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View Full Version : Engine Recalibration on a 2003 MasterCraft


stmariesman
07-11-2009, 01:45 AM
I have a 2003 ProStar 209 and was told by my local MasterCraft dealer that I need to have the engine recalibrated every 3 to 4 years. Is this true?....It sounds like a scam if you ask me...but you never know.....Thanks....

Jim@BAWS
07-11-2009, 11:53 AM
SOUNDS LIKE A NEW SALES PITCH TO ME...I am on it

Jim@BAWS

bigmac
07-11-2009, 01:20 PM
I wonder how you "recalibrate" an Indmar engine:rolleyes:. Are they talking about custom remappping of the ECM? Beyond the usual tune-up procedures and schedule recommended by Indmar, sounds like BS to me

kyis
07-11-2009, 02:05 PM
Most computer controlled engines calibrate (air fuel ratio and timing curves) as you run them, thus if you disconnect the battery it may take a while to "calibrate" itself again. It picks up lean and rich spots and evens them out so the next time you hit that range or part of power band it will be ready. Same applies to idle, but that applies pretty quick. I would ask what they are going to recalibrate to make sure it is BS.

JimN
07-11-2009, 02:10 PM
I wonder how you "recalibrate" an Indmar engine:rolleyes:. Are they talking about custom remappping of the ECM? Beyond the usual tune-up procedures and schedule recommended by Indmar, sounds like BS to me

You need to connect it to a computer with the correct software and cable, clear the old program and install the new. The only reasons this was needed in the past is when known issues came up and needed to be corrected. In some cases (very limited), specific use programs were developed but not too often.

JimN
07-11-2009, 02:17 PM
Most computer controlled engines calibrate (air fuel ratio and timing curves) as you run them, thus if you disconnect the battery it may take a while to "calibrate" itself again. It picks up lean and rich spots and evens them out so the next time you hit that range or part of power band it will be ready. Same applies to idle, but that applies pretty quick. I would ask what they are going to recalibrate to make sure it is BS.

Recalibrate isn't an ongoing thing- it's removing one program and installing a new one. As far as lean/rich spots- the motors with O2 and catalytic do some of that but it's all built into the program. The older ones only listen for knock and pull timing advance back to a preset point if it occurs. Once the minimum is reached, it's done. As far as idle, they just vary the advance a bit (that's why the timing mark moves when the motor isn't in service mode) and open/close the IAC to smooth it out. The general fuel mapping takes care of everything, based on temperature, load and RPM.

It's not rocket surgery.

JimN
07-11-2009, 02:20 PM
I have a 2003 ProStar 209 and was told by my local MasterCraft dealer that I need to have the engine recalibrated every 3 to 4 years. Is this true?....It sounds like a scam if you ask me...but you never know.....Thanks....

I would ask them to tell you exactly what they would be doing. If they hesitate or refuse, walk away and ask MC if this is needed. As I mentioned, if a known issue exists, fine but they should send some kind of letter to inform boat owners of this. As seen in the past, requiring the dealers to inform boat owners of recalls and bulletins has been a huge failure.

bigmac
07-11-2009, 02:20 PM
You need to connect it to a computer with the correct software and cable, clear the old program and install the new. The only reasons this was needed in the past is when known issues came up and needed to be corrected. In some cases (very limited), specific use programs were developed but not too often.

Yeh, been doing that for years on my Harley, first with PowerCommander, now with the HD Race Tuner. I do note that the ECM on my bike is the same as the ECM on my boat. Haven't tried hooking it up to the boat to "recalibrate", but doubt it would work, doubt it would be helpful, and I doubt I'm smarter than the Indmar engineers that wrote the map in the first place, even if I could get in (Indmar says it's encrypted). There is the Scan and Tune tool (http://www.obd2allinone.com/sc/toplevel.asp?cat=32), but I don't know if that's available for MEFI-5 and I can't imagine it would be a worthwhile outlay of $600. That amount of money would probably buy a lot of "recalibration" from stmariesman's MasterCraft dealer :rolleyes:.

