PDA

View Full Version : Oil Filter Relocation Kit


kylegansel
08-24-2009, 11:33 AM
In small talk with one of my nautique buddies he told me you can get oil filter relocation kits. We have a 2003 X-9 350 MCX and changing the oil is a major pain in the butt since we have to change the oil at least twice a season with all the hours we rack up. Does anyone know if this is possible and where I can get one? I searched a few threads and didn't really see anything. I wish mastercraft would put them up high somewhere and not underneath the block. What a pain!!!!

TMCNo1
08-24-2009, 11:35 AM
Using, TMC Search by Goo (http://www.google.com/coop/cse?cx=005775850323706454504:8-nmuizykqo)gle (http://www.google.com/coop/cse?cx=005775850323706454504:8-nmuizykqo), using the key words "remote oil filter", you find these threads on the subject , http://www.google.com/cse?cx=005775850323706454504%3A8-nmuizykqo&ie=UTF-8&q=remote+oil+filter&sa=Search

Summit Racing is just one place that carries the kits, http://www.summitracing.com/search/?keyword=remote%20oil%20filter%20kits&dds=1

Jesus_Freak
08-26-2009, 01:31 PM
In small talk with one of my nautique buddies he told me you can get oil filter relocation kits. We have a 2003 X-9 350 MCX and changing the oil is a major pain in the butt since we have to change the oil at least twice a season with all the hours we rack up. Does anyone know if this is possible and where I can get one? I searched a few threads and didn't really see anything. I wish mastercraft would put them up high somewhere and not underneath the block. What a pain!!!!

I put one on a Nissan Sentra (not quite what you asked about :o) that I bought from JC Witney. On many little rice patties, the filter is just under the intake manifold on the firewall-side of the engine = pain in the ear. I had to supply the stainless tubing to make the connections. I mounted the filter upside down and added a valved drain line. Man, it makes things easier.

babymoore3
08-28-2009, 08:50 PM
Just be careful that you are not excessively restrictive. Remote locating the filter can drop the oil pressure at the bearings, sometimes significantly. Obviously, this is not good for the life of the engine.

In your lines do not use lots of hard turning fittings (hard 90s especially), use sweeping fittings - they cost more but are worth it for extra psi. From Hotrod.com, a SuperFlow fuel line discussion, "A forged (or drilled) 90-degree fitting has a flow restriction equivalent to a piece of hose 57 times the i.d. of the fitting."

Another suggestion would be a Reverso or similar pump installed with a line to the oil pan and one that can be routed out of the boat and leave the filter to change every other time. They can run high for price but are very quick.

Another thought would be to take oil samples and send to a machinery dealer. Many diesel engine (maybe even automotive dealers) can tell you all about the condition of the oil and you may be able to extend the intervals some. Two things kill engines - acid and debris from combustion. Obviously, don't do this if you are under warranty...right?

http://www.reversopumps.com/impeller_pumps.php

Hope that helps...

Jerseydave
08-28-2009, 09:22 PM
Moroso makes one

http://www.moroso.com/catalog/categorydisplay.asp?catcode=21001

Milodon makes one too

http://www.milodon.com/oil-system/remote-oil-filter-kits.asp

I'm not sure if either is recommended for marine use. I change my oil twice a year too, once in July and once at the end of the season (october) on my MCX. It's easy and not messy if you use a large ziplock bag, put it around the filter after you start to loosen it. Spin the filter off the rest of the way by hand and let the bag catch the filter as it comes off. I never spill any oil this way.

Jesus_Freak
08-31-2009, 01:46 PM
...From Hotrod.com, a SuperFlow fuel line discussion, "A forged (or drilled) 90-degree fitting has a flow restriction equivalent to a piece of hose 57 times the i.d. of the fitting."...

Hate to debate such a nice guy, and I didnt read the article....but....The "equivalent length" method of equating a restriction to a length of given ID is certainly a proven and widely-used engineering practice. It is derived from the Bernoulli approach for inviscid flows, i.e. turbulent. The problem is that oil flowing in tubing is likely laminar. With a viscosity of water (low estimate, even for high temperature motor oil) and a speed of a foot/second in 1/4" tubing, the Reynolds number is still well below transition. That means that the equivalent length is no more than the fluid travel length inside the elbow. For a short-radius elbow, this is, on average, about 0.5*ID. A "forged" elbow may be have a different travel distance than a normal short-radius elbow, but could not possibly be more than 1.0*ID in laminar flow.