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jnbluther
05-13-2009, 08:23 PM
I bought a 1977 MC Stars and Stripes.

We have restoration work planned, done some things, and want to keep the practical as first priority.

The former owner rearranged / rewelded the boat crank configuration.

The problem: The boats crank hook hits the keel cradle and stops. We must lift the hull at the front to allow the boat's crank hook to clear at launch and load.

I own a design / build custom homebuilding business, develop land and own heavy equipment. I started as a frame carpenter in 1972, and with all this experience could figure something out, but in an abundance of counselors....there is wisdom.

I have attached a pic of our boat: Brown and Tan TX 7859 AW
A pic of a white and blue 77 Stars and Stripes crank configuration as an example.
A pic of Shepard's boat crank configuration from his restoration thread.

What should I do?

TMCNo1
05-13-2009, 08:35 PM
First, the first picture with the bow eye above the Y block is a mess and is all wrong, but if you are going to opt to rework it, go ahead and rework it like the pic of Shepard's boat crank configuration from his restoration thread. That's the same as I did in 1997 on our trailer refurb.
47425

jnbluther
05-13-2009, 09:10 PM
TMCCMN1 and the first to respond each time I post a question. THANKS.

I am sure there is info here somewhere on the forum, but what about "Y" blocks vendors. The top one of Yours, and Shepard's seem to split for the bow eye.

Crank Hook = Bow Eye

Keel Cradle = Y Block

hmmmmmmm...I am learning things I did not have to worry about as a tennager when dad took care of the boat.

TMCNo1
05-13-2009, 09:30 PM
TMCCMN1 and the first to respond each time I post a question. THANKS.

I am sure there is info here somewhere on the forum, but what about "Y" blocks vendors. The top one of Yours, and Shepard's seem to split for the bow eye.

Crank Hook = Bow Eye

Keel Cradle = Y Block

hmmmmmmm...I am learning things I did not have to worry about as a tennager when dad took care of the boat.


It is called the Boat Buddy II and requires a long bow eye to work and is/has been used on MC boats and others since 1990 as standard equipment on most all but the largest boats and their trailers.

Here is the product, http://kodiaktrailer.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=1&products_id=142&osCsid=5eef2b6660e36e08707cb7d7cde13b9f
and http://kodiaktrailer.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=1&products_id=148&osCsid=5eef2b6660e36e08707cb7d7cde13b9f

Here is some info and a similar tutorial on the conversion, http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=425858&postcount=48 you will probably have to make adjustments to the dimensions for your pre 1987 MC.
and http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=112627&postcount=17

Chicago190
05-13-2009, 09:31 PM
TMCCMN1 and the first to respond each time I post a question. THANKS.

I am sure there is info here somewhere on the forum, but what about "Y" blocks vendors. The top one of Yours, and Shepard's seem to split for the bow eye.

Crank Hook = Bow Eye

Keel Cradle = Y Block

hmmmmmmm...I am learning things I did not have to worry about as a tennager when dad took care of the boat.

Actually your "keel cradle" is known as the V-Block. Harold, I believe, is calling the Y-Block the structure consisting of the winch and Boat Buddy. You are confusing the Boat Buddy with your keel cradle, but the equivalent of your keel cradle is the carpeted V structure much lower on the keel in Shep's picture. Many trailers will have a roller instead of a Boat Buddy (see picture below). The Boat Buddy is included on newer MasterCraft trailers to allow quick loading and unloading with 2 people.

At least I think that is what Harold was saying.

flipper
05-13-2009, 09:32 PM
That's a boat buddy, not just a Y block. You'll have to do some work to install one on your trailer, but not hard to do. I did it on mine, and yes it is V shaped so the bow eye goes through it. Also it doesn't look like your trailer supports the bow much at all underneath. You may want to put something under it like you can see on the blue ss.