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View Full Version : Slalom binding Recommendations


MC2000190
11-30-2009, 08:22 PM
This past summer I broke my left ankle(front foot) while skiing, due to the accident I would like a binding that releases very easily during a fall, any suggestions


Thanks!

D3skier
11-30-2009, 09:20 PM
sorry to hear about your accident.. hope you are healing well and will be ready to go by next spring

I really liked the Connelly Vision bindings but they don't make them any more. About the closest boot I've found to it would be the H.O. Animal boots but have not tried them. I just broke my rear boot this summer so had to make a switch and couldn't find any thing I really liked but just switched to the Radar RS-1 boots and so far so good...only ran a few sets on them before the weather turned cold.

mikeyg
11-30-2009, 09:33 PM
Not sure if they are what you are looking for but i really like my Wiley's.

bturner2
11-30-2009, 10:17 PM
I really like my Connelly Fastbacks. Great support but you're pretty much locked into them until you unlock the lever in the back. Easy in and out with the lever released.

MC2000190
11-30-2009, 10:42 PM
Thanks for the feedback, I am going to do some research with your suggestions!

MC2000190
11-30-2009, 10:52 PM
Here ia the link to the video of my accident if anyone is interested in watching it. Its a 4 min video with the spill being at about 3:45. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc42a5JCMFQ

H20skeefreek
11-30-2009, 10:52 PM
stay away from connelley's. If I had been in something else, I wouldn't have broken my front ankle this summer. switched to animals, but haven't skied them yet.

MC2000190
11-30-2009, 10:56 PM
H20skkefreek, How long were you out? Did the ski twist your foot out?or all the way around?

nomo
11-30-2009, 11:06 PM
I would take a serious look at the Goode Power Shell binding system. I have had them for several years with no problems. My best ski friend had a similar accident like yours, two years ago. He now has several stainless steel pins and screws in his ankle. This past summer he switched to the Goode Power Shell bindings, and started running the slalom course again. The best part about the system, if you crash, both feet stay together and you detach from the ski. No twisting or rotation of the ankles. Go to: http://www.goode.com/waterskiboots.htm

MC2000190
11-30-2009, 11:22 PM
nomo, Thanks for the link I have never heard of them before!

mccobmd
11-30-2009, 11:26 PM
Bummer, sorry to hear it, that is why I decided to stay lower end on ski and wakeboard bindings. I have OK support but in bad falls both release

Chicago190
12-01-2009, 01:04 AM
Radar RS-1s were designed with consistent releases in mind and they are used by a few top pros.

H20skeefreek
12-01-2009, 06:31 AM
I've been out since June 10. My ankle hyper flexed. I was at the first wake, coming off my offside turn. I dipped the tip and compressed down over the ski. Both feet stayed fully in, had to cut my Connely's off. I'm not blaming the bindings for the fall, that was my own crappy skiing, but If I had released, I'd be fine.

MC2000190
12-01-2009, 01:13 PM
Mine happened June 28th, I broke the inside ball of my ankle, tendon pulling bone off bone! Im lucky that I didnt mess up my knee as well. It took me a long time to get my ski off! (20 min) I also believe that if the boot would have released I would have been fine!

corey
12-01-2009, 02:14 PM
OUCH!!! I mainly wakeboard since I sold my ski and blew the money instead of buying a new one so I don't have any first hand experience but I do know that H.O. is coming out with a new "hard shell" style binding that might be worth checking out. Other than that I think the Radar RS-1 boots seem like a pretty sweet design, the liners remove from the boots themselves while the stiff outer cuffs give good side to side support.

Kevin 89MC
12-01-2009, 04:45 PM
Bummer! What kind of bindings were you using when you fell? All I ever skied on are wrap bindings, haven't tried any hard shell style. I've had some nasty falls out the front, and I have always released out of my bindings when I should have, and never when I shouldn't have. Did you have a rear toe plate, or double bindings? I used to have a rear toe plate, but recently switched to doubles. They took a bit to get used to, but I feel much safer in them now.
Try some different ones, to see what you are most comfortable in. If you're near the Twin Cities, you can demo skis & bindings at a few different places around town (Midwest MC being a great one!). I tried the HO Animals and liked them. I wish I'd have tried the Radar RS-1 with their boots, but ended up getting a D3 with D3 double high wraps. They took awhile to get used to, but I feel very safe in them, knowing the ski will stay on when it should, and I will pop out of the bindings when the ski stops before I do.
Good luck,
Kevin

Hollywood
12-01-2009, 04:56 PM
I really don't see how you can blame any binding for an crash injury. If you fall compressing against the ski, physics are keeping you in the binding not pulling you out. The dynamics of the crash will dictate what happens to you, not the binding. Your heel has to be pulled out, that is the only way to release a traditional rubber "high wrap". Skiers still get injured with the plate systems, it just depends on what you're comfortable with.

