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View Full Version : The new X2 has arrived!


Witness140
02-20-2009, 10:52 PM
The boat arrived Thursday morning! Went up to check it out today. It will be prepped on Tuesday and brought down to the cover shop for the custom cover. Really looking fwd to seeing it in the shop all put together. Not as much as I'm looking forward to the ice melting though.....

More pics to follow as they get it all unwrapped. Thanks to Marc at Echo Bay Marina in Brookfield, CT for staying late today to finish the paperwork and let me check it out.

Colors are ruby red flake with midnight black. Top deck is white.

TheOneandOnly
02-20-2009, 10:55 PM
congrads looks swweet... We have the 08 x2 and love it, however you will see the wake is alittle small without the highfly system. Its well worth the upgrade!

Witness140
02-20-2009, 10:59 PM
Here's the interior. This is gonna be a great boat. Thanks everyone for all the input picking options and all the other info that goes along with the boat buying process. This is our first 'new' boat, and the process is certainly more involved than buying a used one.

We went with the following options.

MCX
2 tower speakers with fwd lights
Zero Off 3 event
Heater
Seat Heat
Transom Remote
Transom Step
Teak platform with transom saver
Attitude Plate
Bow filler cushion
Shower
Removable Pylon
IPOD adapter

Already picked up 2 more tower speakers with lights on ebay. Marc at Echo Bay talked MC into giving me the bigger JL 4500 bottom amp to drive the 4 tower speakers. Otherwise, ordering with only 2 speakers they install the JL 2250.

Witness140
02-20-2009, 11:02 PM
congrads looks swweet... We have the 08 x2 and love it, however you will see the wake is alittle small without the highfly system. Its well worth the upgrade!

We're coming from a 197. Recovering bouy head that just started riding last season. I'm sure it will be plenty big for me initially. Psyched to have all that storage and room for all the kids stuff. I have two 350# fat sacs to put in the rear lockers, as well as a 500# sack we could always throw in the walkthrough for now. Should have seen all of that in the 197 with 7 people. LOL. We'll feel a little more secure in the X2.

03 35th Anniversary
02-20-2009, 11:08 PM
Good Looking Boat!!!

TheOneandOnly
02-20-2009, 11:10 PM
We're coming from a 197. Recovering bouy head that just started riding last season. I'm sure it will be plenty big for me initially. Psyched to have all that storage and room for all the kids stuff. I have two 350# fat sacs to put in the rear lockers, as well as a 500# sack we could always throw in the walkthrough for now. Should have seen all of that in the 197 with 7 people. LOL. We'll feel a little more secure in the X2.

thats cool. The storage room is nice especially if you have 7 on board. We had 8 onboard and everyone was comfy with 2k of ballast the wake was sweet. Had a few scarred to get out back :) (i.e. can not wait till summer) FYi the high fly i think is only 350 on each side in the back and 800 up front. You will have plenty with what you have, should you want more.

With the x2 youll love it in chop handles well without taking rollers easily like you prob noticed in your 197.

Witness140
02-20-2009, 11:17 PM
With the x2 youll love it in chop handles well without taking rollers easily like you prob noticed in your 197.

When I was driving, no big deal. Let a buddy drive, and guaranteed the bilge pump was going to get a workout with the 197. Not anymore!!

If anyone needs a babied and well cared for 07' TT 197, get in touch with Echo Bay in CT. They are the new Mastercraft dealer up there. They have my old one that I traded in. Needs a new home.

brucemac
02-20-2009, 11:22 PM
two words

wow! & jealous!

lucky duck, love that boat.

nice job on the details and congrats witness!

i really dig the diamond stitch. it's really grown on me.

scott023
02-20-2009, 11:30 PM
Witness, that is SWWEEETTT. The exact color set up I was building before we decided on the X45. Congrats, now we just need spring to roll around...:D

TMCNo1
02-21-2009, 12:23 AM
Congratulations on your new arrival!

thatsmrmastercraft
02-21-2009, 12:30 AM
Thats one handsome boat!

shepherd
02-21-2009, 01:13 AM
Very nice. You and yours are going to really enjoy the water this summer!

scramison
02-21-2009, 05:22 AM
Congrats man I really like red and black color combos on anything.

