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View Full Version : MCX - Antifreeze - Through which hose(s)?


OhioX14
10-10-2009, 10:03 PM
I used to winterize my Nautique (GT40) all the time myself but haven't done the MCX until this year. I did drain everything (knock sensors, exhaust manifolds (hose), heater core, etc. and pumped the heater core with antifeeze before reconnecting everything.

The question is which hose(s) do you pour antifreeze through? I disconnected the two hoses that lead from the thermostat housing to the top of each exhaust manifold (I disconnected from the exhaust manifold side) and poured the antifreeze through them. I'm concerned that it's getting down into the block to all the areas it needs to be. I prefer this method over sucking it in as I'm concerned about the thermostat being closed with that method.

Thoughts? Advise?

Thanks in advance!

JimN
10-10-2009, 11:08 PM
I used to winterize my Nautique (GT40) all the time myself but haven't done the MCX until this year. I did drain everything (knock sensors, exhaust manifolds (hose), heater core, etc. and pumped the heater core with antifeeze before reconnecting everything.

The question is which hose(s) do you pour antifreeze through? I disconnected the two hoses that lead from the thermostat housing to the top of each exhaust manifold (I disconnected from the exhaust manifold side) and poured the antifreeze through them. I'm concerned that it's getting down into the block to all the areas it needs to be. I prefer this method over sucking it in as I'm concerned about the thermostat being closed with that method.

Thoughts? Advise?

Thanks in advance!

What kind of anti-freeze are you using?

OhioX14
10-10-2009, 11:13 PM
-100 from West Marine

TMCNo1
10-11-2009, 09:10 AM
-100 from West Marine


If you've run the boat and brought it up to operating temps, then the thermostat should be open and drawing it in then should not be a problem.

OhioX14
10-11-2009, 08:08 PM
If you've run the boat and brought it up to operating temps, then the thermostat should be open and drawing it in then should not be a problem.

With all due respect wouldn't this be a race against time? If you take the time to drain the block and exhaust manifolds wouldn't that give the thermostat plenty of time to cool down and close? And if you drain and change the oil at this point (which is ususally half or most of the reason for bringing the engine up to temp anyway) then the time taken would certinally give the thermostat plenty of time to close.

I believe I would rather pull a hose or two and pour antifreeze into the block to ensure it gets where it needs to go. It may take a little more effort but it seems safer to me.

Just my thoughts anyway.

TMCNo1
10-11-2009, 08:24 PM
With all due respect wouldn't this be a race against time? If you take the time to drain the block and exhaust manifolds wouldn't that give the thermostat plenty of time to cool down and close? And if you drain and change the oil at this point (which is ususally half or most of the reason for bringing the engine up to temp anyway) then the time taken would certinally give the thermostat plenty of time to close.

I believe I would rather pull a hose or two and pour antifreeze into the block to ensure it gets where it needs to go. It may take a little more effort but it seems safer to me.

Just my thoughts anyway.


If you are going to suck up -50 to -100 antifreeze into the engine through the raw water pump, then there is no reason to drain all the water out of everything to start with.
After it's brought up to operating temps, change the oil/filter, run it again till it's up to temps again, then suck up at least a 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water (-20) in a 5 gal. bucket and by the time the bucket is empty, you've run at least 2 gallons or more out the exhaust and you should be covered with the remaining 50/50 mix (-20) throughout the engine and exhaust manifolds. And, if you catch the expelled mix from the exhaust, you can reuse it again next year with the addition of a little 100% antifreeze to bring it back to -20 protection after it's been diluted with the original engine water by checking it with a little cheap antifreeze checker from most any auto parts place.

OhioX14
10-11-2009, 08:55 PM
If you are going to suck up -50 to -100 antifreeze into the engine through the raw water pump, then there is no reason to drain all the water out of everything to start with.
After it's brought up to operating temps, change the oil/filter, run it again till it's up to temps again, then suck up at least a 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water (-20) in a 5 gal. bucket and by the time the bucket is empty, you've run at least 2 gallons or more out the exhaust and you should be covered with the remaining 50/50 mix (-20) throughout the engine and exhaust manifolds. And, if you catch the expelled mix from the exhaust, you can reuse it again next year with the addition of a little 100% antifreeze to bring it back to -20 protection after it's been diluted with the original engine water by checking it with a little cheap antifreeze checker from most any auto parts place.


Sounds good. Proof once again that there are a multitude of different methods for winterizing. For my comfort level I think I'll stick with draining and filling. It just gives me more peace of mind knowing that I have removed the water making the concentration of antifreeze much higher. If I lived in Tennessee or points further south I might go with your method but it can get mighty cold up here some winters.

deminimis
10-11-2009, 11:52 PM
You can unhook the heater hose at the facet looking valve. Hook up a heater hose to the valve with a funnel on the end of the hose. Fill with antifreeze.. That's how I did it after draining everything. Overkill, and only fills the engine with antifreeze, but provides rust protection in the engine while stored.

TOO-TALL
10-12-2009, 12:40 AM
With all due respect wouldn't this be a race against time? If you take the time to drain the block and exhaust manifolds wouldn't that give the thermostat plenty of time to cool down and close?


I have thought the same thing the last few years.
I start the engine get it up to operatin temp then drain the block,Manifold and the heater.
Then put the raw water pump hose in a 5 gal bucket of antifreeze then start the boat and you can see the operating temp whent way down.
Do you think the temp will get low enough to close the thermostat?

I've don it this way for the last few years with no problems.

