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mbeach
06-15-2005, 05:27 PM
yo troops. saw a real ugly sight on side of road this past weekend. a bayliner was stranded with a wheel sitting at a 45-deg angle and fender damage. guess he lost a wheel bearing. since i will probably be towing my boat from iowa to florida this summer, i want to have my bearings, seals, race, etc. replaced and repacked. priced job at local cobolt dealer who quoted approx $300. i would have to leave boat with them and they would have to work me in, probably 3 weeks. went to local axle and frame shop who quoted $60 labor plus parts but would be less than $100 total bill. needed 2 day notice and they would have me out by noon. they do trailers of all types from boat to campers up to and including 18 wheelers. they said that there were 6 or so different size kits that fit 98% of all boat trailers and they stock all 6. i assume a mc trailer (single axle) is not too funky. so my question: is this a no brainer and too good to be true? i have replaced bearings/seals/race on an automobile which was a piece of cake, but after 2 weekends, much profanity, many beers, and a generally frustrating time getting my prop off, i think $60 labor is a real deal. bearings, it seems, can be considerably more irritang than a prop. comments ya'll.

Footin
06-15-2005, 05:31 PM
60 bucks for parts is about right if you have someone do it. I bought the parts for about 40, but you have to figure they will mark them up a bit. As for labor, I can do each wheel in about an hour and a half per side, so if thier labor 100 dollars I think that is very fair.

pilot02
06-15-2005, 05:33 PM
The price sounds reasonable. Trailer bearings aren't any different than packing/replacing the front bearings on an older car. Total piece of cake and with the right tools all 4 can be done in less than an hour.

mbeach
06-15-2005, 05:37 PM
60 bucks for parts is about right if you have someone do it. I bought the parts for about 40, but you have to figure they will mark them up a bit. As for labor, I can do each wheel in about an hour and a half per side, so if thier labor 100 dollars I think that is very fair.
thanks footin. also, is that an f-14 streaking over the water next to your name? that's my favorite fighter of all time. not many fighters of this class will ever match its mach 2.3 speed.

Footin
06-15-2005, 05:40 PM
It is a smaller version of this:

mbeach
06-15-2005, 05:41 PM
It is a smaller version of this:
nice pull!

BrianM
06-16-2005, 09:31 AM
so my question: is this a no brainer and too good to be true? i have replaced bearings/seals/race on an automobile which was a piece of cake, but after 2 weekends, much profanity, many beers, and a generally frustrating time getting my prop off, i think $60 labor is a real deal. bearings, it seems, can be considerably more irritang than a prop. comments ya'll.

Yep this is a no brainer. Take it to the trailer shop. The last thing you want is some monkey that works on stern drives replacing your trailer bearings.:noface: Plus the trailer shop won't have you down for 3 weeks :eek: during the summer.

captkidd
06-16-2005, 02:48 PM
Totally agree; trailer shop knows more about wheel bearings than the boat mechanic. When I went to local MC dealer to buy bearings, etc., for my trailer, they sent me to the trailer shop anyway. Guess it was too much to expect them to stock them.

mbeach
06-16-2005, 03:42 PM
gentlemen, i think we have consensus: trailer shop for less than $100 is way to go rather than waste valuable water time in a garage. now, i need to bleed brakes and check reservoir. where is the reservoir and is there a post anywhere on how this is done? brakes are stock drum mc 98 single axle vintage. have done this procedure many times on sport cars (mg's and triumphs) but no brake pedal to push has me cornfused (easy spelling weenies, intentionally mispelled).

Footin
06-16-2005, 03:50 PM
Fluid reservoir is located on the tongue of the trailer under a round black plastic cap.
Bleed the brakes is the same as a car, you should be able to push the front of the hitch (master cylinder) by hand as someone lays under the trailer opening and shuting the bleeder screws.
If you can not move the cylinder by hand try to wegde a 2x4 against the ground as use it a lever against the hitch.
Make sure as you do this you constantly moniter the fluid level.

mbeach
06-16-2005, 03:57 PM
Fluid reservoir is located on the tongue of the trailer under a round black plastic cap.
Bleed the brakes is the same as a car, you should be able to push the front of the hitch (master cylinder) by hand as someone lays under the trailer opening and shuting the bleeder screws.
If you can not move the cylinder by hand try to wegde a 2x4 against the ground as use it a lever against the hitch.
Make sure as you do this you constantly moniter the fluid level.
thanks footin, now i know what that little black cap is for - duh! as for the fluid, if done yearly, is dot3 or dot4 recommended over dot5? dot5 seems like a waste of money if someone will do this exercise on a 1 or 2 year cycle. any particular brand you like?

