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View Full Version : Beware Petcock on block - Winterizing Tip


gsh748
09-08-2009, 09:21 PM
To All,

Just winterized my 205 V opened the petcock and water came out on the one side to drain the block. Something in the back of my head said that I should remove the whole 3/4 inch brass fitting just to be safe, water gushed out of the opening. The petcock was glogged with rusty particles which did not allow the water to come out. I am going to remove the petcock for good and only have a brass fitting which will need to be removed during winterizing to be safe. This could have been a very costly mistake living in wisconsin.

If anyone has any other information / suggestions on winterizing a 205 V or a check list, please let me know.

G

east tx skier
09-08-2009, 10:08 PM
Welcome. Here's a checklist that should help.

Link (http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=103139&postcount=6)

Good call on not trusting the petcocks. Where you can, i.e., not on the knock sensor, replace those petcocks with brass plugs. 1/4" on the block, 3/4" on the mainfolds. Much easier to get at with a socket or box wrench.

rholmes
09-09-2009, 10:08 AM
Do you know how many threads per inch?

east tx skier
09-09-2009, 12:25 PM
Do you know how many threads per inch?

No. I just picked up brass 1/4" or 3/4" NPT plugs at Napa.

88 PS190
09-24-2009, 12:52 PM
I never pull my petcocks, but after the water stops flowing I fill my block with rv antifreeze until it flows out, and I always see a good stream out of the petcocks, it will hit the carpet if I don't deflect it.

87MCProstar
09-24-2009, 01:46 PM
I never open the petcocks, I just flow rv antifreeze through until it comes out exhaust. Should I be doing petcocks too?

mayo93prostar
09-24-2009, 01:59 PM
87, One theory to reduce amount of AF needed, drain block after warming up, close, then run AF in. Otherwise you need to flush all that water out. I actually fog my engine after warming up, then drain block, and fill AF by removing the hose from the output of the raw water pump, rotating it upwards and pour 2 gallons of pink RV AF in. Mine is kept in an unheated garage but I do NOT live in Minnesota.

dazarov
09-25-2009, 09:24 AM
I am a newbie winterizing my 89 Tristar for the first time. I have spent hours on this site reviewing the checklists, supply lists, oil recommendations, etc. Great stuff - Thanks.

I live in Michigan and my boat will be in sub-zero temps, so I want to ensure I do this right and even after all of my reading I still have a couple of questions:

1) What is considered the best way to circulate the anti-freeze through the engine? My plan was to get the boat warm and then fill a 5 gallon bucket with anti-freeze and run the boat until it is all used up fogging the engine at the end, is that acceptable or is there a better way?

2) What type of Anti-freeze is recommended for my engine?

Thanks for your help with these questions and all of the other great info on this site.

JimN
09-25-2009, 09:40 AM
To All,

Just winterized my 205 V opened the petcock and water came out on the one side to drain the block. Something in the back of my head said that I should remove the whole 3/4 inch brass fitting just to be safe, water gushed out of the opening. The petcock was glogged with rusty particles which did not allow the water to come out. I am going to remove the petcock for good and only have a brass fitting which will need to be removed during winterizing to be safe. This could have been a very costly mistake living in wisconsin.

If anyone has any other information / suggestions on winterizing a 205 V or a check list, please let me know.

G

If you have read many of the threads on winterizing, you will have seen me recommend replacing the petcocks with a brass plug. When a motor gets its coolant from raw water, a petcock is the last thing that should be used. GM ships them with it, Indmar leaves it in and so does MC and the rest of the boat manufacturers. I think someone should make the first move to replace them before the boat is sold.

FYI- just living in Wisconsin is a costly mistake.:mad::mad:

dazarov
09-27-2009, 09:54 PM
Please share your thoughts on my two questions. Thanks

I am a newbie winterizing my 89 Tristar for the first time. I have spent hours on this site reviewing the checklists, supply lists, oil recommendations, etc. Great stuff - Thanks.

I live in Michigan and my boat will be in sub-zero temps, so I want to ensure I do this right and even after all of my reading I still have a couple of questions:

1) What is considered the best way to circulate the anti-freeze through the engine? My plan was to get the boat warm and then fill a 5 gallon bucket with anti-freeze and run the boat until it is all used up fogging the engine at the end, is that acceptable or is there a better way?

2) What type of Anti-freeze is recommended for my engine?

Thanks for your help with these questions and all of the other great info on this site.

JimN
09-27-2009, 10:35 PM
Please share your thoughts on my two questions. Thanks

I have always sucked it in through the raw water system with the hose connected to the hull side of the oil cooler. That way, you don't need to drain that, either. Honestly, I would look in the FAQ section- some pretty lengthy discussion has taken place about this and it might be more concise for you to find the lists and print out the one that applies.

Do you hang out with many other boaters? If you do, I would look into buying oil and anti-freeze in larger quantity. Same with filters and other chemicals. If you hang out with a lot of boaters who have ski boats and small to medium sized cruisers and runabouts, consider buying a plastic watering trough and a barrel of anti-freeze. If you can find a scrap of conveyor belt, that can be attached to the trough to keep the spraying fluids from going all over the ground and wasting it. That way, you can actually run the motor with only anti-freeze in it, instead of having to worry about whether it got into all of the motor, or not. Once you see the temperature change, it's time to fog it. Using some method of checking the burst temperature is needed and refractometers are available for that.

You'll need to do all of the other winterizing too, but if you can run it on only anti-freeze, it's faster, easier and works better. Draining the water out first keeps it from becoming diluted too fast.

RV anti-freeze only. -100F is what I would use but what you can get locally will determine what you use. Buying it in gallon jugs is OK but the cost/gallon drops when you buy in larger quantities. What isn't used one year can be kept sealed air tight and used the next year.

1redTA
10-07-2009, 09:44 PM
I winterized my boat ( first time for me) and the petcocks broke on the tranny cooler and the cast 180 piece next to the water pump. I filled the block with rv antifreeze most of two gallons and was looking for the zinc on this boat. Are there any zinc plates on the 1981 models? Forgive my ignorance all the boats around mobile had them

JimN
10-07-2009, 10:59 PM
I winterized my boat ( first time for me) and the petcocks broke on the tranny cooler and the cast 180 piece next to the water pump. I filled the block with rv antifreeze most of two gallons and was looking for the zinc on this boat. Are there any zinc plates on the 1981 models? Forgive my ignorance all the boats around mobile had them

These don't have zinc anodes. Aluminum erodes due to galvanic action, so the zinc is used as a sacrificial metal to preserve the gear cases of a stern drive or outboard motor.

I would replace any petcocks with brass plugs from a hardware store. It's nothing special, doesn't need to be a marine or automotive part.

JUST-IN-TIME
10-09-2009, 03:19 AM
also remember the v-drive drain guys!!!