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View Full Version : First time winterizing my '98 190... few questions


TEAL98
10-13-2009, 06:03 PM
Ok, so I got to enjoy my boat for maybe a month and now it's time to break it down and winterize it. Coming into this site, I knew next to nothing about these boats (but plenty enough about GM powertrains). I'm going to try to keep this short and not write a whole story but here goes...

So I read alot about having to pump out the old motor oil to ensure everything drained. I figured I would take my chances and just ring off the brass fitting coming off the hose from the back of the engine, and in about an hour and a halfs' time, it stopped draining. I took off the old filter (that was tightened to no end!) and put on a new Delco PF454 filter. It ended up a hair over 5 quarts of Rotella T 15W40 non-synthetic (since thats what MC reccomends), so I was surprised even after running the motor for 10 minutes, and the oil was still golden in color.

With that being said, I still need to do the tranny fluid but guess I'll do that in the Spring if its not a necessity for the winterization process.

Basically, from what I understand, I need to dump some fuel stabilizer in it, and pull the boat from my backyard to the front afterwards so it'll slosh around in the tank . My tank is peaked full because personal family issues cancelled my last weekend of boating on my way to the lake. My question is are there any reccomendations for the Indmar 350 as for fuel stabilizer?

Ok, so once I pull the boat to the front, I'll hook up my water hose and run the motor to operating temperature. Pull the petcock on the block, and let the water drain. I heard something about exhaust manifolds and water being held in those as well. How do I go about draining the water from those? From my understanding, once all is drained, I should probably replace the petcocks with brass fittings, tighten up the one on the block and whatever I need to do with the exhaust manifolds, and it's time to run AF through. From my basic understanding from the information on here, I'll take another garden hose and hook it up to the same place as I would hook up my first hose that I use to run water through, and dump antifreeze in the hose, with it being held level (like being gravity fed), wait for it to fill, start the motor, let the antifreeze run through it while continuing to feed the hose with antifreeze, and let it run until I've got a good color spitting out the exhaust. With that being done(?), I'll take my plugs out one-by-one, and spray oil (doesn't have to be 15w40 i wouldnt think) into each and every single cylinder until i've got a good idea that all the walls are coated. Put the plugs back in, pull the coil wire off the distributor, let it crank 3-5 times, and thats it?!?! Winterization is done?!

I'd like to know if this is basically all I need to do, with the exception of my question about the exhaust manifolds. Also the impeller, where is it located and how would I go about replacing it, during my winterization process? Thanks alot fellas

~Jon

mayo93prostar
10-14-2009, 08:06 AM
look at this post with winterization checklist documents.

http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=103139&postcount=6

captain planet
10-19-2009, 03:49 PM
Don't forget about the knock sensor on the starboard side of the engine, take it out to remove water from the block. It is opposite the petcock. There are 2 plugs on the rear of your exhaust manifolds, take them out. There will be about a quart of water in there that needs to be removed. Take a coffee can to catch the water. You can get new brass 3/4 inch plugs at any hardware for about $4.50 each.

After I drain the water from each side of the block and the manifolds I put 3 gallons of anti-freeze in and that is enough. I have green coming out the back of the boat at that point.

east tx skier
10-19-2009, 04:10 PM
When you read that checklist linked above, if you have any questions about what I wrote, don't hesitate to PM me.

I use sta-bil for fuel stabilizer. Some people may have brand preferences and I wouldn't try to convince you that sta-bil is any better than a comparable product. But it's readily available and, as far as I can tell, does what it is supposed to do.

The impeller is inside the water pump. You access it by removing the 3 brass screws on the access plate on the front of your pump housing.

For antifreeze, you don't need to add water. I'd suggest adding the fuel stabilizer early so that it circulates during one of the several times you run your boat during the process. Once you've fogged the boat, you won't be running it anymore. At that point, drain the block and manifolds and remove the hoses to shake things out. If you aren't removing the impeller and plan to replace in the spring, pull the safety lanyard and crank to kick the water out of the pump housing.

If you are adding antifreeze after you drain the water, put the plugs back in and remove the hose that connect the water pump to the thermostat housing from the lower point (the pump end). Put a funnel in the hose and hold it as high above the tstate housing as you can. Pour RV or Sierra antifreeze into the funnel (between 1.5--2 gallons should do it). Reattach the hose.

TEAL98
10-20-2009, 10:01 PM
When you read that checklist linked above, if you have any questions about what I wrote, don't hesitate to PM me.

I use sta-bil for fuel stabilizer. Some people may have brand preferences and I wouldn't try to convince you that sta-bil is any better than a comparable product. But it's readily available and, as far as I can tell, does what it is supposed to do.

The impeller is inside the water pump. You access it by removing the 3 brass screws on the access plate on the front of your pump housing.

For antifreeze, you don't need to add water. I'd suggest adding the fuel stabilizer early so that it circulates during one of the several times you run your boat during the process. Once you've fogged the boat, you won't be running it anymore. At that point, drain the block and manifolds and remove the hoses to shake things out. If you aren't removing the impeller and plan to replace in the spring, pull the safety lanyard and crank to kick the water out of the pump housing.

If you are adding antifreeze after you drain the water, put the plugs back in and remove the hose that connect the water pump to the thermostat housing from the lower point (the pump end). Put a funnel in the hose and hold it as high above the tstate housing as you can. Pour RV or Sierra antifreeze into the funnel (between 1.5--2 gallons should do it). Reattach the hose.

Seems pretty cut and dry and easy to understand. I put a post up in the Engine/Drivetrain section that explains why my winterization was halted until this upcoming weekend. I freaked out cause my prop shaft was turning when I fired it up on the garden hose, and I didn't know what to do, turns out its not much to worry about it (as I have now learned, lol). So me and my buddy took the front leg mounts off the wakeboard tower and loosened the rear leg mounts at the brackets on the gunnel and laid it down so I could take it over to his garage to keep it warm until this weekend when I can take a WHOLE day to get dirty with it.

I'm HOPING that I will not have damaged anything by neglecting it for a whole week. I know it sat outside for 2 nights in a row with temps getting to a low of 38 and 39 and mid 40s during the day. My buddys garage stays a constant 45 degrees and is insulated, so I'm thinking (and praying) I'll be ok until Sunday. Heck its supposed to be in the 70s here in Northern Virginia for the rest of the week into the weekend. Almost makes me wana put it back in the lake for a day, but I can't be foolish at this point. Thanks for all the help Cap'n and Tex, I'm gunna bring my laptop over to my buddy's house on Sunday when I tear into it, hopefully I won't have any questions, but don't be surprised, I'm still pretty new at this...

~Jon

east tx skier
10-22-2009, 12:43 AM
Takes time at sub freezing temps to crack a block. You'll be fine.