JimN
07-11-2009, 02:46 PM
Yeh, been doing that for years on my Harley, first with PowerCommander, now with the HD Race Tuner. I do note that the ECM on my bike is the same as the ECM on my boat. Haven't tried hooking it up to the boat to "recalibrate", but doubt it would work, doubt it would be helpful, and I doubt I'm smarter than the Indmar engineers that wrote the map in the first place, even if I could get in (Indmar says it's encrypted). There is the Scan and Tune tool (http://www.obd2allinone.com/sc/toplevel.asp?cat=32), but I don't know if that's available for MEFI-5 and I can't imagine it would be a worthwhile outlay of $600. That amount of money would probably buy a lot of "recalibration" from stmariesman's MasterCraft dealer :rolleyes:.

The people who did a lot of the original MC cal programs did the early Harley cals, too and his shop is where the Harley techs were initially taught.

bigmac
07-11-2009, 02:56 PM
It seems to me that calibrating a boat, or "recalibrating" a boat, would be harder than doing the same to a bike since putting a bike on a dyno is likely to be more meaningful than putting a boat on a dyno. In the case of a boat, the amount of drag is going to be more variable, especially relative to hull design. IMHO, "recalibrating" my Harley was mandatory since the base A/F ratio from the factory was ridiculously lean in their attempt to meet EPA requirements with an open loop EFI system. It's better now that they, like Indmar, have gone closed-loop and are using MEFI-5, and I suspect that if I had a newer bike, I wouldn't be bothering with the SERT.

JimN
07-11-2009, 03:33 PM
It seems to me that calibrating a boat, or "recalibrating" a boat, would be harder than doing the same to a bike since putting a bike on a dyno is likely to be more meaningful than putting a boat on a dyno. In the case of a boat, the amount of drag is going to be more variable, especially relative to hull design. IMHO, "recalibrating" my Harley was mandatory since the base A/F ratio from the factory was ridiculously lean in their attempt to meet EPA requirements with an open loop EFI system. It's better now that they, like Indmar, have gone closed-loop and are using MEFI-5, and I suspect that if I had a newer bike, I wouldn't be bothering with the SERT.

They do the initial setup on the dyno and then take the boats out to look for what's happening, so other than actual HP/torque output, the in-cylinder temperatures, emissions, fuel/timing demands, etc are viewed. We went to training in late '00 and The Legend towed his boat down there. When we had down time from classes, we went to the shop and installed an Intake Air Temperature sensor and when time allowed, one of the techs from the shop came for Will and they took the boat out to acquire data. They make some changes and it ended up with a better hole shot, better top end and better fuel consumption which was what he wanted, since he did a lot of wakeboarding and had been going through a tank of gas every day.

I had heard that Harleys were running awfully lean and as usual, the EPA knows best so if motors had been scattering all over, I'm sure the EPA wouldn't have seen how they could have caused it. I want clean air as much as anyone else but they don't seem to understand that in order for a motor to do its job and be durable, the air/fuel mixture needs to be in a certain range.

stmariesman
07-15-2009, 03:48 AM
Thanks guys, I called Indmar and they said I don't need to unless I have a major engine issue. They also asked me for the name of the dealership that said this so they could clue them on why doing this is not required....

JimN
07-15-2009, 09:41 AM
Thanks guys, I called Indmar and they said I don't need to unless I have a major engine issue. They also asked me for the name of the dealership that said this so they could clue them on why doing this is not required....

I bet someone at the dealership is in for an uncomfortable meeting. I sure wouldn't want a call from Indmar or MC tuning me up for trying to sell something that's not needed.

Jesus_Freak
07-20-2009, 01:42 PM
It seems like the OP question has been answered, but this thread reminded me of something I had been through in case it would be of any value to anyone:

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=13231

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=17522

JimN
07-20-2009, 05:36 PM
It seems like the OP question has been answered, but this thread reminded me of something I had been through in case it would be of any value to anyone:

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=13231

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=17522

Re: your comment about air temperature in the second link- It's not a factor on the older motors and I don't know if they use it now. If they put an IAT in, you should see a wire to it somewhere near the inlet of the throttle body. We installed one in the aluminum plate below the flame arrestor on The Legend's boat in late '00 when we were at MC training and one of the techs from the shop went out with him so they could look at the data and come up with a good program.