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venetrex
11-05-2009, 07:41 AM
I have a 2007 X-2 that I got used in late fall of this year with the canadian blue flake exterior. The previous "KID" that owned it put 2 VERY deep gouges in the rear from the trailer guide poles. I saw on some site a repair kit for my color. Has anyone done this? I think even if I do a BAD job, I can only make it look better. Unsure of what to do about the clear coat over the flake. These CANNOT be wetsanded, all the way to black on one side.

H20skeefreek
11-05-2009, 07:53 AM
There is no clear coat over the gelcoat. I would take it to a person who is experienced in fixing metal flake.

JohnE
11-05-2009, 08:16 AM
I would 2nd the thought of taking it to someone with experience. A good gel guy will fix it so you never knew it was there. I know Chief from this forum had his repaired.

But there is clear over the flake, just not over the regular gelcoat is my understanding.

TMCNo1
11-05-2009, 09:03 AM
But there is clear over the flake, just not over the regular gelcoat is my understanding.

Correct, the clear gelcoat is first applied to the mold in the area of the metalflake color to give a protective layer to the metalflake, then backed by the metalflake color, then backed with black gelcoat, then the rest of the colored gelcoat is applied before the resin, fiberglass, braces, plates, etc. is applied to build the component.

Any repairs will entail, grinding the clear gelcoat down the the metalflake layer, repairing the metalflake portion, then clear gelcoat will have to be applied over the metalflake finish to match the existing. In most cases, not something the average backyard DIYer can do, compared to regular solid color gelcoat.

bigmac
11-05-2009, 10:33 AM
Correct, the clear gelcoat is first applied to the mold in the area of the metalflake color to give a protective layer to the metalflake, then backed by the metalflake color, then backed with black gelcoat, then the rest of the colored gelcoat is applied before the resin, fiberglass, braces, plates, etc. is applied to build the component.

Interesting. Does that mean that the total gelcoat thickness is greater if it's a metalflake color?

SkiDog
11-05-2009, 11:25 AM
I can tell you, and I'm SURE Chief will back this up, DO NOT let anybody repair it if the outside climate is below 60 degrees!

Witness140
11-05-2009, 11:59 AM
Surprised nobody has suggested this yet, but you should take it to a dealer. They have super powers and are the only people on this planet equipped to perform such a complicated task. No mere mortal on this forum could have possibly ever performed such a complex and involved task as working with flaked gelcoat!

Call your local dealer, I'm sure they'll get back to you by March, when it gets warm enough to do such a complicated job. Oh, but then they'll be so busy with spring openings and getting the marina going, they'll call you in mid July. Then, you'll miss that 1 week window, and be up against the winterization-fall closing season and have to bring it in the following March.

Oh, wait - you realize that right now you have an ugly mark on your boat that quite honestly, isn't hurting you. But sounds like if you can do anything to make it look better - even if not factory perfect - you might take that route. Ok, then here's some help.

http://www.bwbmag.com/output.cfm?id=1015381

DooSPX
11-05-2009, 01:05 PM
a good gel guy can make it look as good as new!

Witness140
11-05-2009, 02:40 PM
a good gel guy can make it look as good as new!

Yeah venetrex - take it to a dealer or a gel guy. Surprised nobody mentioned that idea.

JohnE
11-05-2009, 04:24 PM
Surprised nobody has suggested this yet, but you should take it to a dealer. They have super powers and are the only people on this planet equipped to perform such a complicated task. No mere mortal on this forum could have possibly ever performed such a complex and involved task as working with flaked gelcoat!

Call your local dealer, I'm sure they'll get back to you by March, when it gets warm enough to do such a complicated job. Oh, but then they'll be so busy with spring openings and getting the marina going, they'll call you in mid July. Then, you'll miss that 1 week window, and be up against the winterization-fall closing season and have to bring it in the following March.

Oh, wait - you realize that right now you have an ugly mark on your boat that quite honestly, isn't hurting you. But sounds like if you can do anything to make it look better - even if not factory perfect - you might take that route. Ok, then here's some help.

http://www.bwbmag.com/output.cfm?id=1015381


Let me try again. I imagine that without some experience that trying to fix your own gel would not be an improvement, might make it look worse. But if that happens you can always take it to a pro then. Note - I did not suggest a dealer. You know my thoughts on most of the MC dealers Jerry. With a few exceptions.

Jorski
11-05-2009, 04:55 PM
Most dealers (not all I am sure) will send the boat out to a gel expert in the area...might want to call your dealer and see who they recommend.

DooSPX
11-05-2009, 07:37 PM
Not all dealers out source it. Most who do not have the skill do. Im pretty sure BAWS does the work on the boat. I remember a boat that was in a accident and they would fixing it during the reunion.

cbryan70
11-05-2009, 08:06 PM
Surprised nobody has suggested this yet, but you should take it to a dealer. They have super powers and are the only people on this planet equipped to perform such a complicated task. No mere mortal on this forum could have possibly ever performed such a complex and involved task as working with flaked gelcoat!