Footin
06-16-2005, 04:20 PM
This may help, it is a scan of my manual:

FrankSchwab
06-16-2005, 06:59 PM
Try here (http://www.ufpnet.com/Actuators.htm) for the full PDF of the manual.

/frank

mbeach
06-17-2005, 10:44 AM
footin and frank -- many thanks for the info. shade tree mechanic like myself should be able to do this task now

FrankSchwab
06-17-2005, 12:32 PM
Yeah, I just bled my brakes on the same trailer as you have. Got a whole bunch of ugly looking stuff out of them. The manual shows you how to actuate the brakes using a scredriver or pry bar, it's a whole lot easier than trying to move the whole front of the hitch. I used a Mity-vac to do it by myself; worked pretty well.

IMHO, just use the DOT-3 or -4, and bleed them often. You're dunking the whole brake system in the water; you're gonna get water in it. DOT-3 and -4 absorb water, so when you bleed the brakes you end up removing the water also. DOT-5 doesn't absorb water, so it tends to collect as small droplets in the system that may or may not come out when you bleed the brakes.

/frank

mbeach
06-17-2005, 04:01 PM
The manual shows you how to actuate the brakes using a scredriver or pry bar, it's a whole lot easier than trying to move the whole front of the hitch. I used a Mity-vac to do it by myself; worked pretty well.

/frank
what is a mity-vac?? sounds like a plan once i know what it is. otherwise, i must make an appointment with my 16yr old son for a copule of hours working around his summer social schedule. :D also, got some valvoline dot3/4 brake fluid and filled the reservoir. was bone dry!!! it is not necessary for me to totally submerge my trailer for launching, so i will probably change/bleed fluid on a regular basis now.
thanks again for manual.

FrankSchwab
06-17-2005, 05:13 PM
Basically, a hand-operated vacuum pump with a small reservoir jar attached to it. You hook a small line between the brake bleeder valve and the MitYVac reservoir, pump up some vacuum, and crack open the bleeder. Rather than forcing the brake fluid out (like the classic step-on-the-brake-and-hold approach), it sucks the fluid out. Mostly it means one person can do it - you don't need a helper pushing the brakes.

These guys (http://jcsonlinetoolshed.com/product.php/7740/179//be5061ce1dbc465433f6e2becf392b70) have one.

/frank

JB3
07-04-2005, 01:49 AM
I just bleed the brakes on my '96 single axle trailer, which I'm sure is similar to yours. I bought my boat and trailer from someone who never used the trailer and it just sat for four years. There was no fluid in the reservoir at all !! I had to take the bleeder valves out and the lines apart because of so much crud in them! Got all the lines and valves cleaned and bleeding is a cake. one of the easiest ways is to buy a mini-vac hand pump and pump the fluid from the wheel. If you can't get one, you can pump the actuator by hand, but you will need a helper to open and close the bleeder valve. Put a clear hose on the valve and watch the fluid come out, when you no longer see bubbles, you have all the air out, but you may want to continue until you see clean fluid. And NEVER let the level in your master cylinder get low on fluid while bleeding the brakes , You will suck in air and cause more problems then when you started. Dot 5 has silicone in it and is not compatible with Dot 3 & 4. I used DOT 4 in mine and it works great.

mbeach
07-04-2005, 07:58 PM
I just bleed the brakes on my '96 single axle trailer, which I'm sure is similar to yours. I bought my boat and trailer from someone who never used the trailer and it just sat for four years. There was no fluid in the reservoir at all !! I had to take the bleeder valves out and the lines apart because of so much crud in them! Got all the lines and valves cleaned and bleeding is a cake. one of the easiest ways is to buy a mini-vac hand pump and pump the fluid from the wheel. If you can't get one, you can pump the actuator by hand, but you will need a helper to open and close the bleeder valve. Put a clear hose on the valve and watch the fluid come out, when you no longer see bubbles, you have all the air out, but you may want to continue until you see clean fluid. And NEVER let the level in your master cylinder get low on fluid while bleeding the brakes , You will suck in air and cause more problems then when you started. Dot 5 has silicone in it and is not compatible with Dot 3 & 4. I used DOT 4 in mine and it works great.
jb -- thanks for the info. one of my valves also was crudded up, and finally unplugged. will probably get the mini-vac pump for next year.

scott88prostar
07-04-2005, 08:50 PM
gentlemen, i think we have consensus: trailer shop for less than $100 is way to go rather than waste valuable water time in a garage. now, i need to bleed brakes and check reservoir. where is the reservoir and is there a post anywhere on how this is done? brakes are stock drum mc 98 single axle vintage. have done this procedure many times on sport cars (mg's and triumphs) but no brake pedal to push has me cornfused (easy spelling weenies, intentionally mispelled).



I love that spelling weenies!