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View Full Version : Need to rebuild 2000 ProStar 190 330 LTR - D'oh - Winterize! winterize! winterize!


jwebste1
03-13-2009, 05:34 PM
I waited wayyyy way to long..... I called my dealer and he told me "it will only happen once".......:confused:

Well.... I've always wanted to rebuild a V8... all I know for sure at this point is that the block on the outside is definitely cracked in spots.

Since I bought the boat used.... I was not aware that the factory frost plugs where not in it (the plugs didn't break off when the water froze...)

I'm looking for any advice anyone can provide on how to deal with this trauma.

Also, if I'm going to go to the trouble and time of rebuilding the engine are there any recommendations on things I could do to take advantage of this situation by upgrading anything or adding any ammentities?

The list of other issues seems pretty silly but if I can hit those birds with the same stone...

left speed gauge doesn't work
oil pressure dial\gauge not funtioning
one of the spedometers is not working.

Just want to make sure I don't miss opportunites to fix these issues once the motor is pulled.

Also a buddy of mine mentioned there is a winterizing kit I can buy that makes draining your engine and block as easy as opening a ball valve....? After this issue that sounds mighty nice.... I could see a way to do it if there isn't a kit... but if there is a reasonably priced kit - I'd love to save some time and spend it on having fun instead.

pkskier
03-13-2009, 05:45 PM
If the block is cracked, what is there to rebuild?

cbryan70
03-13-2009, 05:51 PM
This is what i was thinking as well

pkskier
03-13-2009, 05:53 PM
Buy and short block and put your accessories on it.

jwebste1
03-13-2009, 05:58 PM
Will I be buying a new engine? Or is there savings by just replacing the block?

All I know right now is that there are cracks on the outside of the block... The dealer told me there is a chance that the cylinder walls are not cracked. Dealer also mentioned that I might be able to buy a rebuilt block for about a third to half of what a new engine would be...

flipper
03-13-2009, 05:59 PM
Get a marine short block, and transfer all your bolt ons to that. Now would be the time to pump it up a little if you want to. Yes, there is a lot of savings by doing this instead of buying a new engine.

jwebste1
03-13-2009, 06:05 PM
Any suggestions on how to "pump it up". Might as well..... probably won't have another chance :) - try to make lemonade out of the lemon....

jwebste1
03-13-2009, 06:06 PM
Also any estimate as to how long an intermediate skill level mechanic would take to complete the block replacment?

Jerseydave
03-13-2009, 06:16 PM
Get someone who has worked on chevy engines to help you.......replacing a marine engine is a little more complex than replacing one in an old camaro. :D

Not sure what "pumping it up" means, but save your money. Your boat won't go any faster than it would with a stock engine. In fact, a prop change would be a bigger benefit in most cases.

flipper
03-13-2009, 06:23 PM
Any suggestions on how to "pump it up". Might as well..... probably won't have another chance :) - try to make lemonade out of the lemon....

Heads, cam, intake, what ever you'd like.

flipper
03-13-2009, 06:25 PM
Get someone who has worked on chevy engines to help you.......replacing a marine engine is a little more complex than replacing one in an old camaro. :D

I wouldn't say that, to me it's easier on the boat really

Not sure what "pumping it up" means, but save your money. Your boat won't go any faster than it would with a stock engine. In fact, a prop change would be a bigger benefit in most cases.

A prop will make a huge difference, and if you do engine mods, you'll more than likely need to change the prop. The boat can be made to go faster, pull harder with engine mods, just depends on how much coin you want to dump

Kevin&Annie
03-13-2009, 06:34 PM
just get some JB weld..:D

corey
03-13-2009, 06:43 PM
J, I said it would only happen once cause i know you'll never forget to winterize again! Actually we had a customer forget twice, but since I know you I know you wont be that guy!

Hope the rebuild goes well. I can't rembember if you picked one up or not but you might want to check out the Indmar Manual from Clymer. It wont cover an engine swap but it will cover all the nuts and bolts of a 350.

east tx skier
03-13-2009, 10:36 PM
Also a buddy of mine mentioned there is a winterizing kit I can buy that makes draining your engine and block as easy as opening a ball valve....? After this issue that sounds mighty nice.... I could see a way to do it if there isn't a kit... but if there is a reasonably priced kit - I'd love to save some time and spend it on having fun instead.

They're handy, but I think the restriction in the barbs is going to be a spot for rust to collect and block the water flow. For this same reason, I ditched the petcocks on my last two boats and went with regular plugs.

Get a nice big box wrench for the manifold plugs to make it easy. It takes less than 10 minutes to drain a block. Add five to disconnect hoses and spin out the water pump. The drain kit saves a bit of time, but not a whole lot.

JimN
03-13-2009, 10:59 PM
Also any estimate as to how long an intermediate skill level mechanic would take to complete the block replacment?

If they're familiar with a Chevy 350, they have air tools (to remove all of the accessories- not to put them back on), a good torque wrench (the clicker type, not the beam type), some kind of hoist and an engine stand, it can be done in less than 12 hours, out and in. Add some time for alignment and unfamiliarity with some things and it would be one long work day. Better to take some extra time but it's not a hard one to work on.

I wouldn't bother with changing the intake- the OEM is a pretty good breather. It's not far from the HP of the LT-1 and it's actually a little more torque. I saw a performance car magazine where the guy built a '69 442 Cutlass, using an LTR. That thing was a killer.

thatsmrmastercraft
03-14-2009, 01:20 AM
I waited wayyyy way to long..... I called my dealer and he told me "it will only happen once".......:confused:

Well.... I've always wanted to rebuild a V8... all I know for sure at this point is that the block on the outside is definitely cracked in spots.