Call your local dealer, I'm sure they'll get back to you by March, when it gets warm enough to do such a complicated job. Oh, but then they'll be so busy with spring openings and getting the marina going, they'll call you in mid July. Then, you'll miss that 1 week window, and be up against the winterization-fall closing season and have to bring it in the following March.

Oh, wait - you realize that right now you have an ugly mark on your boat that quite honestly, isn't hurting you. But sounds like if you can do anything to make it look better - even if not factory perfect - you might take that route. Ok, then here's some help.

http://www.bwbmag.com/output.cfm?id=1015381

I would go to places that sell bass boats over a MC dealership for metal flake.......

venetrex
11-05-2009, 10:35 PM
So NOONE has ever atempted to repair their own metal flake gelcoat????????? I guess I'll be the first. If you READ my first post I don't want the headache of taking it to the dealer. I reapired my tige wasted gelcoat to shine like new and it had many many scrathes and dings, etc. Just no metal flake. I guess that touch up for $43.00 on my mastercraft site is in order. Just got to make sure I heat up the boathouse. I take some photos when I have some daylight. The sad part is these scratches would NEVER have occured on my watch but thats why they are $30,000 scratches.

cbryan70
11-06-2009, 12:07 AM
So NOONE has ever atempted to repair their own metal flake gelcoat????????? I guess I'll be the first. If you READ my first post I don't want the headache of taking it to the dealer. I reapired my tige wasted gelcoat to shine like new and it had many many scrathes and dings, etc. Just no metal flake. I guess that touch up for $43.00 on my mastercraft site is in order. Just got to make sure I heat up the boathouse. I take some photos when I have some daylight. The sad part is these scratches would NEVER have occured on my watch but thats why they are $30,000 scratches.


Metal flake is VERY VERY VERY difficult to reproduce let alone get close.....this is why I recommended bring it to a ranger or some other bass dealership where they deal with this on a regular occasion.....what do I know I only sell um....

JohnE
11-06-2009, 09:14 AM
Metal flake is VERY VERY VERY difficult to reproduce let alone get close.....this is why I recommended bring it to a ranger or some other bass dealership where they deal with this on a regular occasion.....what do I know I only sell um....

Agreed. I wouldn't attempt fixing my own metalflake. I would attempt fixing my regular gel coat. Venetrex, I look forward to hearing how you make out. In case (gulp) I ever need to fix mine.....

TMCNo1
11-29-2009, 08:26 PM
Interesting. Does that mean that the total gelcoat thickness is greater if it's a metalflake color?

Sorry, this was the day and the post I was replying to when my computer locked up, but................

Yes, the total thickness in the area of the metalflake gelcoat will be thicker because of the multiple layers it takes to achieve the metalflake effect vs the one layer of just one color sprayed to spec thickness in the same area.

TEAL98
12-01-2009, 01:59 AM
Sorry, this was the day and the post I was replying to when my computer locked up, but................

Yes, the total thickness in the area of the metalflake gelcoat will be thicker because of the multiple layers it takes to achieve the metalflake effect vs the one layer of just one color sprayed to spec thickness in the same area.

Interesting

Skipper
12-01-2009, 09:57 AM
So NOONE has ever atempted to repair their own metal flake gelcoat????????? I guess I'll be the first. If you READ my first post I don't want the headache of taking it to the dealer. I reapired my tige wasted gelcoat to shine like new and it had many many scrathes and dings, etc. Just no metal flake. I guess that touch up for $43.00 on my mastercraft site is in order. Just got to make sure I heat up the boathouse. I take some photos when I have some daylight. The sad part is these scratches would NEVER have occured on my watch but thats why they are $30,000 scratches.


To repair that area:

1. Mask of the repair area and cover the entire boat
2. Grind the damaged area down to bare glass and bevel out the edge at least two inches
3. Use epoxy resin to bond over the exposed fiberglass
4. Sand with 250 grit sand paper, wash with soap and water, dry
5. Apply your metal flake gelcote but leave a little more than 1/16" inch from the repair to the finished surface
6. Apply clear gelocote to the finished level, cover with a thick (waxed) plastic film
7. Carefully smooth out the gelcote under the film and you will minimize sanding later
8. Once cured, remove the plastic
9. Use no less than 400 wet sand paper to blend the edges.
10. Follow in sequence with 600, 800, 1000, 1500, 2000 wet sanding
11. Buff with 3M buffing compound
12. Finish with 3m Finesse-it compound

If you carefully prepare the area, get a good match on the gelcote, and pay attention to detail you should get a very good repair.

DemolitionMan
12-01-2009, 12:04 PM
Metal flake is different animal. Be careful.

jipster43
12-10-2009, 10:05 PM
Make sure you document your misery, ugh... progress with pics. You're a more ambitious man than me!

JP :)