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View Full Version : Matching Gelcoat Colors from kits.


climbinggod
05-05-2009, 10:45 PM
Hi All,

I have a very minor repair to do on my Gelcoat. 2 little spots. One spot is the Crystal white and the other is the Emerald ( sort of a dark green). The colors are from a 1993 Prostar 190. Does anyone have experience with mixing these two colors or anyone with any advice on which primary colors to use to get these colors?

sand2snow22
05-06-2009, 12:31 AM
Get your hull id # to your local dealer and have them set you up with matching gelcoat.

Sodar
05-06-2009, 12:36 AM
Match your gelcoat here (http://www.spectrumcolor.com/catalog.htm) and order some up.

bturner2
05-06-2009, 05:20 PM
I second Sodar's recommendation on Spectrum Color. Ordered White which can be tough to match and it matched perfectly.

bigmac
05-06-2009, 09:31 PM
I second Sodar's recommendation on Spectrum Color. Ordered White which can be tough to match and it matched perfectly.

X3

I just dug out some of the Sunrise Yellow I ordered from Spectrum about 18 months ago in order to fill some chips on the swim platform and on my trailer fender. Worked great, ready to sand in about 45 minutes, and color match was absolutely perfect. No mixing required. Never again will I go with one of those Evercoat kits.

MCVOLS
05-06-2009, 09:35 PM
I will also agree with the Spectrum Color recomendation. I ordered some blue for my '93 PS205 over the winter, perfect match! Dealer couldn't get it from MC due to age of the boat.

climbinggod
05-06-2009, 10:48 PM
Okay here's another question. If I sanded my whole boat do I have to wet sand it? What are the advantages to wet sanding. Could I use an orbital sander?? I was going to go as fine as 1000 grit.

bigmac
05-06-2009, 11:50 PM
Okay here's another question. If I sanded my whole boat do I have to wet sand it? What are the advantages to wet sanding. Could I use an orbital sander?? I was going to go as fine as 1000 grit.

Why do you want to do that? Sounds like a lot of work that would be better accomplished by getting an automotive buffer (NOT an orbital sander, or one of those hokey wax applier machines they sell at the hardware store, but an actual automotive buffer with the pads and chemicals used in body shops).

There are a number of threads here on Team Talk about gel coat restoration, if getting rid of oxidation is your goal.

climbinggod
05-07-2009, 09:20 AM
I have all that stuff and spent a weekend last year doing it. The results were good but there are still several scratches and oxidation that didn't come out and that I would like to get rid of as well.

norris_ps205
05-07-2009, 10:54 AM
I got the exact same colors from Spectrum for my previous boat....93 PS 205. Perfect match.

climbinggod
05-07-2009, 08:28 PM
I got the exact same colors from Spectrum for my previous boat....93 PS 205. Perfect match.

What color of white did spectrum send you Norris? On the Prostar brochure it says that the color is Crystal White. I did not find a listing for that on Spectrum.

bigmac
05-07-2009, 10:13 PM
Spectrum's name for the color of white for that year MasterCraft is apparently "glacier white". On the window sticker for my boat, the white color is just listed as "white", while again, Spectrum labels it as "glacier white".

I'm not sure that Spectrum's name for a given color is always the same as Mastercraft's.


/

norris_ps205
05-07-2009, 10:42 PM
What color of white did spectrum send you Norris? On the Prostar brochure it says that the color is Crystal White. I did not find a listing for that on Spectrum.
Same as what bigmac says...glacier white.

clemlochner
05-15-2009, 06:59 PM
Good information guys. My 91 prostar is black hull with grey top and bottom. On the spectrum website is that "grey dawn"?

I've got two pretty good dings from when a dock hit the top part of the side.

If I fill those in with the gelcoat from spectrum, does anything go over top of it?

Thanks.

Thrall
06-02-2009, 01:23 PM
clem, Nothing goes over the gelcoat. It is the finish coat.

I do have a question for those that have done some repairs. As I understand, you can't feather out gelcoat real thin or it won't cure right. This leads to how to 'blend' the repair line. Once sanded out, is the repair line even visible (assuming color matches well)?
I'm used to auto body where you blend into the good area around the repair and there's no definitive 'line' between old and new.

FYI, Shane Winkler at SPectrum Color has been very helpful. Had a couple questions and he was prompt and thorough in answering them. He's the guy who responded when I emailed them a question to their customer service email.
Fixin' to order some repair stuff from them.

Thrall
06-02-2009, 02:26 PM
clem, Nothing goes over the gelcoat. It is the finish coat.

I do have a question for those that have done some repairs. As I understand, you can't feather out gelcoat real thin or it won't cure right. This leads to how to 'blend' the repair line. Once sanded out, is the repair line even visible (assuming color matches well)?
I'm used to auto body where you blend into the good area around the repair and there's no definitive 'line' between old and new.

FYI, Shane Winkler at SPectrum Color has been very helpful. Had a couple questions and he was prompt and thorough in answering them. He's the guy who responded when I emailed them a question to their customer service email.
Fixin' to order some repair stuff from them.

Jorski
06-02-2009, 02:49 PM
Thrall, with gel there is no visible line if the colour is spot on. The only thing that can mess up the repair is a poor colour match OR if you have unrepaired oxidation next to the new gel in the repaired spot.

I know that it seems wierd, but, if you get it level (starting slightly above level) and are patient enough work your way through the grades down to very fine wet sand paper and then progress to buffing it comes out about perfect...and I had zero autobody repair experience before trying it.

You will do fine.

TX.X-30 fan
06-02-2009, 07:14 PM
Thrall, with gel there is no visible line if the colour is spot on. The only thing that can mess up the repair is a poor colour match OR if you have unrepaired oxidation next to the new gel in the repaired spot.

I know that it seems wierd, but, if you get it level (starting slightly above level) and are patient enough work your way through the grades down to very fine wet sand paper and then progress to buffing it comes out about perfect...and I had zero autobody repair experience before trying it.

You will do fine.



With all that physical exertion I bet you were pumping out a lot of co2. :D

bturner2
06-02-2009, 09:24 PM
One thing that I would recommend while sanding is to use some sort of block to keep the repaired area flat. There is a great temtatiion to hurry the process by focusing on the area being sanded and leaving a groove.

Thrall
06-04-2009, 01:05 PM
Thanks Jorski. That's what I was wondering, if the old and new will "melt" together. Heck, that alone makes gelcoat repairs sound way easier than paint!

Bturner2, yep , block sandind is a must!