Im pretty sure you have the break-in covered. Not sure what everyone else has told you but I would do heat cycles if I was you. Run it up to temp and scoot around for 5 minutes. Let it completely cool down and run it up to temp scooting around for 10 minutes. Just keep adding 5 minutes till your at 20 minutes or 30 minutes if your really anal and you have a perfectly broke in boat. Oh yea and of course just don't flog it keep it under atleast 3k rpms maybe even under 2300 with a few short bursts above that. You want to set the piston rings correctly after your break in.

I can elaborate some more if you want.

edit: Also change your oil after break-in it will go a long way in keeping your engine power up and in top shape.

Chief
02-21-2009, 07:32 AM
Nice! I like the colors!

Witness140
02-21-2009, 11:29 AM
I can elaborate some more if you want.

I'm all ears. The Indmar guidance sounds pretty simple, but doesn't talk about the heat cycling you mentioned. I'm sure break-in is one of those frequently debated topics like 'which motor oil.'

Does anyone know the profile the factory runs when they put it in the water prior to shipping?

Witness140
02-21-2009, 11:51 AM
Nice! I like the colors!

Thanks! The color choice was tough. My 197's were garaged and trailered. As nice as that was for the boats, it reduced how much I used them and increased frustration. Trailering introduces a lot of opportunities for nicks, scrapes, and tears, no matter how anal or careful you are.

My 06' TT had a red bottom with white side band. The 07' TT was all white. If the boat was just waxed, I could leave it in the water for about 24hrs before I'd get an odd yellow tint to the side band on the 06' or sections of the hull on the 07'. It wasn't the usual scum either. It was like the water was penetrating the pores in certain areas of gelcoat and tinting it yellow. The pattern was always the same, and would take about 2 hours to appear if the boat wasn't just waxed. Rubbing it with the pad would take off the surface growth, but not the tint. The tint would only come out with hull cleaner. That meant a follow-up with more wax was needed. Result - a beautiful boat that doesn't get used as much as it gets cared for. Alarming that I've been swimming and skiing in this lake for 30+ years. :)

I loved the 07' TT boat's graphics and appearance - in photos or on the trailer! When the boat would be coming back to get me after a set though....I'd cringe. Looking at the scum ring on the white boat drove me nuts. (and that would be there after one outing) Walking past it in the garage with the tint drove me nuts. Typically I'd only put it in for the day and take it home to the garage. But, having a family of 5 at the time, there are other priorities after that 'day' besides washing and waxing the boat. So a quick (1 hr) rinse and some soap, and in the garage she would go typically. Then 2 days later, repeat process, but this time, yellow tint starting. Repeat. This time she might sit in overnight so we could do an evening set followed by a morning set. Now the tint is really bad. Bottom cleaner time. Now there is no wax on the boat, so now we need a couple hours that are hard to find with a wife and 3 kids.

Hence, the desire to go with a dark bottom, and no section of white touching the water. That really limited our choices. Red and yellow both fade quicker than other colors, based on talking to the dealer and other owners. Orange seemed decent, but my wife's high school colors were orange/black/white, so every switch or slider scheme we did looked too much like a high school mascot or pumpkin. Metalflake offers an additional barrier with the clear, which reduces fade, and IMHO it looks sharp. The wife immediately associated it with my brother-in-laws Skeeter. LOL. I spent last summer skiing,driving, and maintaining the ski club's black 08' TT 197. So an all black boat was also out of the question. Watch what happens when you get 30+ core slalom skiers treating a MC like a lawn tractor, and suddenly a black boat is just a scary scary thing for anal boat owners.

We almost did white top, canadian blue flake main, silver flake accent, black bottom. We were scared that was too many color changes from top to bottom, and would look too dark.