I would suggest not slalom skiing for almost 4 minutes straight, fatigue leads to crashes.

Chicago190
12-01-2009, 05:59 PM
I really don't see how you can blame any binding for an crash injury. If you fall compressing against the ski, physics are keeping you in the binding not pulling you out. The dynamics of the crash will dictate what happens to you, not the binding. Your heel has to be pulled out, that is the only way to release a traditional rubber "high wrap". Skiers still get injured with the plate systems, it just depends on what you're comfortable with.

I would suggest not slalom skiing for almost 4 minutes straight, fatigue leads to crashes.

I agree for the most part, but bindings can play a role in an injury if, for example, one foot releases and the other stays in. Most of the designs these days are intended to provide consistent release, but I think some are probably better than others.

MC2000190
12-01-2009, 09:32 PM
I have a Draft binding by Connelly..............is now for sale if anyone is interested!!!

east tx skier
12-01-2009, 09:59 PM
Go Wiley and you may never go back. They have varying levels of stiffness and will work with you to get you into a comfortable boot that performs and releases. I went from O'Brien Contacts, to Animals, to Approach, to Wiley over a period of a few years. My reason for going with Wiley's boots was that I wanted something that would release (the approaches left me sore and in the ski on several occasions). Since getting the Wiley's, I've never even considered trying another boot.

MC2000190
12-01-2009, 10:23 PM
Thanks everyone for all your help!

H20skeefreek
12-02-2009, 06:32 AM
My foot came partially out. My heel lifted about an inch, then couldn't get any further, breaking my ankle. I had the appropriate forward pressure that a "wrap" style binder would have released. Like I said, it was my own poor skiing that caused the fall, but my Draft's did not allow release. I was previously on approaches, I got off of them because they held too tight. I set here typing this, HOPING that in the spring I'll be able to ski again, but am not sure b/c I still have lots of pain.

Just say no to stiff bindings!!!

Hollywood
12-02-2009, 12:33 PM
Just say no to stiff bindings!!!

That's exactly the level of comfort I was talking about.

MC2000190
12-02-2009, 12:53 PM
poor skiing and fatigue contributed to my accident......but if i had a boot that wasnt so tight I think I would have been fine. The tip of my ski some how caught the water during my fall causing my ankle to rotate 90 degrees out! OUCH!

Jesus_Freak
12-02-2009, 01:55 PM
Sorry about your fall.

Even with approach bindings (stiff and tight), I have found that my ease of release, to some extent, is controlled by how tighly I have my strings pulled. If "release" is your ultimate goal, then perhaps many different bindings would work for you, depending on what size you puchase and/or how tightly you sinch them.

Jesus_Freak
12-02-2009, 01:57 PM
... I set here typing this, HOPING that in the spring I'll be able to ski again, but am not sure b/c I still have lots of pain...

Hope so too bro. If you start skiing again, do you think you could dig deep and find it in your heart to let me ski with you next year? 8p

MC2000190
12-02-2009, 02:43 PM
It would have been nice to be able to get back on the ski before winter to get over the injury but i am in the same position where my ankle is not ready yet.

east tx skier
12-02-2009, 04:08 PM
Sorry about your fall.

Even with approach bindings (stiff and tight), I have found that my ease of release, to some extent, is controlled by how tighly I have my strings pulled. If "release" is your ultimate goal, then perhaps many different bindings would work for you, depending on what size you puchase and/or how tightly you sinch them.

During my stint on the approach bindings, I found that if they, being front laced, were not cinched down tight, they did not give me the feeling of control I wanted. In the rear lace up animals I had before, I could run them loose and not feel I was sacrificing support and control.

Just my take on it. YMMV.

MC2000190
12-02-2009, 09:31 PM
Thanks for all you help!

