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CantRepeat
04-19-2009, 08:22 AM
If you end up upgrading your electrical system you may want to take a look at these weather tight connectors. They are the type used on GM vehicals.


http://www.keefeperformance.com/weatherpack_connectors.html

JimN
04-19-2009, 11:12 AM
Also, it's best to solder the terminal after crimping. What they use when assembling the harnesses is an automated setup that provides much more pressure and crimping by hand is never as consistent. Soldering will minimize intermittent problems and difficult troubleshooting.

The Delphi crimper and one Tessco model are the only ones that are really correct. Anything else is not going to do it properly and the attachment will be weaker.

CantRepeat
04-19-2009, 12:37 PM
I wish I had a hydraulic crimper and a robot to solder the connections for me.

JimN
04-19-2009, 01:12 PM
I wish I had a hydraulic crimper and a robot to solder the connections for me.

Just think of what kind of Erector Set you could build. :D

CantRepeat
04-19-2009, 01:49 PM
Just think of what kind of Erector Set you could build. :D

Ponder ... :D

bbymgr
04-19-2009, 03:22 PM
Won't duct tape work just as well??:rolleyes::D:rolleyes:

JimN
04-19-2009, 03:38 PM
Won't duct tape work just as well??:rolleyes::D:rolleyes:

You mean, twisting the wires and wrapping them? Yeah, that works great. Until it gets hot. Or, Scotch Locks.

When I did car audio, I hated working on cars that were wired this way. Usually, they went up a few inches from the end and the glue coated every strand, the insulation and got all over my hands and tools.

bbymgr
04-19-2009, 03:51 PM
You mean, twisting the wires and wrapping them? Yeah, that works great. Until it gets hot. Or, Scotch Locks.

When I did car audio, I hated working on cars that were wired this way. Usually, they went up a few inches from the end and the glue coated every strand, the insulation and got all over my hands and tools.

I remember customers at Best Buy that didn't want to pay for a professional install, and when everything quit working, they would come back in to have everything re-done. My lead installer(Cabe) would be b!tch!ng about all the glue on the wires.

JimN
04-19-2009, 04:03 PM
I remember customers at Best Buy that didn't want to pay for a professional install, and when everything quit working, they would come back in to have everything re-done. My lead installer(Cabe) would be b!tch!ng about all the glue on the wires.

I had a good time with the customers who came in to have their system wiring corrected. I'd look into it, let them know what it would take to get it working and ask who wired it before. They usually said "I got a guy...", "My neighbor, who's good with this stuff" or "I have a friend who's an electrical engineer". Mhy typical response was "get rid of your guy", "No, he's not" and "OH, NOOOOOOO!".

Re: not wanting to pay for the install- it could be free and still not be cheap enough.

At the last place I ran the install shop, the idiots in sales just couldn't sell the installation, usually because they assumed the customers didn't have enough money to pay for it, so they didn't bother asking for the sale on that. They figured that they were doing OK by getting the sale of the equipment. My shop had the highest CSI in the company for 2-1/2 years running (3.8 out of 4 points), we had virtually no reworks and even with the people who "don't have the money", we did most of the installs, sold parts and accessories and they came to us first for recommendations before going back into the store.

The problem with them not selling the install was that when they sold it, they had a .2% return rate on equipment sales and when they didn't sell install, it ballooned to 15%. All returns went to the service department to verify a problem and in most cases, there wasn't one- it was all because of being wired wrong/badly. If no problem was found, it went back to the store, the salesman lost their commission, the sales department was charged $15/service item and the "defective equipment" went into the "demo unit" case, to be sold at a big discount. As an example, selling the install on a 2 channel amp was $30 with cost to sales of 62%. If the amp was $200, cost may have been $150 + $18.60= $168.60. $50 profit + $13.40 = $63.40 if they sold install. If the amp was priced at $170 in the demo case, after costing sales $15, the profit ends up being $5 and sometimes, the same person would return two or more pieces because of the same problem, even though it was their installation that caused it to not work.

bbymgr
04-19-2009, 04:09 PM
I had a good time with the customers who came in to have their system wiring corrected. I'd look into it, let them know what it would take to get it working and ask who wired it before. They usually said "I got a guy...", "My neighbor, who's good with this stuff" or "I have a friend who's an electrical engineer". Mhy typical response was "get rid of your guy", "No, he's not" and "OH, NOOOOOOO!".

Re: not wanting to pay for the install- it could be free and still not be cheap enough.

LOL!!!!:D:D

bbymgr
04-19-2009, 04:30 PM
At the last place I ran the install shop, the idiots in sales just couldn't sell the installation, usually because they assumed the customers didn't have enough money to pay for it, so they didn't bother asking for the sale on that. They figured that they were doing OK by getting the sale of the equipment. My shop had the highest CSI in the company for 2-1/2 years running (3.8 out of 4 points), we had virtually no reworks and even with the people who "don't have the money", we did most of the installs, sold parts and accessories and they came to us first for recommendations before going back into the store.

The problem with them not selling the install was that when they sold it, they had a .2% return rate on equipment sales and when they didn't sell install, it ballooned to 15%. All returns went to the service department to verify a problem and in most cases, there wasn't one- it was all because of being wired wrong/badly. If no problem was found, it went back to the store, the salesman lost their commission, the sales department was charged $15/service item and the "defective equipment" went into the "demo unit" case, to be sold at a big discount. As an example, selling the install on a 2 channel amp was $30 with cost to sales of 62%. If the amp was $200, cost may have been $150 + $18.60= $168.60. $50 profit + $13.40 = $63.40 if they sold install. If the amp was priced at $170 in the demo case, after costing sales $15, the profit ends up being $5 and sometimes, the same person would return two or more pieces because of the same problem, even though it was their installation that caused it to not work.

I had the same problem at my store, so I started staffing an installer on the floor during "prime times". Our install % went off the charts almost immediately. They were doing so good that Best Buy made that store the only one in the company that did customized installs, ie fabricating and the whole nine yards. They did great until the lead installer(Cabe) left for California and joined Pimp My Ride on MTV. They never found another installer as good as him.