Jerseydave
10-12-2009, 09:03 AM
I have thought the same thing the last few years.
I start the engine get it up to operatin temp then drain the block,Manifold and the heater.
Then put the raw water pump hose in a 5 gal bucket of antifreeze then start the boat and you can see the operating temp whent way down.
Do you think the temp will get low enough to close the thermostat?

I've don it this way for the last few years with no problems.

I do it this way as well. I figure some of that anti freeze gets into the block, hoses, manifolds. Plus after draining 95% of the water out it's just one step better than just draining everything and leaving the system open...possibly allowing rust and corrosion to happen. No problems after many years of doing it this way, and we get down into the single digits some winter nights here in NJ.

If you really insist on pouring a/f into the engine, remove the t-stat housing and fill the engine from there.

TEAL98
11-05-2009, 09:48 PM
If you really insist on pouring a/f into the engine, remove the t-stat housing and fill the engine from there.

I was just about to say, that's what I planned on doing when I resume my winterization process this weekend. Since I've got a very SKIM amount of water still sitting in my intake, I figured I would just pour it in from there, and as I'm re-connecting hoses, fill those with AF as well. I bought 6 gallons of AF, and plan to run an extension hose from the raw water pump to the back of the boat where I will have two 5 gallon bucket sittin beneath the transom where the exhaust will be spittin' out antifreeze so I can just keep re-circulating while the engine temp warms up enough to operating temperature. That way I have no questions about whether or not the tstat opened or not. Sounds like a good idea to me:confused:

Chicago190
11-05-2009, 10:18 PM
I was just about to say, that's what I planned on doing when I resume my winterization process this weekend. Since I've got a very SKIM amount of water still sitting in my intake, I figured I would just pour it in from there, and as I'm re-connecting hoses, fill those with AF as well. I bought 6 gallons of AF, and plan to run an extension hose from the raw water pump to the back of the boat where I will have two 5 gallon bucket sittin beneath the transom where the exhaust will be spittin' out antifreeze so I can just keep re-circulating while the engine temp warms up enough to operating temperature. That way I have no questions about whether or not the tstat opened or not. Sounds like a good idea to me:confused:

You're going to need more than 6 gallons of anti-freeze to pull this plan off, and you'll have to do a T to get antifreeze from both buckets. You're over-thinking this. Pull the thermostat out, suck in the antifreeze, and call it a day. Reinstall the thermostat in the spring and hit the water.

TEAL98
11-05-2009, 11:52 PM
Pull the Tstat, start the motor, pour AF into raw water intake hose until AF spits out the exhaust, and 5 gallons should do it, right?:D Seriously though, that's all there is to it now, right?:o

JohnE
11-06-2009, 08:36 AM
I take the J hose off the thermostat housing and fill with antifreeze until it comes out the t stat housing on my MCX. Takes about 2.5 gallons. That's how Joe at MC of Charlotte recommended I do it when I bought my first boat from them.

Chicago190
11-06-2009, 10:22 AM
Pull the Tstat, start the motor, pour AF into raw water intake hose until AF spits out the exhaust, and 5 gallons should do it, right?:D Seriously though, that's all there is to it now, right?:o

That would probably work, although its easier to use a 5 gallon bucket. I'd be worried about spilling everywhere and your engine will suck up 5 gallons faster than you can pour it. It only takes about 60 seconds of running to drain a 5 gallon bucket dry.

mcskier
11-09-2009, 04:44 PM
You can unhook the heater hose at the facet looking valve. Hook up a heater hose to the valve with a funnel on the end of the hose. Fill with antifreeze.. That's how I did it after draining everything. Overkill, and only fills the engine with antifreeze, but provides rust protection in the engine while stored.

This is how I did it too. You know you've filled it when antifreeze starts dripping out the fresh water intake on the hull. It took me about 3.5 gallons to fill my MCX.

But here is a question...
What do most people use to recapture the flushed-out antifreeze in the spring? Do folks have any special technique other than holding a 5 gallon bucket under the manifold drain hoses? Then there's the draining at the knock sensors... That sounds messy.

Am I over thinking?

JimN
11-09-2009, 05:11 PM
This is how I did it too. You know you've filled it when antifreeze starts dripping out the fresh water intake on the hull. It took me about 3.5 gallons to fill my MCX.

But here is a question...
What do most people use to recapture the flushed-out antifreeze in the spring? Do folks have any special technique other than holding a 5 gallon bucket under the manifold drain hoses? Then there's the draining at the knock sensors... That sounds messy.

Am I over thinking?

What kind are you using? If it's regular car anti-freeze, go get the RV type- it's illegal to introduce the car stuff to any waterway. Just saying. If your hull has a plug at the rear or some other place where you could drain it from, you can let it go into the bilge and let it fall into a large bucket. Then, flush the bilge with clean water.

mcskier
11-09-2009, 06:04 PM
I used Sierra (green)...

Draining into the bilge was what I was going to do, but I was just curious if anyone on here had any slick techniques that make the process cleaner/simpler.

east tx skier
11-09-2009, 07:03 PM
Just drain and replug, then pull the hose that goes to the tstat housing and pour it in (hold the hose high). Takes about 1.5 gallons on my motor. Not a long process at all.

deminimis
11-09-2009, 07:15 PM
This all makes me want to go to closed cooling. Well, that and the fact there were some spectacular days out on the river I missed because they arrived after I winterized.

JohnE
11-09-2009, 07:38 PM
This all makes me want to go to closed cooling. Well, that and the fact there were some spectacular days out on the river I missed because they arrived after I winterized.

Winterizing is so quick and easy that I'd take it out for a nice day and winterize again if the opportunity arose.