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jef3680
05-10-2009, 02:10 PM
I have a 2003 Pro Star 197 and started loosing the letters from the Transom Decal. I found and ordered a replacement, can someone give me a good procedure for installing the new decals since they are individual letters.

Sodar
05-10-2009, 08:06 PM
They are individual letters, but they are all connect with a masking. Spray the area with some soapy water and remove the backing on the decal. Position the decal and work the soapy water out with a squeegy over the masking. Let everything dry for while and remove the backing.

TMCNo1
05-10-2009, 08:34 PM
This thread may help, http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=8465

jef3680
05-11-2009, 12:35 PM
Thanks everyone for your responses.

jef3680
05-14-2009, 05:33 PM
One more question. I have now polished the area with a Gel Coat Fine Cut Polish and I was going to install the decal prior to appliying a Gel Coat Micro-polish and Sealant. Should I wipe the area where I am going to apply the Decal with Acetone prior to applying the decal?

east tx skier
05-14-2009, 05:50 PM
You need something that completely removes any residue. I can't recall what he used, but the inboard mechanic who did my decals used something other than acetone because he claimed it merely removed the residue and smeared it around while the other stuff somehow dissolved it. My memory may be crossfiring, but you might want to look into it.

He also didn't do the soap and water method. He taped the backing at the top and cut the backing vertically separating individual leters. Then he worked them on top to bottom. No squeegeeing required and not one bubble.

The dude was an absolute wizard with decals. I have done the soap and water thing on other decals though and it works. I only mention this because it is another way to skin the cat.

bigmac
05-14-2009, 06:02 PM
Lacquer thinner is commonly used to remove wax or other stuff that may impair decal adhesion. It evaporates quickly and won't harm gelcoat.

Acetone will work...not sure I understand about the concept of dissolving vs just "moving it around". IMHO, that's more a function of the cloth one uses to wipe the area than the solvent used -- greasy grime would need to be dissolved to move around. Acetone is extremely effective as a solvent on acetone. The only thing I can think of that might be better would be trichloroethane, but that's no longer sold (ozone depletion, y'know). Trichloroethylene might be available, but IMHO, lacquer thinner or acetone are cheap, readily available at the hardware store, and work just as well.

jef3680
05-14-2009, 06:04 PM
Thanks Everyone, I think I will give Acetone a try.

Farmer Ted
05-14-2009, 06:19 PM
wipe the area with alcohol and water with a lint free cloth

bturner2
05-14-2009, 06:52 PM
I use gease and wax remover that you can get at any auto store. Started using this stuff for prep when I worked at a Chrysler dealership when I was going through college. Works great everytime.

Also use it for all my painting projects to prevent fish eye and lifting.

TMCNo1
05-14-2009, 07:31 PM
I've always used this to prep paint for my application of hand painted pinstripes and decal application,
47451http://semproducts.com/Catalog.asp?prod=81

east tx skier
05-15-2009, 11:56 AM
Lacquer thinner is commonly used to remove wax or other stuff that may impair decal adhesion. It evaporates quickly and won't harm gelcoat.

Acetone will work...not sure I understand about the concept of dissolving vs just "moving it around". IMHO, that's more a function of the cloth one uses to wipe the area than the solvent used -- greasy grime would need to be dissolved to move around. Acetone is extremely effective as a solvent on acetone. The only thing I can think of that might be better would be trichloroethane, but that's no longer sold (ozone depletion, y'know). Trichloroethylene might be available, but IMHO, lacquer thinner or acetone are cheap, readily available at the hardware store, and work just as well.

Again, I was about half listening when he said this. Whatever he used was in a spray can and worked well. Might be that stuff Harold recommended. It came up because I had done the removal of the old stuff. I asked him if I needed to wipe it down with acetone and he said not to bother because he would be using something else to be sure that all of the wax was gone.

Muttley
05-15-2009, 12:26 PM
Well, in the sign business, we use a product called Rapid Remover (Goof Off or Goo Gone will do in a pinch), then Windex. If it's greasy or has silicone residue, isopropanol (rubbing alcohol).

Lacquer thinner and acetone just swirls the mess around and will ruin car finishes... plus if it drips on the trailer paint...:eek:

For application, a little soapy water (Ivory or Palmolive - gentle on hands) in a spray bottle with water works great if you aren't brave. I usually tape the decal in place, put a piece of tape top & bottom in the centre, peel back the first half, cut the wax back paper (NOT AGAINST THE BOAT!!) then squeegee (credit card?) from centre up & down to the outside... peel back the other half and remove the rest of the backing paper and repeat the squeegee thing... I had an instruction page for people who wanted to do there own installations... I'll see if I can dig it up.