds, where your cooling water usually flows. You're fine.

TMCNo1
02-01-2010, 12:48 PM
what is AF???
Anti-Freeze
LMAO.... been trying to figure that one out since this thread first appeared!


Could mean Air Filter (came to me in the middle of the night) and if that's the case, "Houston, we have a problem"!

Chicago190
02-01-2010, 01:38 PM
Why is anyone even thinking this is possible? Unless you have rusted out manifolds, in which case you'd already have a locked up engine due to cooling water getting into the cylinders, this will NOT cause any A/F to get into your cylinders. You poured A/F into the water jackets of your exhaust manifolds, where your cooling water usually flows. You're fine.

This is 100% correct. If the opposite were true, everyone's engine would hydrolock or snap rods as soon as the cooling water entered the manifolds. This is the same reason you don't have to worry about sucking water in through the intake manifold - the water and oil passages are not a part of the air intake path.

JLeuck64
02-01-2010, 04:34 PM
Yeah, but heat and plastic don't usually go too well together:D

Ha Ha Ha!!!!
I just assumed those were metal plugs....
I have been a worthless contributor once again!:o

TEAL98
02-01-2010, 10:23 PM
Ha Ha Ha!!!!
I just assumed those were metal plugs....
I have been a worthless contributor once again!:o

It's ok, Chicago and Hollywood just proved me to be an idiot once again:D

Thanks for the re-assurance anyways fellas, FWIW:o

Skipper
02-02-2010, 09:46 AM
I am glad that is all straightened out. I was really confused.