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View Full Version : How long would you wait to hear about a job?


loeweb
03-24-2009, 05:51 PM
Just a simple question. How long would you wait to hear about a job that you applied for?
I applied for the head football coach position in my building about 10 weeks ago. I have yet to interview, and getting really frustrated with the amount of time it has taken to interview. Any ideas appreciated, I am about to pull my name and tell them to stick it!

Datdude
03-24-2009, 05:56 PM
10 weeks is longer than I would wait. Can you call someone and find out what is going on?

brucemac
03-24-2009, 05:57 PM
i wouldn't wait, i'd call, email, inquire etc. maybe you've already done that, but imo persistence shows interest/respect/desire for position, etc.

flipper
03-24-2009, 05:57 PM
Not more than two weeks before I start calling them to find out what's up

loeweb
03-24-2009, 06:00 PM
I talked to the Supt. about a week after I applied, then again three weeks after that. Since then I have been patiently waiting for them to interview other positions that they have tried to tie to the job, with no success. Now I am just waiting.

h2oskifreak
03-24-2009, 06:30 PM
Don't wait, don't withdraw your name, just keep looking. We live in a unique time. It used to be common manners to follow up with an applicant good or bad. In todays employment world, there is no such obligation. That doesn't make it right it's just a fact. Most companies do their applications online and there is no "contact" whatsoever. Computers are not all they are cracked up to be, it is a way for people to hide and be rude IMO.

JohnE
03-24-2009, 07:33 PM
Chances are there are some behind the scenes politics going on. I would follow up with phone calls, emails, and letters. But I'd say you have little chance at the postion. I wouldn't withdraw out of spite. Rather than that I'd just let it play out without a follow up. You have no reason to burn a bridge just for personal satisfaction. i.e. "You can't fire me, I quit".

TX.X-30 fan
03-24-2009, 07:36 PM
Chances are there are some behind the scenes politics going on. I would follow up with phone calls, emails, and letters. But I'd say you have little chance at the postion. I wouldn't withdraw out of spite. Rather than that I'd just let it play out without a follow up. You have no reason to burn a bridge just for personal satisfaction. i.e. "You can't fire me, I quit".




Can I quote you on that. How are the pool breakers coming??:mad:

JohnE
03-24-2009, 07:40 PM
Can I quote you on that. How are the pool breakers coming??:mad:


I swear to god I thought about calling the guy today!!!:D

You can quote me on anything, Stu.:cool:

JohnE
03-24-2009, 07:41 PM
BTW, I did withdraw my name from an inspector's position last year. IT was a complete debacle where the town railroaded the guy who was doing the job for over 10 years....

bbymgr
03-24-2009, 10:57 PM
I'm not sure what state you teach in, but in Indiana the coaching positions have to be offered in house first. If no existing staff member wants the position, then the School Corporation can go outside to hire a coach. I mention this because my dad was a Superintendent for 32 years, and I recall a time when a teacher wanted the varsity head baseball coaching position, but my dad had someone else in mind. My dad did some political BS move and out waited the teacher so that he could get the guy he wanted. You need to check in to make sure there isn't something else you need to do to keep in the running for the position.

scott023
03-24-2009, 11:15 PM
10 weeks is WAY too long... I'd start inquiring, get a feel for what's going on. You'd think if they needed to fill it, they wouldn't procrastinate it that long....

loeweb
03-25-2009, 03:47 PM
Thanks for the input. I was thinking along the same lines as a lot of you, this just reaffirms it. thanks again