The wife and I kept finding great schemes - but they involved white bottoms.

In the end, the color choice just sorta narrowed itself down based on the requirements. The last choice was ruby red vs fire red flake. The ruby was a known, because we had pictures of anniversary boats and 09' TT 197's to work with. I found one fire red flake over black boat, but it had X graphics, so wasn't a direct comparison.

I spent hours on photoshop with tons of internet pictures. Adjusting hue, saturation etc.

When he pulled up the transhield yesterday, I breathed a sigh of relief....it looks good.

:)

JohnE
02-21-2009, 12:55 PM
Jerry, congrats on the new X2. It looks fantastic!!!! I'll bet you finally breathed a sigh of relief when it arrived and the paperwork was done. It's amazing all the little choices you get to make when ordering a boat, eh? I went through the same thing with the x14.

Here's to hoping for an early spring. :toast:

mccobmd
02-21-2009, 01:02 PM
Man, the more I see those boats the more I want to trade up from the X1 but those two little words "paid for" get in the way. Great looking boat.

PaulW
02-21-2009, 01:06 PM
Congrats on the boat it looks sweet, or as my son would say Sick. Come on spring were all hurting by now. More snow here today in IL:mad:

TX.X-30 fan
02-21-2009, 06:38 PM
What a great looking color scheme and I'm not a flake nut but I dig that boat. Upholstery in outstanding. Have fun and hope spring comes quick for us all.

Slinkyredfoot
02-21-2009, 07:34 PM
What a great looking color scheme and I'm not a flake nut but I dig that boat. Upholstery in outstanding. Have fun and hope spring comes quick for us all.

Your not a flake nut, you are a nut flake

Very nice looking ride and I am a flake nut..:cool:

TX.X-30 fan
02-21-2009, 08:00 PM
Your not a flake nut, you are a nut flake

..:cool:


Not a nut flake or a nut bush but I am a bush fan. :D:D

Footin
02-21-2009, 08:02 PM
That is puuurrrdy!

h2oskiier222
02-21-2009, 10:53 PM
I really like the ruby flake...Awesome looking boat. Congrats!

TallRedRider
02-21-2009, 11:18 PM
I'm all ears. The Indmar guidance sounds pretty simple, but doesn't talk about the heat cycling you mentioned. I'm sure break-in is one of those frequently debated topics like 'which motor oil.'

Does anyone know the profile the factory runs when they put it in the water prior to shipping?

Beautiful boat!!!!!!!!! Good times are ahead for sure.

Break in arguments kill me. There seem to be equally knowledgeable people with advice like you have received and others who state that you don't need to break it in like a 1957 chevy anymore. Who knows what to do...

Witness140
02-24-2009, 10:26 PM
I went up to Echo Bay Marina today to answer some questions regarding the initial prep. Had to decide on the font for my registration numbers. They have a vinyl cutter and software that will cut the letters. He has matching vinyl for the grey in the bullseye. We are going to outline the black letters with this grey to match the Mastercraft logo. I found a font that matches the logo. Boat looks sharp. I dropped off 2 more tower speakers for them to mount. Tomorrow it heads over to the cover shop for it's custom cover. We will be adding a flap on the transom that attaches just below the rubrail with a zipper. This flap will cover the platform, with the bottom edges being a mesh type material. This will hopefully keep the sun from fading the exposed transom. Check out the size of the new transom step. Actually looks like a functional step this year. Happy I went with that option, I think the kids will get use out of that.

Witness140
02-24-2009, 10:34 PM
Here's some better shots of the interior before the carpet went in. I initially was going to skip the snap install. Figured that we will very rarely run the boat without the carpet, and don't want to worry about trailering with an unsnapped carpet.

Interior choice was tough, I almost went with the new beach/moca combo. Didn't have it in me to take that gamble though. Went conservative instead. Not too much red, but enough to add color.

Witness140
02-24-2009, 10:36 PM
Here's some of the stuff I'm excited about. 3 event Zero Off and VDIG with integrated PP Wakeboard Pro. Checked my software revision and the ZeroOff shipped with P103.