JohnnyB
12-02-2009, 10:05 PM
Here ia the link to the video of my accident if anyone is interested in watching it. Its a 4 min video with the spill being at about 3:45. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc42a5JCMFQ


Wow, looked like a pretty harmless fall. Sometimes those are the worst ones. Hope you're healing well.

Do you ski double boots to begin with? If not, that would be step 1 as you generally tend to stay in both or come out of both. I ski wileys bindings but have had a couple of ski buddies get nasty sprains from falling and not coming out of them....can't vouch that they'll solve your problem.

MC2000190
12-03-2009, 12:42 AM
I do not use a double boot, never have. Do we think it is the safest to be in a double boot?

H20skeefreek
12-03-2009, 06:11 AM
Hope so too bro. If you start skiing again, do you think you could dig deep and find it in your heart to let me ski with you next year? 8p
Broseph, I'd love to ski with you.

Hollywood
12-03-2009, 10:30 AM
If you want to be safe stay in the boat.

Kevin 89MC
12-03-2009, 03:09 PM
I spent 10+ years in a standard wrap front binding and rear toe plate, and never really felt unsafe while free skiing and learning the course (15 off, 30-32 mph). Once I started getting into course skiing and increasing speed & shortening the rope, I did have some close calls. On out-the-front falls I always popped out OK, but my front binding wasn't super tight. There were a few times when my back foot would get shifted in the rtp, and once it came out a bit on a wake cross, but luckily my foot stayed on the ski. I never gave it much thought until reading some horror stories, and had the minor slip out. I feel much safer now in my double wraps, I know I'll never go back. Skiing is dangerous no matter what you're using, but IMHO doubles are safer. It took me awhile to adjust to them, both for getting up on them and skiing on them, but now I can't imagine going back.
Give them a try if you can, but give yourself some time to adjust, they can be a fairly major change.
Good luck,
Kevin

MC2000190
12-04-2009, 12:42 PM
Thanks for the info Kevin!

Jesus_Freak
12-04-2009, 01:31 PM
During my stint on the approach bindings, I found that if they, being front laced, were not cinched down tight, they did not give me the feeling of control I wanted. In the rear lace up animals I had before, I could run them loose and not feel I was sacrificing support and control.

Just my take on it. YMMV.

Excellent point! I have never made this comparison between front and rear lacing.

H20skeefreek
12-05-2009, 01:52 PM
If you want to be safe stay in the boat.
That's a pretty idiotic statement.

Hollywood
12-07-2009, 10:07 AM
Hmm, I must have missed your post of safe slalom bindings.

LaRue
12-07-2009, 10:11 AM
I do not use a double boot, never have. Do we think it is the safest to be in a double boot?

i have been slalom skiing for 30 years and IMHO, i beleive a double boot is more a preference issue than a safety issue. I do not use a double boot and never had a serious injury.

mccobmd
12-07-2009, 03:45 PM
If you want to be safe stay in the boat.

It's all relative. In the boat is not any good if the lake is full of drunken jet ski drivers. Maybe safer is a better point to the bindings. Nothing is completely safe but I don't mind having probability on my side.

Hollywood
12-07-2009, 04:09 PM
Ok, what is your point? I am waiting for the list of safe slalom bindings.

mccobmd
12-07-2009, 04:39 PM
I don't have the answer to safe slalom bindings but I do know from a medical perspective if you fall you want either both on or both off. If one is off and the other stays on all the force is applied to a single leg which significantly increases the probability of injury. In regards to slalom bindings your recommendation is probably the only truly safe one.

airdrew99
12-09-2009, 04:49 PM
I love my Wiley bindings as well!!!

MC2000190
12-11-2009, 01:28 PM
Hollywood, I am looking for some good feedback, I/We don't need your smartass comments! If you don't have anything productive to say then stay out of it! We all know that it is dangerous, I am simply trying to gather data so I don't injure myself again!..... Thanks to all who had something productive to say, you helped me out.

Wacko
12-12-2009, 01:53 PM
Question, Will new bindings fit a HO Turbo from 1988? Or do I have to replace the plate?

corey
12-12-2009, 03:47 PM
Wacko,

You will have to redrill your ski to accept the new plate. It's pretty easy to do, in the summer we usually do this several times a month. The new plate uses a wider mounting pattern than your Turbo, remounting your plate onto the new binding doesnt work as the binding rubber covers a couple of the mounting holes.