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meg
05-11-2009, 01:51 PM
With alot of people getting in and out of the water my boats tends to have some water in the hull-not anything abnormal. I have been removing the center drain plug after each use but was wondering if that was such a good idea i.e. wear and tear on the threads causing future leakage problems!!! 2006 x30

coz
05-11-2009, 02:02 PM
With alot of people getting in and out of the water my boats tends to have some water in the hull-not anything abnormal. I have been removing the center drain plug after each use but was wondering if that was such a good idea i.e. wear and tear on the threads causing future leakage problems!!! 2006 x30

Take it out every time and make sure it's back in before you leave the house. If you damage the threads it's because you cross threaded it. Just remember righty tighty, lefty loosy 8p :D

flipper
05-11-2009, 02:06 PM
Take mine out every time I pull the boat out, never had a problem

Gonzo
05-11-2009, 02:10 PM
Take mine out every time I pull the boat out, never had a problem

Ditto...,,,,,,,,,,,.

babymoore3
06-11-2009, 08:40 PM
Generally all plugs are pipe threads, unless you use power tools or are he-man (she-ra, spelling?) the plug should always seal sufficiently. If you need to reaplce the T handle plug skidim has new ones available.

Kingsley X-1
06-11-2009, 09:23 PM
Take it out every time and make sure it's back in before you leave the house.

that is the best recommendation i have heard all day!!!

vision
06-11-2009, 11:13 PM
If you have the newer plastic center drain plug BE CAREFUL. It is quite easy to cross thread the plastic plugs and even cross thread the sleeve in the hull. Yes, take it out after every use, but gently place it back in.

Gamble
06-12-2009, 10:38 AM
that is the best recommendation i have heard all day!!!

.........now that's funny!!!

kawagaskier
06-12-2009, 11:13 AM
1490hrs on the '85 and take mine out every time the boat leaves the water. Threads and plug are still like new.

vision
06-12-2009, 06:32 PM
1490hrs on the '85 and take mine out every time the boat leaves the water. Threads and plug are still like new.

The advantage of the old brass plugs!

Sodar
06-12-2009, 06:57 PM
The plastic plug is more difficult to thread than the old brass style. I was not paying attention and talking to people as I was putting the plug in last year and it turned out to not be threaded at all. Couldn't figure out why the bilge was going on. Not sure where the plugs are located in the v-drives, but in the direct drives, you gotta bend contort a bit to put the plug in.

CantRepeat
06-12-2009, 07:35 PM
Mine is brass and I remove it everytime. I drilled a little hole in the T handle and put some rope through it. I hang it around the steering wheel so as to make sure I never launch without it in the boat.

Yellow X9
06-12-2009, 07:55 PM
The advantage of the old brass plugs!

I'll 2nd that

XPC Sealman
07-01-2009, 02:41 PM
The only advantage is they will cost you more and drain your $$$$ faster.

nauti-dreamer
10-12-2011, 10:42 AM
I've got a 2007 Prostar 214 with the same molded drain and plug. Recently had two issues with it.

First being, the plug went missing after it came back from service. My solution will be to teather the replacement plug to the hull!! (minor)

Second issue is that the female drain is showing signs of cross threading so I'd like to address it now before it becomes a major problem. (preventative maintenance)

Questions to the Forum:
1. The replacement cost of the plastic is ~ $30. Brass is ~ $40. Has anyone thought of or tried swapping these components with standard pipe fittings you can get from a local hardware store for less than $10?
2. Are the threads the same on the brass and plastic plugs? Skidim calls out 3/4" NPT on the brass drain and plug assembly. Can anyone verify the thread callout for the plastic design?
3. I'm sure MC buys the plastic design from a supplier, but would it not make more sense to use a thread design that doesn't cross-thread? ditch the NPT and let the O-ring provide the seal. thougthts??????

thatsmrmastercraft
10-12-2011, 11:01 AM
I've got a 2007 Prostar 214 with the same molded drain and plug. Recently had two issues with it.

First being, the plug went missing after it came back from service. My solution will be to teather the replacement plug to the hull!! (minor)

Second issue is that the female drain is showing signs of cross threading so I'd like to address it now before it becomes a major problem. (preventative maintenance)

Questions to the Forum:
1. The replacement cost of the plastic is ~ $30. Brass is ~ $40. Has anyone thought of or tried swapping these components with standard pipe fittings you can get from a local hardware store for less than $10?
2. Are the threads the same on the brass and plastic plugs? Skidim calls out 3/4" NPT on the brass drain and plug assembly. Can anyone verify the thread callout for the plastic design?
3. I'm sure MC buys the plastic design from a supplier, but would it not make more sense to use a thread design that doesn't cross-thread? ditch the NPT and let the O-ring provide the seal. thougthts??????

Very well done, sir. Tinkering would be trying to improve the threads with a dull pocket knife while at the launch, even though you can still carefully thread the plug in.:rolleyes:

Good luck with this project.

Evan Jones
10-12-2011, 02:54 PM
It is the same as plumbing pipe threads. I keep a spare plumbing plug in my tool kit. I think it is 3/4" MPT

jmhjgh
10-12-2011, 03:11 PM
Because of the threat of invasive species, in Minnesota it is illegal to trailer your boat with the drain plug in. As mentioned by others, it is a pipe thread and if used properly, it will not be an issue.

mikeg205
10-12-2011, 03:14 PM
same here!!

nauti-dreamer
10-12-2011, 05:06 PM
Thx, Mr Jones. I'll see about getting a 3/4" MPT spare.

All, I don't want to pull a 'MIskier' here and geek out but the NPT was designed for metal substrates, correct? Not plastic. Although the molded drain and plug do seem to have a high rating for material hardness (meaning someone did a little bit of R&D), I would prefer to see the parts made using metal to ensure longer durability. In other words: a harder material = fine thread; Softer material = course thread.

If market prices dictate a plastic material and molding mfg process, so be it, but shouldn't the thread be re-designed to something more robust? I for one do not think it's acceptable to have cross-threading after only 90 hrs on a boat. (And yes I understand how to turn a threaded part).

Also, just an observation, I'm not seeing the sealing-angle of the mating thread on these molded parts. Anyone ever heard of a 'straight' pipe thread???

I'll step down off my soap box now.

(Just one more project added to the winter-list!)

jwardenjr
10-12-2011, 06:39 PM
I just purchased spares they cost me $15 each and I keep them in the boat. I drilled a hole in the plastic t handle of the center bilge plug and connect it right to my keys via a clip so that no one can launch the boat without seeing the plug. In general I drain the bilge and put it right back in so there is never an issue. I will say you must be carefull as they do cross thread very easily.