Ryan
02-24-2009, 10:54 PM
thats cool. The storage room is nice especially if you have 7 on board. We had 8 onboard and everyone was comfy with 2k of ballast the wake was sweet. Had a few scarred to get out back :) (i.e. can not wait till summer) FYi the high fly i think is only 350 on each side in the back and 800 up front. You will have plenty with what you have, should you want more.

With the x2 youll love it in chop handles well without taking rollers easily like you prob noticed in your 197.

Slick ride. I love red & black. Let us know what you think of the ski wake when you get a chance to get a pull.

Witness140
02-24-2009, 11:12 PM
Ryan,

I was able to ski behind one during the shopping process. Jay at New England Freshwater Marine set me up with one of his customers that is selling his 07' X2.

Anyways, I took a slalom set, a wakeboard ride, and a trick set. I found the wake to be acceptable. It is no 197 by any means, but sorta reminded me of the wake behind old American Skiers. I skied it at 34mph between 22 and 32 off. 32 off was fine, no complaints there.

I'm more curious now how it will drive with a skier in the course. It is wider than the 197, so that will be an interesting site picture from the seat. Without tracking fins I'm thinking it might be interesting......especially with the pylon in the back.

For what I do on a trick ski it was just fine. Wake stuff is like going down the side of a mountain in comparison to the 197. The lip was decent.

I'm a new rider. The wake with half ballast was huge compared to my 197 with a lot of ballast. All I can really say is, it's gonna be fun.

JohnE
02-25-2009, 10:03 AM
Is the ice out yet?:rolleyes: I'm ready

bobx1
02-25-2009, 01:48 PM
Very nice!

scramison
02-25-2009, 04:33 PM
I'm all ears. The Indmar guidance sounds pretty simple, but doesn't talk about the heat cycling you mentioned. I'm sure break-in is one of those frequently debated topics like 'which motor oil.'




Its not quite like the motor oil debate. I think there are more definite truths when it comes to breakin. Another important thing especially with boats is to vary the rpms during the break in process.

here is another good link:
http://www.rogueracing.org/breakin.htm

A short summary of the below article:
Main point is to heat cycle the parts. You want the parts to heat and cool. Secondly you need to seat the rings so no synthetic oil for 5k miles or so.
You need to get to the top of the RPM band gradually. I think it has been mentioned here but you want to do short bursts to the top of the RPM at DIFFERENT engine loads.
Best way to break in an engine, IMO, is to hit the canyons with some common sense.

Here is an amsoil guide that talks about bikes but it is the same concept:

Breaking in an engine, by the very definition, is to "wear" the parts so they mate to one another better. Putting synthetic oil in a new engine will not allow that engine to break in properly and will glaze the cylinder walls. That is why most good engine builders recommend that you don't use Synthetic until the parts have had a chance to mate, seat, wear in, polish or what ever you want to call it.
The info below is from AMSOIL who manufacturer synthetic oil. Even they recommend not using synthetic to break in an engine. Since the Viper and Corvette is mentioned in a previous post, so does this...


Converting to AMSOIL and Breaking in a New Engine using synthetic oil. Critical Information You Need to Know.

Brought to you by Detroit, Michigan Truck and Automotive Engineers and Lubrication Specialists. We have 22 years experience engineering cars and trucks right here in the heart of the car and truck engineering and manufacturing capital of the world and we will put our extensive knowledge to use for you.

We are also longstanding Professional Grade members of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). This prestigious position is ONLY granted to degreed engineers with documented work experience in the automotive engineering industry.

We have packed this website with useful information that will help you to make an informed decision regarding your choice of lubrication and filtration products for your vehicles and equipment.