Since I bought the boat used.... I was not aware that the factory frost plugs where not in it (the plugs didn't break off when the water froze...)

I'm looking for any advice anyone can provide on how to deal with this trauma.

Also, if I'm going to go to the trouble and time of rebuilding the engine are there any recommendations on things I could do to take advantage of this situation by upgrading anything or adding any ammentities?

The list of other issues seems pretty silly but if I can hit those birds with the same stone...

left speed gauge doesn't work
oil pressure dial\gauge not funtioning
one of the spedometers is not working.

Just want to make sure I don't miss opportunites to fix these issues once the motor is pulled.

Also a buddy of mine mentioned there is a winterizing kit I can buy that makes draining your engine and block as easy as opening a ball valve....? After this issue that sounds mighty nice.... I could see a way to do it if there isn't a kit... but if there is a reasonably priced kit - I'd love to save some time and spend it on having fun instead.

Sorry to hear - This is my first winter with a MC and I am really nervous for when I get it out of storage in two weeks to see if I did everything properly.

A little education about those freeze plugs. They are really casting plugs for when the engine is manufactured. They got to be called freeze plugs because they will sometimes pop out on a light freeze without causing any other damage. But with a hard freeze, you are out of luck as they were not designed to prevent any damage. Yours wasn't an issue of freeze plugs being factory of not, just life in the great white north.

jwebste1
03-17-2009, 06:00 PM
thanks for all the replies everyone! Especially on the estimate of how long it will take (I've found I usually need to multiply my estimates times 3 ;) ). I'm giving myself 3 days or so of actual wrench time (not so bad since I will be in the Man Cave of solitude while up at the cabin).

My wife and I just had twins (one of each) so it will be a little while before we need a ski boat. The pontoon boat should suffice for a year or so.

Corey... Good to know you are on this site! I do need to pick up the manual! You'll probably see me sometime in the next few months.

After doing a little research, the engine in stock form is plenty enough horsepower for our small lake needs - I'll spend the money on a better prop (especially since I'll then have an extra).

I'll certainly make due with JB weld but something tells me I'll see the same "shove cracks" on the inside that I see on the outside. Hopefully not. One thing is for sure. It was frozen solid :( (It will only happen once... it will only happen once)

jwebste1
03-20-2012, 12:13 PM
Well it's been more than a year but I'd like to get this engine fixed.

I took a better look at the engine this weekend and the the worst shoving I can see soo far is on the engine port/driver side above and to the front of bow most spark plug about a third of an inch below the bottom of the valve cover which I'm guessing means I also need headers in addition to the block?

For cost and interest sake I still want to repair/replace this on my own.

All advice welcome gonna need as much help as anyone is willing to provide.

First of all I need to get the engine out of the boat? Any easy solutions to that one?

If the header and. Locks are cracked is the whole thing shot? What can I expect to salvage/reuse?

johnlanguab
03-20-2012, 01:17 PM
There are a few folks on here who have bought long blocks from these people:

www.rapidomarine.com

The price is right and they will ship the engine to you. You'd just have to attach all the accessories, set the timing, and align everything.

johnlanguab
03-20-2012, 01:19 PM
I just noticed the year of your boat. I don't how that would translate into one of their 350's.

Patrick Hardy
03-20-2012, 02:05 PM
Also a buddy of mine mentioned there is a winterizing kit I can buy that makes draining your engine and block as easy as opening a ball valve....? After this issue that sounds mighty nice.... I could see a way to do it if there isn't a kit... but if there is a reasonably priced kit -I'd love to save some time and spend it on having fun instead.

[QUOTE=east tx skier;581125]They're handy, but I think the restriction in the barbs is going to be a spot for rust to collect and block the water flow. For this same reason, I ditched the petcocks on my last two boats and went with regular plugs.

I have used petcocks on my 1996 PS190 for over ten years with absolutely no problems. I open them up and drain the water after every use from mid October to mid April. I insert a piece of old style metal hanger to make sure that there is nothing clogging up the petcocks.
It makes draining the water real easy and fast.

Here is a link for them - http://www.skidim.com/prodinfo.asp?number=MCM000

east tx skier
03-20-2012, 02:18 PM
I have used petcocks on my 1996 PS190 for over ten years with absolutely no problems. I open them up and drain the water after every use from mid October to mid April. I insert a piece of old style metal hanger to make sure that there is nothing clogging up the petcocks.
It makes draining the water real easy and fast.

Here is a link for them - http://www.skidim.com/prodinfo.asp?number=MCM000


I have personally seen petcocks clog that were not unclogged by the coat hangar method. I'm glad they have worked well for you, but they have been the first things to get replaced on my last two boats. Regular brass plugs take only a few seconds longer to remove with a box end wrench, allow the water to quickly drain, and replace. Again, I'm glad you have had success with the petcocks. But that hasn't been my experience.

mikeg205
03-20-2012, 06:07 PM
I have personally seen petcocks clog that were not unclogged by the coat hangar method. I'm glad they have worked well for you, but they have been the first things to get replaced on my last two boats. Regular brass plugs take only a few seconds longer to remove with a box end wrench, allow the water to quickly drain, and replace. Again, I'm glad you have had success with the petcocks. But that hasn't been my experience.

+1 on that EastTX

jwebste1
03-20-2012, 06:29 PM
I have checked them out. I think I just need a "short block" with headers from them and everything should transfer. I'll try giving them a call soon.


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