Some of the most frequent questions people ask us about AMSOIL are, what is required in order to convert to AMSOIL, how long do I have to wait before installing AMSOIL in a new engine, and what can I expect to notice once converted to AMSOIL?. Here are our answers in a detailed explanation:

Converting a vehicle to AMSOIL synthetic oil is fairly simple, but there are a few things you need to be aware of. First, if you have a brand new vehicle we recommend that you run a short cycle of petroleum oil on a gas engine passenger car or light truck (typically 500 miles or up to the first scheduled oil change) and approximately 5000 miles on a diesel engine in such as a Ford Powerstroke or Dodge Cummins Turbo Diesel before installing AMSOIL. This doesn't mean that you can't install AMSOIL sooner, as many OEM's install synthetics as a factory fill (such as the Dodge Viper and Chevrolet Corvette), it simply means these are our recommendations based on our extensive engineering studies and knowledge of this topic. Today's modern engine manufacturing and materials technology is much more sophisticated than in years past. Regular gas engine passenger cars and light truck engines do not require the extensive break in process many people think they do. In addition, by the time you get your new vehicle the engine has already been through a series of hot tests also run on in-plant chassis rolls testers to check functionality of all systems and then driven around the plant and railhead in order to get the vehicle to the dealer, which also helps accelerate breaking in of the engine.

The engine break-in issue is the subject of much controversy as everyone seems to have their opinion on when an engine is considered fully broken in. The information we provide is based on the results of engineering studies as well as many years of experience and teardown analysis on test vehicles. The differences between a vehicle that was properly and fully broken in and one that was not can often be hard to detect, yet there are tell-tale signs of this but they are not easily detected except in all but the most extreme situations. The subject of what occurs during the break-in process can easily be the subject of a 100 page report therefore what we cover in this website page is only the essential points you need to know.

Breaking in an engine is a process of properly wearing-in the pistons/cylinders/rings, bearings, valves, camshaft, lifters, rockers, etc... In addition, part of the breaking in process is not only wearing-in and seating the internal engine components but also stress relieving the components as well. Crankshafts, connecting rods, pistons, blocks etc... have many stresses due to the casting or forging process, machining and welding process. We have viewed and measured these stresses, called fringes, using what is called lazer holography. These stresses are properly reduced/eliminated by costly and time consuming heat aging as well as shot peening and or high frequency vibration on a very specialized bedplate for an extended period of time. For production applications this is cost and time prohibitive. Therefore, the next best thing is exposing your engine to multiple heating and cooling cycles under various load and RPM's, which is described in the following paragraph. The heating and cooling break in process continues over a period of time and does not need to be run on petroleum oil.

Breaking in a new engine is the one area that petroleum oil is better for than synthetics. You see, petroleum oil has a very low film strength which is ideal for breaking in a new engine. That is why we recommend you run the factory installed petroleum oil for about the about the first 500 miles or up to the first scheduled oil change. Then drain the oil, remove the factory installed oil filter and then install AMSOIL Synthetic motor oil and an AMSOIL Super Duty oil filter and your ready to go.

Further heat cycling break-in will continue during the multiple heating and cooling cycles from driving your vehicle under varying RPM and engine load conditions and then shutting it down for a long period of time to let it cool completely. The multiple heating and cooling cycles are a extremely important factor in properly breaking in a new engine and are often an overlooked factor in the total break-in process. These heating and cooling cycles achieve what is called stress relieving. Back in the "old days" of engine manufacturing, after casting and before an engine block was machined, it would be set outside for several months to age, during which stress relieving occurred naturally, then the block was machined, which helped to produce a better engine than one that was machined immediately after casting.

Itsme
02-25-2009, 06:01 PM
The boat arrived Thursday morning! Went up to check it out today. It will be prepped on Tuesday and brought down to the cover shop for the custom cover. Really looking fwd to seeing it in the shop all put together. Not as much as I'm looking forward to the ice melting though.....

More pics to follow as they get it all unwrapped. Thanks to Marc at Echo Bay Marina in Brookfield, CT for staying late today to finish the paperwork and let me check it out.

Colors are ruby red flake with midnight black. Top deck is white.

SWEET RIDE!!!! Congrats!!!